Dix sujets « hots » pour les administrateurs en 2019


Voici dix thèmes « chauds » qui devraient préoccuper les administrateurs en 2019.

Ils ont été identifiés par Kerry BerchemChristine LaFollette, et Frank Reddick, associés de la firme Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld.

Le billet est paru aujourd’hui sur le forum du Harvard Law School.

Bonne lecture ! Quels sont vos points de vue à ce sujet ?

 

Top 10 Topics for Directors in 2019

 

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld »

 

1. Corporate Culture

The corporate culture of a company starts at the top, with the board of directors, and directors should be attuned not only to the company’s business, but also to its people and values across the company. Ongoing and thoughtful efforts to understand the company’s culture and address any issues will help the board prepare for possible crises, reduce potential liability and facilitate appropriate responses internally and externally.

2. Board Diversity

As advocates and studies continue to highlight the business case for diversity, public companies are facing increasing pressure from corporate governance groups, investors, regulators and other stakeholders to improve gender and other diversity on the board. As a recent McKinsey report highlights, many successful companies regard inclusion and diversity as a source of competitive advantage and, specifically, as a key enabler of growth.

3. #MeToo Movement

A responsible board should anticipate the possibility that allegations of sexual harassment may arise against a C-suite or other senior executive. The board should set the right tone from the top to create a respectful culture at the company and have a plan in place before these incidents occur. In that way, the board is able to quickly and appropriately respond to any such allegations. Any such response plan should include conducting an investigation, proper communications with the affected parties and the implementation of any necessary remedial steps.

4. Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) concerns remained a hot-button issue in 2018. Social issues were at the forefront this year, ranging from gun violence, to immigration reform, to human trafficking, to calls for greater accountability and action from the private sector on issues such as climate change. This reflects a trend that likely foretells continued and increased focus on environmental, social and governance issues, including from regulatory authorities.

5. Corporate Strategy

Strategic planning should continue to be a high priority for boards in 2019, with a focus on the individual and combined impacts of the U.S. and global economies, geopolitical and regulatory uncertainties, and mergers and acquisitions activity on their industries and companies. Boards should consider maximizing synergies from recent acquisitions or reviewing their companies’ existing portfolios for potential divestitures.

6. Sanctions

During the second year of the Trump administration, U.S. sanctions expanded significantly to include new restrictions that target transactions with Iran, Russia and Venezuela. Additionally, the U.S. government has expanded its use of secondary sanctions to penalize non-U.S. companies that engage in proscribed activities involving sanctioned persons and countries. To avoid sanctions-related risks, boards should understand how these evolving rules apply to the business activities of their companies and management teams.

7. Shareholder Activism

There has been an overall increase in activism campaigns in 2018 regarding both the number of companies targeted and the number of board seats won by these campaigns. This year has also seen an uptick in traditionally passive and institutional investors playing an active role in encouraging company engagement with activists, advocating for change themselves and formulating express policies for handling activist campaigns.

8. Cybersecurity

With threats of nation-states infiltrating supply chains, and landmark laws being passed, cybersecurity and privacy are critical aspects of director oversight. Directors must focus on internal controls to guard against cyber-threats (including accounting, cybersecurity and insider trading) and expand diligence of third-party suppliers. Integrating both privacy and security by design will be critical to minimizing ongoing risk of cybersecurity breaches and state and federal enforcement.

9. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

A year has passed since President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) into law, and there will be plenty of potential actions and new faces on the tax landscape in 2019. Both the Senate Finance Committee and the Ways and Means Committee will have new chairs, and Treasury regulations implementing the TCJA will be finalized. President Trump will continue to make middle-class tax cuts a priority heading into next year. Perennial issues, such as transportation, retirement savings and health care, will likely make an appearance, and legislation improving the tax reform bill could be on the table depending on the outcome of the Treasury regulations.

10. SEC Regulation and Enforcement

To encourage public security ownership, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has adopted and proposed significant revisions to update and simplify disclosure requirements for public companies. It has taken steps to enhance the board’s role in evaluating whether to include shareholder proposals in a company’s proxy statement. It has also solicited comments on the possible reform of proxy advisor regulation, following increasing and competing calls from corporations, investor advocates and congressional leaders to revise these regulations. Boards and companies should monitor developments in this area, as well as possible changes in congressional and administration emphasis following the 2018 midterm elections.

Bonus: Midterm Elections

The 2018 midterm elections are officially over. Americans across the country cast their ballots for candidates for the House of Representatives and the Senate in what was widely perceived to be a referendum on President Trump’s first two years in office. With Democrats taking control of the House, and Republicans maintaining control of the Senate, a return to divided government will bring new challenges for effective governance. Compromise and bipartisanship will be tested by what is expected to be an aggressive oversight push from House Democrats. However, areas where there may be possible compromise include federal data privacy standards, infrastructure development, criminal justice reform and pharmaceutical drug pricing initiatives.

The complete publication is available here.

BlackRock soutient le modèle de gouvernance basé sur la primauté accordée aux parties prenantes


Aujourd’hui, je porte à votre attention, un événement marquant dans l’application des règles de gouvernance des sociétés.

En effet, Larry Fink, le CEO de la société d’investissement BlackRock, dans une lettre adressée aux dirigeants des plus importantes entreprises, rejette le modèle de gouvernance à la Friedman, basé sur la primauté de la satisfaction des actionnaires.

Il prône de surcroît une gouvernance qui adopte le point de vue d’un développement à long terme ainsi que la prise en compte de l’ensemble des parties prenantes.

Je vous invite à lire le résumé ci-dessous, publié par Martin Lipton* sur le site de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance, afin de vous former une opinion sur le sujet.

Bonne lecture !

 

BlackRock Supports Stakeholder Governance

 

 

 

BlackRock CEO, Larry Fink, who has been a leader in shaping corporate governance, has now firmly rejected Milton Friedman’s shareholder-primacy governance and embraced sustainability and stakeholder-focused governance. January 2018 BlackRock letter to CEOs.

In our Some Thoughts for Boards of Directors in 2018 (discussed on the Forum here), we noted:

The primacy of shareholder value as the exclusive objective of corporations, as articulated by Milton Friedman and then thoroughly embraced by Wall Street, has come under scrutiny by regulators, academics, politicians and even investors. While the corporate governance initiatives of the past year cannot be categorized as an abandonment of the shareholder primacy agenda, there are signs that academic commentators, legislators and some investors are looking at more nuanced and tempered approaches to creating shareholder value.

In his letter, Larry Fink says:

We also see many governments failing to prepare for the future, on issues ranging from retirement and infrastructure to automation and worker retraining. As a result, society increasingly is turning to the private sector and asking that companies respond to broader societal challenges. Indeed, the public expectations of your company have never been greater. Society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose. To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « BlackRock Supports Stakeholder Governance »

Without a sense of purpose, no company, either public or private, can achieve its full potential. It will ultimately lose the license to operate from key stakeholders. It will succumb to short-term pressures to distribute earnings, and, in the process, sacrifice investments in employee development, innovation, and capital expenditures that are necessary for long-term growth. It will remain exposed to activist campaigns that articulate a clearer goal, even if that goal serves only the shortest and narrowest of objectives. And ultimately, that company will provide subpar returns to the investors who depend on it to finance their retirement, home purchases, or higher education.

Most importantly, the letter sets out the type of engagement between corporations and their shareholders that BlackRock expects in order to secure its support against activist pressure. While the whole letter needs to be carefully considered in developing investor relations engagement practices, the following is of special note,

In order to make engagement with shareholders as productive as possible, companies must be able to describe their strategy for long-term growth. I want to reiterate our request, outlined in past letters, that you publicly articulate your company’s strategic framework for long-term value creation and explicitly affirm that it has been reviewed by your board of directors. This demonstrates to investors that your board is engaged with the strategic direction of the company. When we meet with directors, we also expect them to describe the board process for overseeing your strategy.

The statement of long-term strategy is essential to understanding a company’s actions and policies, its preparation for potential challenges, and the context of its shorter-term decisions. Your company’s strategy must articulate a path to achieve financial performance. To sustain that performance, however, you must also understand the societal impact of your business as well as the ways that broad, structural trends—from slow wage growth to rising automation to climate change—affect your potential for growth.

While the BlackRock letter is a major step in rejecting activism and short-termism and is a practical guide as to investor relations, it stops short of a critical step in assuring corporations that their efforts are bearing fruit—it does not commit BlackRock to publicly state its support for a corporation under attack by an activist seeking to impose financial engineering or other short-term action before the corporation has to endure a proxy fight. This type of early concrete support would be a major factor in supporting sustainability and long-term investment.

________________________________________

*Martin Lipton is a founding partner of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, specializing in mergers and acquisitions and matters affecting corporate policy and strategy. This post is based on a Wachtell Lipton publication by Mr. Lipton.

Dix thèmes prioritaires à mettre à l’ordre du jour des Boards en 2018


Aujourd’hui, je partage avec vous un article de Kerry E. Berchem et Christine B. LaFollette, associés de la firme Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, qui donne un aperçu des principales préoccupations des CA en 2018.

Ce qui est intéressant, outre les thèmes choisis, c’est l’impact de l’agenda de l’administration Trump sur la gouvernance des sociétés, notamment les points suivants :

– Assouplissements de la réglementation de la SEC ;

– Applications des directives de la SEC, en autres les efforts de remplacement de la réforme Dodd-Frank ;

– Nouveaux échanges commerciaux et applications de sanctions plus sévères ;

– La réforme de la fiscalité.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont les bienvenus.

 

Top 10 Topics for Directors in 2018

 

1. Cybersecurity threats.

Cybersecurity preparedness is essential in 2018 as the risk of, and associated adverse impact of, breaches continue to rise. The past year redefined the upward bounds of the megabreach, including the Yahoo!, Equifax and Uber hacks, and the SEC cyber-attack. As Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Co-Directors of Enforcement Stephanie Avakian and Steven Peikin warned, “The greatest threat to our markets right now is the cyber threat.” No crisis should go to waste. Boards should learn from others’ misfortunes and focus on governance, crisis management and recommended best practices relating to cyber issues.

2. Corporate social responsibility.

By embracing corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, boards are able to proactively identify and address legal, financial, operational and reputational risks in a way that can increase the company value to all stakeholders-investors, shareholders, employees and consumers. Boards should invest in CSR programming as an integral element of company risk assessment and compliance programs, and should advocate public reporting of CSR initiatives. Such initiatives can serve as both differentiating and value-enhancing factors. According to recent studies, companies with strong CSR practices are less likely to suffer large price declines, and they tend to have better three- to five-year returns on equity, as well as a greater chance of long-term success.

3. Managing five generations of employees.

In the coming years, employers will face the unprecedented challenge of having five generations of employees in the workplace. Companies and their boards can help address these tensions by better understanding employee expectations, encouraging cross-generation mentorship, and setting an example of generational diversity with respect to company leadership and members of the board. If managed correctly, boards and companies alike can benefit from the wisdom, collaboration and innovation that comes with generational diversity.

4. Corporate strategy.

Strategic planning with a particular focus on potential acquisitions should continue to be a high priority for boards in 2018. Boards should expect to face conflicting pressures, since shareholders will expect companies to invest in both long-term growth opportunities and short-term stock enhancement measures, including the deployment of excess cash for stock buybacks. Cross-border transactions will likely continue to be attractive options, subject to increased regulatory scrutiny in certain industries and of certain buyers.

5. Board composition.

Board diversity is being actively considered and encouraged by regulators, corporate governance groups and investors, both in the United States and internationally, and the current focus on board diversity is likely to continue. Companies should review the applicable diversity-related obligations in their jurisdictions and assess their current board composition, director search and nomination process, board refreshment practices and diversity policies.

6. Shareholder activism.

Shareholder activism has entrenched itself in the modern climate of corporate governance. In particular, shareholder activists have entered industries that, until recently, have generally steered clear of such investors, including the energy sector. There is an increased emphasis by prominent investors on challenging transactions, corporate strategy and traditional corporate governance concerns, such as board composition and staggered boards.

7. Internal investigations.

Boards are increasingly confronted with the possibility of wrongdoing implicating the company or its employees. The decision whether or not to undertake an independent internal investigation, and how, requires careful consideration and consultation with counsel, since the response of the board will have important implications for the ultimate effects on the company.

8. SEC regulatory relief.

We expect that the Trump administration and the Republican-led U.S. Congress will advance reforms in 2018 designed to encourage companies toward public ownership and to facilitate capital formation in both public and private markets. Although smaller companies will likely be the greatest beneficiaries of the proposals currently being considered, many proposals are expected to also benefit large public companies-by eliminating certain duplicative and nonmaterial disclosure requirements and by addressing concerns regarding shareholder proposals.

9. SEC enforcement.

In addition to new leadership at the SEC, ambitious legislative proposals in Congress and further developments in insider trading law have the potential to impact SEC enforcement, although certain enforcement streams, such as accounting and other disclosure-related investigations, are likely to remain largely unchanged. The SEC’s own cyber breach has brought renewed focus at the agency on information security and the integrity of trading systems. Efforts to repeal Dodd-Frank have also advanced through both chambers of Congress.

10. Trade and sanctions.

During the first year of the Trump administration, U.S. sanctions were expanded significantly to include complex new restrictions that target transactions with Iran, Russia, North Korea and Venezuela, among others. Additionally, there has been an uptick in sanctions enforcement actions, including a continued focus by U.S. enforcement agencies on officers and directors that approve, or engage in, proscribed activities. Accordingly, in an effort to avoid running afoul of U.S. sanctions, boards should be vigilant in understanding how these evolving rules apply to the business activities of their companies and management teams.

Special Bonus: Tax reform.

Tax reform has been a top priority for the Trump Administration and Republicans in Congress. After a slow start to 2017 in terms of legislative wins, the House and Senate are poised to send the first comprehensive tax reform bill to the President’s desk in more than thirty years. While the differences between the House and Senate bills still need to be resolved, the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is expected to pass by the end of the year and will present both benefits and challenges for companies in implementation and adaptation as unintended consequences are inevitably uncovered in the months and years to come.

The complete publication is available here.

Les relations entre les devoirs des administrateurs et la RSE | Ivan Tchotourian


Ivan Tchotourian*, professeur en droit des affaires à l’Université Laval, vient de publier un ouvrage dans la collection du Centre d’Études en Droit Économique (CÉDÉ). Cet ouvrage aborde la gouvernance d’entreprise et les devoirs des administrateurs.

Intitulé « Devoir de prudence et de diligence des administrateurs et RSE : Approche comparative et prospective », ce livre analyse les liens entre les devoirs des administrateurs et la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE).

L’interrogation centrale qu’aborde cette publication est de savoir ce qu’on attend aujourd’hui d’un administrateur de société prudent et diligent. De nos jours, une réflexion s’impose sur la prudence et la diligence dont doit faire preuve chaque administrateur. Après avoir exposé le devoir de prudence et de diligence des administrateurs dans ce qui fait son histoire et son actualité, les auteurs offrent une vision prospective sur le devenir de cette norme de conduite au tournant du XXe siècle faisant place à une responsabilisation croissante des sociétés par actions.

IMG00286-20100629-2027_2

Dans cet ouvrage, les auteurs s’interrogent de manière innovante sur le contenu du devoir de prudence et de diligence au regard de l’émergence des préoccupations liées à la RSE. Sous l’influence de facteurs macro juridiques et micro juridiques, la norme de conduite prudente et diligente des administrateurs évolue. La norme d’aujourd’hui ne sera sans doute plus celle de demain, encore faut-il pleinement en saisir les implications juridiques.

A priori, cet ouvrage devrait intéresser un certain nombre de lecteurs en gouvernance. En voici un bref aperçu :

La responsabilité sociale des entreprises et le développement durable sont devenus des objectifs tant politiques qu’économiques conférant de nouvelles attentes vis-à-vis du comportement des entreprises. Ces dernières détenant un pouvoir considérable, chacune de leurs décisions a des implications sur l’économie, l’emploi, l’environnement et la communauté locale. Au vu de ces observations, la norme de prudence et de diligence doit faire l’objet d’une attention renouvelée par les juristes non seulement dans ce qu’elle est aujourd’hui au Québec, au Canada et ailleurs, mais encore dans ce qu’elle se prépare à être dans un proche avenir.

Cet ouvrage s’intéresse à cette question en deux temps. La première partie de l’ouvrage détaille le devoir de gestion intelligente des administrateurs de sociétés dans une approche de droit comparé. La deuxième partie de l’ouvrage trace les grandes lignes de la norme de prudence et de diligence du XXI e siècle. En conclusion, l’auteur présente quelques réflexions prospectives.

Aperçu de la table des matières

Chapitre 1 – Introduction

Chapitre 2 – La norme de prudence et de diligence d’aujourd’hui

Prolégomènes sur le statut juridique des administrateurs

La norme de prudence et de diligence : des premières esquisses à l’ère des codifications

Contenu et régime du devoir de prudence et de diligence

Discussion autour de l’existence d’un recours judiciaire au profit du tiers

Chapitre 3 – La norme de prudence et de diligence de demain

Facteurs macro juridiques d’évolution Facteurs micro juridiques

Chapitre 4 – Conclusion

Postface

Bibliographie

Table de la législation

Table de la jurisprudence

Index analytique

Pour en savoir davantage.

 

*Ivan Tchotourian, professeur en droit des affaires, codirecteur du Centre d’Études en Droit Économique (CÉDÉ), membre du Groupe de recherche en droit des services financiers (www.grdsf.ulaval.ca), Faculté de droit, Université Laval.

 

Les relations entre les devoirs des administrateurs et la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE)


Ivan Tchotourian*, professeur en droit des affaires à l’Université Laval, vient de publier un ouvrage dans la collection du Centre d’Études en Droit Économique (CÉDÉ). Cet ouvrage aborde la gouvernance d’entreprise et les devoirs des administrateurs.

Intitulé « Devoir de prudence et de diligence des administrateurs et RSE : Approche comparative et prospective », ce livre analyse les liens entre les devoirs des administrateurs et la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE).

L’interrogation centrale qu’aborde cette publication est de savoir ce qu’on attend aujourd’hui d’un administrateur de société prudent et diligent. De nos jours, une réflexion s’impose sur la prudence et la diligence dont doit faire preuve chaque administrateur. Après avoir exposé le devoir de prudence et de diligence des administrateurs dans ce qui fait son histoire et son actualité, les auteurs offrent une vision prospective sur le devenir de cette norme de conduite au tournant du XXe siècle faisant place à une responsabilisation croissante des sociétés par actions.

IMG00286-20100629-2027_2

Dans cet ouvrage, les auteurs s’interrogent de manière innovante sur le contenu du devoir de prudence et de diligence au regard de l’émergence des préoccupations liées à la RSE. Sous l’influence de facteurs macro juridiques et micro juridiques, la norme de conduite prudente et diligente des administrateurs évolue. La norme d’aujourd’hui ne sera sans doute plus celle de demain, encore faut-il pleinement en saisir les implications juridiques.

A priori, cet ouvrage devrait intéresser un certain nombre de lecteurs en gouvernance. En voici un bref aperçu :

La responsabilité sociale des entreprises et le développement durable sont devenus des objectifs tant politiques qu’économiques conférant de nouvelles attentes vis-à-vis du comportement des entreprises. Ces dernières détenant un pouvoir considérable, chacune de leurs décisions a des implications sur l’économie, l’emploi, l’environnement et la communauté locale. Au vu de ces observations, la norme de prudence et de diligence doit faire l’objet d’une attention renouvelée par les juristes non seulement dans ce qu’elle est aujourd’hui au Québec, au Canada et ailleurs, mais encore dans ce qu’elle se prépare à être dans un proche avenir.

Cet ouvrage s’intéresse à cette question en deux temps. La première partie de l’ouvrage détaille le devoir de gestion intelligente des administrateurs de sociétés dans une approche de droit comparé. La deuxième partie de l’ouvrage trace les grandes lignes de la norme de prudence et de diligence du XXI e siècle. En conclusion, l’auteur présente quelques réflexions prospectives.

Aperçu de la table des matières

Chapitre 1 – Introduction

Chapitre 2 – La norme de prudence et de diligence d’aujourd’hui

Prolégomènes sur le statut juridique des administrateurs

La norme de prudence et de diligence : des premières esquisses à l’ère des codifications

Contenu et régime du devoir de prudence et de diligence

Discussion autour de l’existence d’un recours judiciaire au profit du tiers

Chapitre 3 – La norme de prudence et de diligence de demain

Facteurs macro juridiques d’évolution Facteurs micro juridiques

Chapitre 4 – Conclusion

Postface

Bibliographie

Table de la législation

Table de la jurisprudence

Index analytique

Pour en savoir davantage.

 

*Ivan Tchotourian, professeur en droit des affaires, codirecteur du Centre d’Études en Droit Économique (CÉDÉ), membre du Groupe de recherche en droit des services financiers (www.grdsf.ulaval.ca), Faculté de droit, Université Laval.

 

Douze raisons pour faire de la RSE un levier de croissance


Voici une infographie réalisée par Pixelis, directement inspirée de la publication « le cercle – LES ECHOS« . Comme vous le savez, les infographies sont d’excellents moyens pour mieux communiquer et mieux faire passer les messages.

Dans ce cas-ci, il s’agit d’illustrer douze raisons qui devraient inciter les entreprises à mettre en œuvre des actions qui favoriseront la responsabilité sociale.

Bon visionnement !

 Les 12 raisons de faire de la RSE un levier de croissance

 

IMG_20140516_140943

 

Comment rendre plus explicite le travail des administrateurs eu égard à la prise en compte des parties prenantes ?


Quels moyens les organisations peuvent-elles prendre afin de s’assurer que les intérêts de toutes les parties prenantes soient pris en compte plutôt qu’uniquement ceux des actionnaires.

Cet article écrit par Leo Strine, Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court et Senior Fellow du Harvard Law School Program on Corporate Governance, et paru dans le Harvard Business Law Review, propose, à l’instar de la règlementation du Delaware, de modifier les actes constitutifs des entreprises afin d’énoncer clairement que les corporations publiques à buts lucratifs doivent gérer non seulement en fonction des intérêts des actionnaires, mais également en fonction des intérêts de toutes les autres parties prenantes.

Public benefit corporation” is a for-profit corporation organized under and subject to the requirements of this chapter that is intended to produce a public benefit or public benefits and to operate in a responsible and sustainable manner. To that end, a public benefit corporation shall be managed in a manner that balances the stockholders’ pecuniary interests, the best interests of those materially affected by the corporation’s conduct, and the public benefit or public benefits identified in its certificate of incorporation.

This general provision is matched by a more specific one directed to the duties of directors, which plainly states: The board of directors shall manage or direct the business and affairs of the public benefit corporation in a manner that balances the pecuniary interests of the stockholders, the best interests of those materially affected by the corporation’s conduct, and the specific public benefit or public benefits identified in its certificate of incorporation.

Bonne lecture !

MAKING IT EASIER FOR DIRECTORS TO “DO THE RIGHT THING”?

 

The abstract of Chief Justice Strine’s essay summarizes it briefly as follows:

IMG_20141013_144243

Some scholars argue that managers should take constituencies other than stockholders into account when running a corporation, and refuse to put short-term profit for stockholders over the best interests of the corporation’s employees, consumers, and communities, as well as the environment and society generally. In other words, they argue that managers should “do the right thing,” while ignoring that in the current corporate accountability structure, stockholders are the only constituency given any enforceable rights, and thus are the only one with substantial influence over managers. Few commentators have proposed real solutions that would give corporate managers more ability and greater incentives to consider the interests of other constituencies.

This Article posits that benefit corporation statutes have the potential to change the accountability structure within which managers operate. These statutes create incremental reform that puts actual power behind the idea that corporations should “do the right thing.” Certain provisions of the Delaware benefit corporation statute are discussed as an example of how these statutes can create a meaningful shift in the balance of power that will in fact give corporate managers more ability to and impose upon them an enforceable duty to “do the right thing.”

But this Article acknowledges that several important questions must be answered to determine whether benefit corporation statutes will have the durable, systemic effect desired. First, the initial wave of entrepreneurs who form benefit corporations must demonstrate a genuine commitment to social responsibility to preserve the credibility of the movement. Second, because the benefit corporation model relies on stockholders to enforce the duties to other constituencies, socially responsible investment funds must be willing to vote their long-term consciences instead of cashing in for short-term gains. To that end, it is crucial that benefit corporations show that doing things “the right way” will be profitable in the long run. Third, benefit corporations must pass the “going public” test. Finally, subsidiaries that are governed as benefit corporations must honor their commitments and grow successfully, if the movement is to grow to scale.

 

Les grandes priorités des actionnaires activistes pour 2014


La grande majorité des actionnaires de compagnies publiques ne sont pas impliqués dans la gouvernance et dans le management des entreprises dans lesquelles ils ont investi. On peut dire qu’ils font confiance aux mesures prises par les actionnaires plus activistes et par les fonds d’investissement pour garantir un comportement de bon citoyen corporatif et pour prendre des décisions qui auront pour effet d’augmenter la valeur de leur investissement.

Alors quelles seront les priorités des activistes en 2014 pour assurer que les entreprises travaillent dans le meilleur intérêt des actionnaires, petits, moyens et gros …

L’article rédigé par Eleanor Bloxham, PCD de The Value Alliance, dans Fortune présente un sommaire des entrevues que l’auteure a faites avec les principaux actionnaires activistes aux É.U.

Que retrouve-t-on sur l’agenda de ces investisseurs ? Plusieurs priorités en fonction des intérêts que ces groupes d’investisseurs défendent. Cependant, il ressort un certain consensus sur les thèmes suivants :

« Board diversity, executive pay, transparency on political contributions, and human rights improvements »

Je vous invite à lire l’article ci-dessous, dont je produis un court extrait :

Activist shareholders’ top priorities for 2014

Activist shareholders are stockpiling record amounts of cash this year, determined to take on below-par boards.  But industry expert Lucy Marcus asks if directors are going too far on the defensive.

Photo: Jetta Productions/Getty Images

Many of us free ride on actions taken by active, long-term shareholders. These unsung heroes goad managers and boards to reach better decisions, make available desirable employment opportunities and, overall, push them to act like good corporate citizens. These active investors accomplish these things by talking to companies, preparing proxy proposals for all shareholders to consider, and offering recommendations on director elections and company-sponsored proxy measures.

What shape can we expect their efforts to take this year? Overall, we can expect more sophisticated requests of companies than we’ve ever seen before, and more direct board member interaction with shareholders.

To get the behind-the-scenes skinny, I asked shareholders and others who know what’s in store this upcoming proxy season. Here are their informed, excerpted, and edited comments:

Photo: Jetta Productions/Getty Images

Également, je vous invite à visionner cette vidéo de 7 minutes produite par Lucy Marcus qui porte sur ce que le Board peut faire pour se préparer à la nouvelle offensive qui s’annonce en 2014 ?

In the Boardroom: Directors prepare for shareholder attack

Activist shareholders are stockpiling record amounts of cash this year, determined to take on below-par boards.  But industry expert Lucy Marcus asks if directors are going too far on the defensive.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Le développement durable | Une gouvernance de création de valeur !


Il me fait plaisir de souligner à tous les abonnés de mon blogue ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes membres des groupes LinkedIn, un congrès vraiment exceptionnel et précurseur portant sur le développement durable dans la perspective d’une gouvernance exemplaire.

Il s’agit du congrès annuel de deux jours organisé par l’Ordre des administrateurs agréés à Hôtel Omni Mont-Royal, les 29 et 30 janvier 2014. Le congrès est l’événement privilégié, pour les Adm.A., ainsi que pour les diplômés ASC du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés – CAS (partenaire de l’événement), de compléter leurs obligations de formation continue.

Je vous invite à consulter le programme ci-dessous afin de constater la richesse et la pertinence des sujets abordés ainsi que la qualité des intervenants. Vous voulez savoir comment les experts de la gouvernance et du management envisagent l’apport d’une démarche de développement durable à la compétitivité des entreprises et à la valeur ajoutée de leurs administrateurs, n’hésitez pas à consulter le programme et à vous inscrire à cet événement.

Je serai présent à ce congrès et j’espère avoir le plaisir de vous rencontrer à cette occasion.

Prenez connaissance du document électronique conçu pour un visionnement sur écran …  et inscrivez-vous !

Le développement durable | Une gouvernance de création de valeur !

Congrès de l’Ordre des ADMA

29 et 30 janvier 2014 à Montréal

Logo Congrès 2014 des ADMA

Le Congrès 2014 des ADMA portera sur le thème : Développement durable : un terrain fertile à la création de valeur.
Le développement durable est un élément stratégique clé des organisations d’aujourd’hui, quels que soient leurs secteurs d’activité. Elles font face à des attentes importantes à ce sujet.

PROGRAMME

Le programme du congrès 2014 est disponible pour consultation et téléchargement en cliquant ici. Le document a été conçu pour être visionné sur un écran et non pour être imprimé. Les inscriptions sont ouvertes sur Capital ADMA. Ne tardez pas, certaines conférences seront contingentées.

Un homme d'affaires protège la terre de sa main (congrès 2014)

LIEU DU CONGRÈS

Hôtel Omni Mont-Royal 1050, Sherbrooke Ouest Montréal, H3A 2R6

Pour ceux qui souhaitent se loger sur place, l’Ordre a négocié un tarif valable jusqu’au 6 janvier 2014, 17h00. Plus de détails ici.

TRANSPORT

L’Ordre a négocié un rabais avec Via Rail et a conclu une entente avec Covoiturage.ca pour encourager les participants qui souhaitent utiliser un moyen de transport écoresponsable. Pour les résidents de Montréal et des proches banlieues, le lieu du congrès est facilement accessible par le métro (station Peel de la ligne verte) et le bus de ville (ligne 24 sur la rue Sherbrooke). Vous pouvez consulter le plan du centre ville proposé par la STM en cliquant ici.

Un modèle d’affaires pertinent pour actualiser les principes du développement durable


Cet article, rédigé par Marc Bertoneche et Cornis van der Lugt, est récemment paru dans Director Notes, une publication du Conference Board. Les auteurs présentent les résultats d’un modèle d’affaires efficace pour évaluer les retombées financières des actions environnementales et du développement durable.

L’article explique le fonctionnement du modèle d’affaires à l’aide de deux indicateurs principaux : (1) les actions de développement durable et (2) les indicateurs de performance financière. Ce modèle conceptuel est illustré par l’utilisation de plusieurs variables représentées dans le tableau ci-dessous.

Je vous invite à lire cet article qui fera sans doute école dans le design d’un cadre méthodologique qui réconcilie les principes du développement durable avec les impératifs économiques et financiers des entreprises.

The sustainability Business case

While much has been published on the business case for sustainability during the last decade, businesses have been slow to adopt the green innovation and sustainability agenda. Reasons include a lack of consistency in the indicators employed by analysts, and a failure to effectively incorporate financial value drivers into the equation. This article defines a green business case model that includes seven core financial value drivers of special interest to financial analysts.

In the following pages, we present a business case model that focuses on environmental action areas known to sustainability experts and their link with important indicators widely used by financial officers and investors. We present a model in which sustainability initiatives are assessed in an economic manner and pursued on the basis of a clear link to financial performance. The model positions sustained financial performance and market value as the ultimate test, with cost benefit analysis at the heart of its approach. As far as dependent variables are concerned, we suggest research and analysis should focus on the core financial value drivers defined by Alfred Rappaport, author of Creating Shareholder Value, and others since the 1980s. These drivers help define a longer-term approach that is forward looking and strategic.

Click image to enlarge

Two reasons to ignore the business case for sustainability- and what we can do about it (alexaroscoe.com)

La maximisation de la valeur des actions est-elle incompatible avec le développement durable ?


Aujourd’hui, j’ai choisi de partager avec vous un article de Richard Lawton* sur l’importance pour les conseils d’administration d’intégrer la perspective du développement durable et de la responsabilité sociale dans leur processus décisionnel.

Je crois que les C.A. doivent prendre leurs responsabilités (prendre l’intérêt de l’entreprise comme un tout) et ne pas céder à la pression des actionnaires qui souhaitent réaliser des gains à court terme …

« Managing the tension between maximizing shareholder value and integrating sustainability into corporate strategy requires adaptive leadership at the Board level ».

Is Maximizing Shareholder Value Inherently Incompatible with Sustainability?

« What is the purpose of a publicly traded company?  Are maximizing profits and share price synonymous with maximizing shareholder value?  How do shareholders who may have diverse goals, interests and motives define value?  Answers to fundamental questions like these, along with the underlying assumptions behind them, are being surfaced and re-examined as concepts like sustainability, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and the triple bottom line have become part of common business nomenclature. While social enterprises like benefit corporations are leading a structural shift toward a more generative and less extractive economic system, publicly traded companies still wield the greatest influence over the economy’s design and function since they account for the vast majority of global G.D.P…

English: The "three pillars" of sust...
English: The « three pillars » of sustainability bounded by the environment (earth, life) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), with over 13,000 director members, recently published a cover story for it’s NACD Directorship magazine entitled “Sustainability Rising.” The article is an ambitious attempt at offering directors a comprehensive and multi-faceted overview of sustainability and its growing importance as a governance issue. Noting that corporate sustainability can be an enigmatic term, the article cites The Dow Jones World Sustainability Index’s definition of it as being “an approach to creating long-term shareholder value by embracing opportunities and managing risks deriving from economic, environmental, and social trends and challenges.”

This ambiguous definition seems to suggest that sustainability is just another possible means to the desired end of creating long-term shareholder value.  But is creating long-term shareholder value the only desired end of a corporation?  Could social and environmental measures of value also be desired ends alongside economic value?  Isn’t this what triple bottom line means?

Maximizing Shareholder Value:  Legal Requirement or Managerial Choice?

In her insightful book “The Shareholder Value Myth,” Cornell Law School Professor Lynn Stout explains how, contrary to popular belief, corporate law does not require boards of directors to maximize shareholder value.  Lynn argues that stakeholder statutes and the business judgment rule give directors the latitude necessary to consider the interests of other stakeholders, such as employees and the environmental impacts on communities, in establishing corporate goals and strategy – even at the expense of short-term profits or share price. She also illustrates how a myopic focus on share price paradoxically ends up harming shareholders and other stakeholders over the long-term, since such a one-dimensional approach induces and rewards behavior that is at odds with natural laws that govern all complex systems ».

___________________________

*Richard Lawton is Founder & Principal of Triple Ethos, LLC, http://www.tripleethos.com a consultancy that works with organizations to integrate sustainability values into board governance and strategy.  He earned his MBA in Sustainability from Antioch University New England in 2012, and is a Governance Fellow with the National Association of Corporate Directors

Shareholder Proposals Show Investors are Pushing for More Disclosure… (prweb.com)

How shareholder advocacy is impacting corporate sustainability (guardian.co.uk)

The triple bottom line: Young Canadian found his calling in corporate responsibility (metronews.ca)

Corporate Sustainability Drives Public Confidence, Survey Finds (environmentalleader.com)

Employees Take Corporate Sustainability Efforts Home, Study Says (environmentalleader.com)

« Twenty years on, corporate sustainability still lacking » (interfacecutthefluff.com)

Corporations Can No Longer Sleepwalk Towards Sustainability (cleantechnica.com)

Sustainability as a new business strategy (ecoseed.org)

Gros débat sur la rémunération des dirigeants en France !


Voici un article d’actualité qui présente la problématique des rémunérations excessives des dirigeants en France (et en Suisse). L’année 2013 s’annonce assez importante pour la mise en oeuvre de moyens destinés à mettre un frein aux rémunérations jugées abusives par les actionnaires. Cet article partagé par Patrice Camus, directeur de projet en développement durable au Groupe Desjardins (Canada), a été publié sur la page de Novethic, une filiale de la Caisse des Dépôts française qui diffuse des communiqués sur le développement durable ainsi qu’un centre de recherche sur l’investissement socialement responsable (ISR) et sur la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE).

Le « Say on Pay » et les indemnités de départ et de non concurrence devraient être au menu des AG du CAC 40 ce printemps. Le rapport sur la gouvernance, publié le 20 février, laisse augurer d’un futur projet de loi limitant fortement les possibilités de rémunération « excessives». En attendant, la question du lien entre ces rémunérations et la performance des entreprises est posée plus systématiquement par les actionnaires.

Le retour du débat sur la rémunération des dirigeants

 

photograph of Novartis human resources buildin...
photograph of Novartis human resources building designed by Frank Gehry as part of the new campus built to replace the former Ciba-Geigy buildings in Basel, Switzerland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Le patron de Novartis capitule

« … le cas le plus emblématique est celui de Daniel Vasella, le patron du   groupe pharmaceutique Novartis, qui a soulevé un tollé en Suisse début   février. Une émission de télévision a révélé le 5 février qu’il allait partir   avec 72 millions de francs suisses (plus de 58 millions d’euros). La   Fondation Ethos, qui défend le droit des actionnaires et qui a progressivement   imposé un « Say on Pay » dans le pays, a aussitôt lancé une campagne pour   demander l’annulation du contrat, en annonçant que dans le cas contraire elle   poursuivait juridiquement le conseil d’administration de Novartis pour avoir   manqué à sa mission de diligence en acceptant un tel système. Juste avant   l’AG, qui se tient ce 22 février, Daniel Vasella et son conseil ont capitulé;   le contrat a été annulé. Cette capitulation aurait été arrachée de haute   lutte même si l’intéressé a déclaré dans un communiqué : « j’ai compris que nombreux sont ceux, en   Suisse, qui jugent ce montant exagéré en dépit du fait que j’avais annoncé   mon intention de le verser à des œuvres caritatives ». Le   bénéfice de Novartis avait lui reculé de 7% en 2012… »

Plan d’action : Droit européen des sociétés et gouvernance d’entreprise


Voici, avec quelques jours de retard, le plan d’action pour la modernisation du droit des sociétés et les règles de gouvernance d’entreprise de l’UE. Ce plan propose un cadre juridique moderne pour une plus grande implication des actionnaires et une meilleure viabilité des entreprises.

(1) Document complet | Plan d’action: droit européen des sociétés et gouvernance d’entreprise

(2) Communiqué de presse | Modernisation du droit des sociétés et des règles de gouvernance des entreprises de l’UE

La Commission européenne a adopté ce jour un plan d’action dans lequel elle expose les initiatives qu’elle compte prendre en matière de droit des sociétés et de gouvernance d’entreprise. Le cadre de l’UE en matière de droit des sociétés et de gouvernance d’entreprise doit garantir la compétitivité et la viabilité des entreprises. Il ressort clairement de l’analyse et des consultations que la Commission a menées ces deux dernières années qu’il est possible d’améliorer encore les choses, en encourageant et en facilitant l’engagement des actionnaires à long terme, en renforçant la transparence entre les entreprises et leurs actionnaires et en simplifiant les opérations transfrontières des entreprises européennes.

Sur la base de sa réflexion et des résultats de ses consultations, la Commission a dégagé plusieurs lignes d’action essentielles à la mise en place de la législation moderne dont les entreprises ont besoin pour être viables et compétitives.

M. Michel Barnier, commissaire chargé du marché intérieur et des services, a déclaré à ce sujet: «Ce plan d’action sur le droit des sociétés et la gouvernance d’entreprise trace la voie à suivre: les actionnaires devraient non seulement obtenir des droits supplémentaires, mais aussi assumer pleinement leurs responsabilités pour que leur entreprise reste compétitive à plus long terme. Les entreprises, quant à elles, devraient devenir plus transparentes à plusieurs égards. Leur gouvernance n’en sera que plus efficace.»

Éléments clés du plan d’action

1. Pour améliorer la gouvernance d’entreprise, un renforcement de la transparence entre les entreprises et leurs actionnaires qui passera notamment par:

English: Main meeting room of the European Com...
English: Main meeting room of the European Commission in the Berlaymont building (13th Floor) on 2007 EU open day, tourists trying out Commissioner’s chairs. View from enterance towards far windows. Français : Le bâtiment du Berlaymont, siège de la Commission européenne. Salle de réunion principale. Nederlands: Het Berlaymontgebouw, de zetel van de Europese Commissie. Hoofd vergaderingsruimte binnen. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  1. un accroissement de la transparence des entreprises en ce qui concerne la diversité de leur conseil d’administration (ou de surveillance) et leurs politiques de gestion des risques;
  2. une amélioration de l’information sur la gouvernance d’entreprise;
  3. une meilleure identification des actionnaires par les émetteurs;
  4. un renforcement des règles de transparence applicables aux investisseurs institutionnels en ce qui concerne leurs politiques en matière de vote et d’engagement.

2. Des initiatives visant à encourager et à faciliter l’engagement des actionnaires à long terme, notamment:

  1. une plus grande transparence sur les politiques de rémunération et la rémunération individuelle des administrateurs, ainsi qu’un droit de vote des actionnaires sur la politique de rémunération et le rapport consacré aux rémunérations;
  2. une extension du droit de regard des actionnaires sur les transactions avec des parties liées, c’est-à-dire les transactions entre la société et ses administrateurs ou actionnaires majoritaires;
  3. la création de règles opérationnelles appropriées pour les conseillers en vote (c’est-à-dire les entreprises qui fournissent des conseils aux actionnaires, notamment en matière de vote), tout particulièrement en matière de transparence et de conflits d’intérêts;
  4. une clarification du concept d’«action concertée» pour faciliter la coopération des actionnaires sur les questions de gouvernance d’entreprise;
  5. une enquête sur la possibilité d’encourager l’actionnariat salarié.

3. Des initiatives dans le domaine du droit des sociétés pour soutenir les entreprises européennes et favoriser leur croissance et leur compétitivité:

  1. la poursuite de l’analyse quant à une éventuelle initiative sur les transferts de siège statutaire entre États membres;
  2. la facilitation des fusions transfrontières;
  3. des règles claires de l’UE en matière de scissions transfrontières;
  4. des mesures pour faire suite à la proposition de statut de la société privée européenne (voir IP/08/1003) en vue d’améliorer les opportunités transfrontières des PME;
  5. une campagne d’information sur les statuts de la société européenne/de la société coopérative européenne;
  6. des mesures ciblées sur les groupes d’entreprises, à savoir la reconnaissance de la notion d’«intérêt de groupe» et une plus grande transparence des structures de groupe.

Le plan d’action prévoit également la fusion en un instrument unique de toutes les grandes directives relatives au droit des sociétés. Cette opération améliorerait l’accessibilité et la lisibilité du droit des sociétés de l’UE et réduirait les risques d’incohérences.

Contexte

La stratégie Europe 2020 de la Commission (voir IP/10/225) appelle à l’amélioration de l’environnement des entreprises en Europe. Le droit des sociétés et les règles de gouvernance applicables aux entreprises, aux investisseurs et aux salariés dans l’UE doivent être adaptés aux besoins de la société d’aujourd’hui et à l’évolution de l’environnement économique. Le cadre de l’UE en matière de droit des sociétés et de gouvernance d’entreprise doit garantir la compétitivité et la viabilité des entreprises.

Avec la publication en 2011 de son livre vert sur la gouvernance des entreprises de l’UE (voir IP/11/404), la Commission a lancé un processus de réflexion approfondie sur l’efficacité des règles de gouvernance qui s’appliquent actuellement aux entreprises européennes. Elle a également lancé une consultation publique en ligne sur l’avenir du droit des sociétés de l’UE, qui a suscité de nombreuses réactions de la part d’un large éventail de parties prenantes (voir IP/12/149).

Voir également le MEMO/12/972

Pour en savoir plus sur le droit des sociétés et la gouvernance d’entreprise, voir:

http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/company/index_fr.htm

Administrateur | Lettre de l’Institut français des administrateurs (IFA) – Octobre et Novembre 2012


Découvrez les N°43 et 44 de la lettre de liaison mensuelle de l’IFA partenaire du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés. Cette publication électronique mensuelle au format pdf téléchargeable via le site internet a pour objectif de faciliter l’accès aux informations-clés sur les activités de l’IFA pour tous les adhérents : l’agenda des prochains évènements et séminaires, les activités en région, les actualités de la gouvernance, les dernières publications et les principaux services disponibles.

Administrateur | La vie de l’IFA

Dans le numéro d’octobre, vous trouverez, entre autre, un compte rendu de la troisième cérémonie de remise des Certificats Administrateurs de Sociétés (ASC). « Émotion et enthousiasme étaient au rendez-vous pour les nouveaux titulaires du Certificat de l’année 2012 ». On notera également la présence du président du CAS, M. Bruno Déry, venu découvrir les 118 cousins français certifiés.

Également, on y trouvera un billet de M. Jean Florent Rérolle qui se questionne sur la pertinente de la responsabilité sociale pour l’actionnaire ? Celui-ci participe depuis l’origine de l’IFA aux réfléxions de fond de l’nstitut. Il est en particulier l’auteur d’une grande partie du fameux Vademecum de l’administrateur de l’IFA. Au travers de son Blog (www.rerolle.eu), il publie régulièrement des articles sur ses observations des pratiques de gouvernance en France. Vous trouverez, ci-dessous, un extrait de cet article.

« Avec la persistance et l’approfondissement de la crise économique, la responsabilité sociale est écartelée entre deux logiques. La première est positive et résulte du débat qui s’est engagé sur l’avenir du capitalisme : nos modèles économiques et sociaux doivent être radicalement repensés et les problématiques de durabilité sont probablement centrales dans la rénovation qui s’annonce. La seconde est négative : si la solution de nos problèmes ne peut venir que de la croissance, il est essentiel de donner la priorité à la compétitivité de nos entreprises et donc de s’assurer que les investissements sont rentables et, qu’ils le soient très vite …. »

Dans l’édition de novembre, l’on retrouvera un excellent article d’Alain Martel, secrétaire général de l’IFA, qui traite Du bon usage des administrateurs. En voici un extrait :

« De nombreux dirigeants sont actuellement engagés dans la bataille du maintien de l’activité de leur entreprise, quand ce n’est pas dans son sauvetage. Un combat évidemment très stressant et chronophage, que beaucoup d’entre eux mènent seuls. Or, si la solitude traditionnelle du chef d’entreprise est parfois difficile à vivre quand tout va bien, elle est sans doute encore plus pénible à supporter dans une conjoncture délicate. Et pourtant, cette solitude n’est pas une fatalité. Le dirigeant peut s’entourer d’experts pour le guider et l’aider à réfléchir aux meilleures solutions de pérennisation de son modèle économique. Les administrateurs indépendants sont à même de jouer ce rôle, au sein de Conseils d’administration créés en bonne et due forme ou, de façon plus informelle, au sein de structures similaires d’accompagnement (prélude à un conseil plus formalisé), indispensables pour une prise de recul, souvent salvatrice…. »

La transparence en matière de rémunération des hauts dirigeants : Une initiative mondiale


Je porte à votre attention un compte rendu du Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), paru dans triplepundit.com, qui propose des changements majeurs dans la divulgation des données sur la rémunération des hauts dirigeants, à l’échelle mondiale. Le GRI propose notamment la publication du ratio – rémunération de la direction par rapport à la moyenne des employés. Je vous encourage donc à appréhender l’ampleur du phénomène et à être mieux informés sur la mise en oeuvre d’un standard international en matière de rédaction de rapports de développement durable. 

« The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting transparency around economic, social and environmental issues at all organizations – companies to NGOs to governments at any level. Basically, it’s an international standard for writing sustainability reports – and interest in the reporting standard is growing rapidly. In 2011, 2834 reports were registered with GRI.

The Global Reporting Initiative is tremendously popular in Europe with 47% of reports originating there. GRI reporting in the US is growing like gangbusters, however, with 350 reports registered in 2011 compared to only 100 in 2010. That’s partly thanks to the attention and commitment of Mike Wallace, Director of GRI’s Focal Point USA. The GRI guidelines are continuously updated based on feedback from users, which is filtered through working groups. I must say that when I dove into the guidelines, I wasn’t expecting any surprises. But I was wrong.  Check out this note from the summaryon the changes to the “Governance” section of reporting :

EXECUTIVE PAY BY COUNTRY VS AVERAGE WORKER CRO...
EXECUTIVE PAY BY COUNTRY VS AVERAGE WORKER CRONY CAPITALISM (Photo credit: snowlepard)

G4 is proposing a number of changes to governance and remuneration disclosures to strengthen the link between governance and sustainability performance, taking into account the consistency within existing governance frameworks and developments in that field. The proposed changes include new disclosures in the Profile section of the report on the ratio of executive compensation to median compensation, the ratio of executive compensation to lowest compensation and the ratio of executive compensation increase to median compensation ».

Comment l’attention accordée aux stakeholders contribue-t-elle au développement durable et la création de valeur à long terme ?


Voici un rapport de Deloitte sur l’importance à accorder aux parties prenantes (stakeholders), dont les actionnaires (shareholders), dans la réalisation du développement durable et la création de valeur à long terme.

Vous pouvez télécharger le document en version PDF

How stakeholders view a company, what they expect of the company, and how they understand the company’s impact on society and the environment, in addition to its financial results, can affect business value. Determining the impact on value of environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues to multiple stakeholders is becoming central to how many companies craft their sustainability strategy and report on their sustainability performance. This opens the door to a new vision of the business objective: enlightened value maximization, which seeks greater alignment between various stakeholders to generate long-term business value.

This paper describes:

  1. The impact shareholders and other stakeholders can have on corporate valuations by identifying and reacting to ESG risks
  2. How stakeholder perception of the company and its actions are likely to drive the corporate agenda, including ESG performance goal setting
  3. Strategic steps that can help a company mitigate the impact of stakeholder action on its bottom line, cost of capital and risk, and leverage new opportunities to generate business value.

Les liens entre la rémunération et le développement durable – Un rapport du Conference Board


Voici un rapport du Conference Board qui décrit comment une entreprise peut récompenser les efforts liés au développement durable. Les administrateurs de sociétés sont de plus en plus interpelés sur ces questions de « sustainability » et la direction doit s’assurer de bien mesurer les résultats accomplis afin de récompenser les réussites dans ce domaine.  

Linking executive compensation to sustainability performance

« Sustainability issues are becoming increasingly common in the boardroom, particularly as the volume of shareholder proposals regarding environmental and social policies has grown in recent proxy seasons. One area receiving attention from directors is the link between sustainability performance and executive compensation. This Director Notes discusses corporate directors’ increasing interest in sustainability matters, progress toward a notion of performance assessment that incorporates nonfinancial elements, and companies’ efforts to explain how they link incentive awards to sustainability targets in response to shareholder proposals filed on this topic since 2009. »

Capsules vidéos du CAS en gouvernance – La juricomptabilité et le développement durable


Le Collège des administrateurs de sociétés est fier de présenter la suite de sa première série « Capsules d’experts ». Huit experts du Collège partagent une réflexion le temps de 2 à 3 minutes en se prononçant sur des sujets d’actualité en gouvernance. Nous avons déjà présenté les quatres premières capsules la semaine dernière. La semaine prochaine, le Collège dévoilera les deux dernières capsules de sa série de huit.

Deux nouvelles « capsules d’experts » sont maintenant en ligne; ayant pour thèmes « La juricomptabilité » par M. François Filion et « Le développement durable » par Mme Johanne Gélinas.
Série « capsules d'experts »

À venir la semaine prochaine :

Dévoilement des deux dernières capsules

par André Courville

Associé principal, Ernst & Young

par Yan Cimon

Professeur agrégé en management, Université Laval

Comment récompenser les dirigeants pour les résultats obtenus dans le domaine de la RSE ?


Voici un article très pertinent, sur un sujet d’actualité, récemment publié dans theconversation.edu.au et partagé via Richard Leblanc. Les organisations font de plus en plus état des actions entreprises dans le domaine de la RSE et du développement durable et elles mettent en place des mécanismes de suivi qui tient compte de toutes les parties prenantes et qui se matérialisent à plus long terme. Il s’agit d’un domaine de recherche relativement récent, notamment l’étude portant sur les pratiques visant à compenser les résultats de la direction en cette matière.

Beyond the bottom line: how to reward executives for sustainable practice

Vous trouverez, ci-dessous, quelques extraits de résultats de recherche dans ce domaine :

« Are sustainability-dependent executive bonuses the answer to saving the planet ?  Research recently conducted by the Centre for Corporate Governance at the University of Technology, Sydney, examined whether a sample of Australia’s leading corporations are rewarding their executives for achieving sustainability targets as well as financial targets.

The question of how sustainability might be linked to executive remuneration was part of a broader study of how companies are integrating sustainability objectives into their core business strategies.

Most large companies in Australia have developed sustainability strategies over recent years, but in a rather piecemeal fashion in response to specific external demands – reducing greenhouse gases, implementing family-friendly policies and so forth.  They are now looking to find ways of measuring, monitoring and integrating these programs into their overall business planning.

The research report, entitled Steering Sustainability, was commissioned by think tank Catalyst Australia as part of its Full Disclosure campaign.  The campaign’s objective was to explore the growing influence of corporations in society and assist communities in articulating what standards and behaviour they expect of companies.

Once strategies are decided upon, lines of responsibility and accountability must be clearly defined such that progress is monitored, measured and fed back into strategy development and reward schemes.  Rewarding executives for sustainability performance could be the answer to ensuring companies do what they promise. As the old saying goes, companies need to “put their money where their mouth is” – in more ways than one ».

Étude du Canadian Board sur l’adoption des rapports intégrés de gestion


Ce rapport examine le concept de l’intégration d’informations autre que financières dans les rapports de gestion et son degré d’adoption au niveau internationnal. On y discute des avantages, pour l’entreprise et la société, à divulguer des informations autres que financières telles que les données environnementales, sociales et de nature de gouvernance.

« Interest in and adoption of integrated reporting regarding a company’s financial and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance is growing rapidly. Although still largely a voluntary practice in most countries, it already is (South Africa) or soon will be (France) required of all listed companies. The European Union is poised to mandate ESG (environmental, social, and governance) reporting within the next year, a significant step toward mandated integrated reporting. The first company to issue an integrated report, nearly 10 years ago, was the Danish bio-industrial products company, Novozymes ».

« Today, a number of European companies are producing integrated reports and creating more integrated websites. Even a few U.S. companies, which historically have been notoriously risk averse to voluntary disclosures given heavy financial reporting requirements and fears of litigation, have started to practice integrated reporting ».

Rapport intégré de gestion – Conference Board