Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 9 juillet 2020


Comportements inadéquats d’un PDG lors des réunions du conseil d’administration


Voici un cas publié sur le site de Julie McLelland qui aborde une question de gouvernance relative aux comportements d’un PDG lors des réunions du conseil d’administration d’un OBNL.

Comme c’est souvent le cas, c’est un nouveau membre du CA qui a amorcé le questionnement sur la façon de se comporter du PDG lors des réunions.

Xuan, le nouvel administrateur, a constaté que le PDG voyageait souvent et qu’il n’y avait pas une politique de remboursement des frais le concernant.

Le fait d’aviser le président et de mettre cette question à l’ordre du jour a fait réagir fougueusement le PDG !

Xuan se demande comment il peut aider le président à trouver une issue à ce gâchis !

Le cas a d’abord été traduit en français en utilisant Google Chrome, puis, je l’ai édité et adapté. On y présente la situation de manière sommaire, puis trois experts se prononcent sur le cas.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont toujours les bienvenus.

Comportements inadéquats d’un PDG lors des réunions du conseil d’administration

 

Xuan a rejoint le conseil d’administration d’un organisme à but non lucratif (OBNL). Lors de sa première réunion, il a été stupéfait de l’attitude et du comportement du PDG ; celui-ci a tenté de diriger la réunion en disant aux administrateurs quand ils pouvaient parler, quand ils en avaient suffisamment discuté, et quel devait être le résultat ou la décision. Xuan a parlé au président après la réunion et ils ont convenu que ce n’était pas acceptable.

Xuan a rejoint le comité d’audit. Le PDG n’a pas assisté à la réunion du comité alors qu’il avait été invité. Le personnel ne savait pas où se trouvait le PDG et a laissé entendre qu’il était peut-être en voyage, car il voyageait « beaucoup ». Encore une fois, Xuan a discuté de la question avec le président et a découvert que le PDG voyageait fréquemment, réservait son propre voyage et réclamait des dépenses, que le directeur financier lui remboursait.

Pour la prochaine réunion du conseil d’administration, Xuan a préparé un document recommandant une politique de voyage comprenant des autorisations avant les réservations et l’approbation des remboursements par le président. Les déplacements et les remboursements du chef de la direction devaient être approuvés par le président et déposés pour information à la prochaine réunion du conseil.

Le document sur la politique des frais de voyages n’était pas dans le dossier envoyé avant la réunion. La discussion n’était pas non plus à l’ordre du jour. Xuan a de nouveau avisé le président qui lui a dit qu’il soulèverait la question avec le PDG. Deux heures plus tard, le PDG envoyait un courriel au conseil d’administration disant qu’il « démissionnait avec effet immédiat ». Au cours des prochaines heures, les administrateurs se sont envoyé des courriels et ils ont convenu qu’ils souhaitaient accepter la démission.

Le président a répondu en acceptant poliment la démission et en demandant une réunion pour discuter des détails administratifs. Le PDG a répondu qu’il était revenu sur sa décision de démission, estimant que le conseil d’administration minait son autorité. Celui-ci voulait être réintégré ou licencié avec les « avantages appropriés ».

Xuan n’a aucune formation en RH ou en droit. Comment peut-il aider la présidence à trouver une bonne solution à ce gâchis ?

Iain’s Answer

Hi Xuan,

Whew. You’ve walked into a wild party. I wish I could say it was unprecedented, but it’s not.  I’ve known more than one CEO who thought their job was to run the board. Others try to manipulate the board more subtly for their own ends. It won’t do.

There is a clear line of responsibility, by which the board is responsible to the shareholders (or the members of a non-profit association) for the good governance of the organisation.  One of the ways the board undertakes that role is by appointing, monitoring, and if necessary replacing, a CEO. To travel at the organisation’s expense without accountability is pretty flagrant, and your paper proposing proper accountability around this issue is quite appropriate. It is inexcusable that your proposal was dropped from the board papers without discussion.

A resignation cannot be retracted except by mutual agreement, and in your case the board had already agreed to accept the CEO’s resignation, and through its Chair had communicated this. You want to support your Chair.  It’s time to help him lance the boil and move on.  You can be a witness and backup when the Chair tells the CEO that there is no going back, the resignation has been accepted, and any amounts legally due to him on termination will be paid out.  Make sure there is good legal advice on exactly what should be said and paid.

Hold firm against any further bluster. And over the next few months the organisation will need stabilising, it will need a reliable acting CEO, and the board will need to find and engage the next CEO.  That’s a time of tension and high workload for your Chair.

When it’s all done, put it behind you and turn to face the future. Good luck.

Iain Massey is CEO of South West Leaders and Upland Consulting, he is also Chairman of AICD’s South West Regional Committee and Chairman of the Board of Forrest Personnel. He is based near Bunbury, in the south west of Western Australia.

Julie’s Answer

Xuan does not need an HR background to recognise that something is horribly wrong between this board and its CEO. The whole board should provide CEO oversight and Xuan can expect help from his board colleagues. His (quite correct) instinct to use policies to control expenditure may have triggered this incident but he is not responsible; this is not just for him and the Chair to resolve.

This could get nasty and Xuan must ensure emotion does not cause anyone to say or do something unhelpful. First the board should delegate the matter to a committee. They should get copies of the CEO’s contract, last performance review, and a list of all travel taken in the last year or two with the costs, destinations, duration, and purpose of trip. If there was a travel policy or prior agreement about travel the board should also get that.

Concurrent with getting this information they should appoint a specialist employment lawyer. This is important, even if the board has HR skills, or if the company has a senior HR manager; they need impartial expert advice.

All my experience tells me that the board should part company with this CEO. It may be cheaper to accept retraction of the resignation and then terminate for cause. It may be less disruptive to accept resignation rather than an accusatorial termination. The lawyer will help plot the best course.

An interim CEO may be appointed while the board begins a search for a permanent solution. The board should consider getting training to raise their skills in CEO oversight.

Julie Garland McLellan is a non-executive director and board consultant based in Sydney, Australia.

Richard’s Answer


The CEO resigning is the best thing that happened to the not for profit. The Board should not entertain any reversal of the CEO’s resignation whatsoever.

The Board needs to act swiftly and decisively. A protracted affair has the potential to harm the reputation of the not for profit, demoralise staff and ultimately be very expensive.

Given that the CEO is making allegations and demands Xuan should recommend that the Chairman engage an employment lawyer to guide the board as to their legal position and what they should do next to minimise any potential harm.

At the same time, the Board should instruct the CFO to investigate the CEO’s travel and all other expenditure for at least a couple of financial years. Sounds like the CEO may have something to hide and could be in breach of their contractual and other fiduciary obligations. The findings must be shared with the employment lawyer.

Once this matter is resolved the Board must take a deep and hard look at itself and consider why they let the CEO behave so inappropriately for so long.  At the same time, the Board will need to revisit the NFP’s policies and procedures playbook to ensure that money and time being spent by all staff is directed exclusively to furthering the mission of the NFP.

Finally, the Board must give careful consideration as to the attributes of their next CEO and how the hiring process should be conducted (from defining the position through to background verification) so that mistakes of making a bad hire are not repeated.

Richard Sterling is a Director of AltoPartners Australia. He is based in Sydney, Australia.

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 25 juin 2020


Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 4 juin 2020


Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 28 mai 2020


Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 21 mai 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 21 mai 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

 

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 7 mai 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 7 mai 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

 

Le recrutement d’administrateurs qualifiés au sein des CA d’OBNL | Un processus délicat !


Voici un cas publié sur le site de Julie McLelland qui aborde une question de gouvernance relative à la composition du conseil d’administration d’un OBNL.

Vance préside le conseil d’administration ; il a décidé d’exploiter les forces de son réseau de contacts et de s’impliquer personnellement dans le processus de recherche d’un nouvel administrateur.

Le processus de recherche conduit à la réception de deux excellentes candidatures, alors que l’on ne cherchait à pourvoir qu’un poste.

Vance se demande quelles considérations devraient orienter son action !

Le cas a d’abord été traduit en français en utilisant Google Chrome, puis, je l’ai édité et adapté. On y présente la situation de manière sommaire, puis trois experts se prononcent sur le cas.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont toujours les bienvenus.

Le recrutement d’administrateurs qualifiés au sein des CA d’OBNL | Un processus délicat !

 

Vance préside le conseil d’administration d’une entreprise à but lucratif non lucratif (OBNL) qui aide les enfants défavorisés. Comme de nombreux présidents d’OBNL, il essaie de réunir un conseil de bénévoles passionnés axé sur les compétences. Au cours des 12 derniers mois, il a recouru à son réseau pour trouver un avocat avec les bonnes passions et les bonnes compétences. 

Il y a deux mois, une connaissance l’a présenté à quelqu’un qui avait l’air parfait. L’introduction a été faite et le « futur administrateur » était tout ce que Vance avait espéré. La conversation s’est déplacée vers les familles et Vance a appris que la personne était mariée à un autre avocat avec une formation très similaire ; ils s’étaient rencontrés au travail et, bien qu’ils soient maintenant dans différentes entreprises, ils pratiquaient toujours dans des domaines similaires.

Vance a parlé au conseil d’administration de sa rencontre avec leur nouveau collègue potentiel et ils ont convenu que le futur administrateur recevrait un dossier de candidature et qu’il serait invité à se présenter aux élections.
Il y a cinq jours, Vance a reçu deux candidatures pour le poste. Les deux conjoints veulent rejoindre le conseil d’administration.

Ainsi le conseil, qui n’avait aucune expertise juridique en son sein, se retrouve avec deux candidatures d’avocats qualifiés lesquels possédant exactement le profil souhaité. Il n’est cependant pas certain de vouloir les deux personnes, ni comment choisir l’une d’entre elles, s’il ne prend pas les deux.

Réponse de Robert

 

It is not unusual for Chairs to scour their networks for potential directors. As many as 65% of director roles in Australia are filled without going to a formal recruitment stage, so Vance’s dilemma is not uncommon. For Vance, his challenge comes in the form of practicing good leadership and ensuring good governance practices.

There are two levels of conflict for Vance to consider. Vance has a potential internal conflict of not wanting to hurt anyone which may impair his judgement. Vance also has a potential conflict of interest as he has met the directors individually outside of a formal nominations process and has formed a somewhat biased view, i.e. this is the perfect director to fill this position.
Working in the best interest of the organisation, I would advise Vance to immediately step back and hand over the process to an independent director or (nomination) committee to ensure proper process. He also needs to be clear that the final decision will be a joint one, not his alone.

Although the prospect of recruiting two highly sought-after directors to your non-profit board is tantalising, the board and/or committee should consult their skills matrix, review the role requirements, and decide if they actually need two lawyers. They should also consider broader factors such as relevance of past experience, diversity and interpersonal skills.
The board could also consider offering a position on a committee for the unsuccessful candidate with a view of nomination at the next intake.

In the worst case scenario having aligned directors, such as family members, can impair independence in discussion and decision making, create voting blocks and hamper processes if one director needs to be stood down. If both are appointed, I would advise the whole board to discuss and develop strategies to minimise these types of issues before they arise.

__________________________

Robert Crowe is Chairman of Connect Child and Family Services and Managing Director of Leading for Purpose. He is based in Sydney , Australia.

 

Réponse de Julie

 

There is no law against married couples being members of the same board. This is rarely covered in constitutions although some constitutions require directors to be independent of other directors and members of staff.

Directors must act independently of each other and never act as a unit. Having a voting block, even if only two, seriously reduces a board’s ability to reach informed consensus.

The board needs to access diverse skills and experiences to enrich debate and enhance decision-making. Two board members from the same generation, with similar professional backgrounds and skills, and living in the same geographic and socio-economic environment, inevitably reduces overall board diversity.

People aren’t lego-bricks. Feelings may be hurt if he declines one candidate. Vance could be in a situation where his board gets both or neither.

Vance needs to balance the undoubted value that these candidates offer against the next skills needed under his board’s succession plan. Can the board operate effectively without those skills? What will be the impact on the projected skills matrix for the next nine years?

Finally Vance needs to evaluate the board’s processes. Does the nomination pack suggest that completing the paperwork automatically leads to standing for election (or appointment to a casual vacancy)? Does the board want to include a nominations committee to get more strategic in targeting skills? How are conflicts of interest registered, declared and managed? Is the current process good enough to handle issues arising from a married couple both on the board? Can the chair manage discussions well enough?

If the systems and succession plan can cope Vance should cope also.

____________________________

Julie Garland McLellan is a non-executive director and board consultant based in Sydney, Australia.

Réponse de Keith

 

Having a married couple in any organization has its challenges and certainly this is no different on a Board of Directors.

It is advisable to always be sure to undergo an independent search process to insure that your organization is seeing the top talent the market has to offer, unbiassed consul on available candidates and a proven process for selection.

In this case, consider: why this family have a passion for this organization? what is reasoning for them both to apply? Posing these questions to them, you may find one of the spouses withdraws rather quickly when they speak to each other. Assuming they are of equal abilities and fit, this removes the dilemma. If they have solid reasoning it becomes trickier.

Having a married couple on a board would certainly create potential conflict of interest. On the other hand (as most married couples would attest to) they don’t always agree and could work in a constructive and absolutely independent manner. A major consideration also is the size, breadth and revenue of your NFP and are there major contracts awarded? If so, can they be in anyway influenced by the board? This being the case, it could be called into question if a contract is awarded where they have some personal gain. Even though this conflict is no different than on any board of directors, it could create a major issue.

If the board has two seats available don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. So long as their intentions are sound and their skills are relevant. This could provide your organization with a power couple fundraising/PR “dynamic duo”.

___________________________

Keith Labbett is Co-founder and Co-chair of The Canadian University Mens Rugby Championship and Managing Partner of  Osprey Executive Search. He is based in Toronto, Canada.

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 16 avril 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 16 avril 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

 

Le dilemme d’un administrateur indépendant dans un cas de vol de données


Voici un cas publié sur le site de Julie McLelland qui aborde une situation où Trevor, un administrateur indépendant, croyait que le grand succès de l’entreprise était le reflet d’une solide gouvernance.

Trevor préside le comité d’audit et il se soucie de mettre en place de saines pratiques de gouvernance. Cependant, cette société cotée en bourse avait des failles en matière de gestion des risques numériques et de cybersécurité.

De plus, le seul administrateur indépendant n’a pas été informé qu’un vol de données très sensibles avait été fait et que des demandes de rançons avaient été effectuées.

L’organisation a d’abord nié que les informations subtilisées provenaient de leurs systèmes, avant d’admettre que les données avaient été fichées un an auparavant ! Les résultats furent dramatiques…

Trevor se demande comment il peut aider l’organisation à affronter la tempête !

Le cas a d’abord été traduit en français en utilisant Google Chrome, puis, je l’ai édité et adapté. On y présente la situation de manière sommaire puis trois experts se prononcent sur le cas.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont toujours les bienvenus.

Le dilemme d’un administrateur indépendant dans un cas de vol de données

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trevor est administrateur d’une société cotée qui a été un «chouchou du marché». La société fournit des évaluations de crédit et une vérification des données. Les fondateurs ont tous deux une solide expérience dans le secteur et un solide réseau de contacts et à une liste de clients qui comprenait des gouvernements et des institutions financières.

Après l’entrée en bourse, il y a deux ans, la société a atteint ou dépassé les prévisions et Trevor est fier d’être le seul administrateur indépendant siégeant au conseil d’administration aux côtés des deux fondateurs et du PDG. Il préside le comité d’audit et, officieusement, il a été l’initiateur des processus de gouvernance et de sa documentation.

Les fondateurs sont restés très actifs dans l’entreprise et Trevor s’est parfois inquiété du fait que certaines décisions stratégiques n’avaient pas été portées à son attention avant la réunion du conseil d’administration. Comme l’expérience de Trevor est l’audit et l’assurance, il suppose qu’il n’aurait pas ajouté de valeur au-delà de la garantie d’un processus sain et de la tenue de registres.

Il y a trois semaines, tout a changé. Une grande partie des données de l’entreprise ont été subtilisées et transférées sur le « dark web ». Ce vol comprenait les données financières des personnes qui avaient été évaluées ainsi que des données d’identification tels que les numéros de dossier fiscal et les adresses résidentielles. Pire, la société a d’abord affirmé que les informations ne provenaient pas de leurs systèmes, puis a admis avoir reçu des demandes de rançon indiquant que les données avaient été fichées jusqu’à un an avant cette catastrophe.

Plusieurs clients ont fermé leur compte, les actionnaires sont consternés, le cours de l’action est en chute libre et la presse réclame plus d’informations.

Comment Trevor devrait-il aider l’entreprise à surmonter cette tempête ?

Pour prendre connaissance de ce cas, rendez-vous sur www.mclellan.com.au/newsletter.html et cliquez sur « lire le dernier numéro ».

Adam’s Answer

 

This is a critical time for Trevor legally and reputationally, it is also a time when being an independent director carries additional responsibility to the company, the shareholders, the staff and the customers.

All Directors and Executives can only have one response to a blackmail attempt.  That is to immediately report it to the police and not respond to the ransomware demands.  Secondly the company should have had a crisis management plan in place ready for such an eventuality.  In this day and age, no company should operate without a cybercrime contingency plan.

In this case it is unclear, but it appears that the authorities were not informed and that Trevor’s company was unprepared for a data breach or ransomware demands.

There are 2 scenarios open to Trevor:

1) If Trevor was not informed straight away of the ransom demands and the CEO and founding Executive Directors knew but did not brief him on the ransom issue and the company’s response, then his independent status has been compromised and he should resign.

2) If Trevor was informed and the whole Board was involved in the response, then Trevor must remain and help the company ride out the storm.   This will involve working with the police, the ASX and crisis management guidance from external suppliers – technical and PR. 

The rule to follow is full transparency and speedy action. 

Trevor should refer to the recent ransomware attack on Toll Logistics and their response which was exemplary.

Adam Salzer OAM is the Chair and Global Designer for Whitewater Transformations. His other board experience includes Australian Transformation and Turnaround Association (AusTTA), Asian Transformation and Turnaround Association (ATTA), Australian Deafness Council, Bell Shakespeare Company, and NSW Deaf Society. He is based in Sydney, Australia.

Julie’s Answer

 

This is a listed company; Trevor must ensure appropriate disclosure. A trading halt may give the company time to investigate, and respond to, the events and then give the market time to disseminate the information. His customer liaison at the stock exchange should assist with implementing a halt and issuing a brief statement saying what has happened and that the company will issue more information when it becomes available.

This will be a costly and distracting exercise that could derail the company from its current successful track.

Three of the four board members are executives. That doesn’t mean the fourth can rely on their efforts. Trevor must add value by asking intelligent questions that people involved in the operations will possibly not think to ask. This board must work as a team rather than a group of individuals who each contribute their own expertise and then come together to document decisions that were not made rigorously or jointly.

Trevor has now learnt that there is more to good governance than just having meetings and documenting processes. He needs to get involved and truly understand the business. If his fellow directors do not welcome this, he needs to consider whether they are taking him seriously or just using him as window-dressing. He should ensure that the whole board is never again left out of the information flow when something important happens (or even when it perhaps might happen).

He should also take the lead on procuring legal advice (they are going to need it), liaising with the regulators, and establishing crisis communications. Engaging a specialist communications firm may help.

Julie Garland McLellan is a non-executive director and board consultant based in Sydney, Australia.

Jinan’s Answer

 

I recommend three separate parallel streams of work for Trevor. 

1. Immediate public facing actions
Immediately apologize and state your commitment to your customers.  Hire a PR firm and have the most public facing person issue an apology. The person selected to issue the apology has to be selected carefully (cannot be the person responsible for leak, and has potential to become the new trusted CEO)

2. Tactical internal actions
Assess the damage and contain the incident.  Engage an incident response firm to assess how the breach happened, when it happened, what was stolen. Confirm that leak doors are closed. Select your IR firm carefully – the better reputed they are, the better you will look in litigation.
Conduct an immediate audit and investigation. You need to understand who knew, when and why this was buried for a year.
Take disciplinary action against anyone who was part of the breach. Post audit, either allow them to keep their equity or buy them out.

3. Strategic actions
Review and update your cybersecurity incident response process.  This includes your ransomware processes (e.g. will you pay, how you pay, etc.), and how you communicate incidents. 
Build cybersecurity awareness, behavior and culture up, down and across your company.  Ensure that everyone from the board down are educated, enabled and enthusiastic about their own and your company’s cyber-safety. This is a journey not a one-off miracle.
Extend cybersecurity engagement to your customers. Be proactive not only on the status of this incident, but also on how you are keeping their data safe.  Go a step further and offer them help in their own cyber-safety.
Create a forward thinking, business and risk-aligned cybersecurity strategy. Understand your current people, process and technology gaps which led to this decision and how you’ll fix them.
Elevate the role of cybersecurity leadership.  You will need a chief information security officer who is empowered to execute the strategy, and has a regular and independent seat at the board table. 

Jinan Budge is Principal Analyst Serving Security and Risk Professionals at Forrester and a former Director Cyber Security, Strategy and Governance at Transport for NSW. She is based in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 27 février 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 27 février 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "top 10"

Vous siégez à un conseil d’administration | Comment bien se comporter ?


Johanne Bouchard* a eu l’occasion d’agir à titre d’auteure invitée sur mon blogue en gouvernance de nombreuses fois depuis 5 ans.

Cet article de Johanne a été visionné de multiples fois sur mon site ; c’est pourquoi je vous propose de revisiter ce billet qui a aussi été publié sur son blogue en français https://www.johannebouchard.com/

L’auteure a une solide expérience d’interventions de consultation auprès de conseils d’administration de sociétés américaines et d’accompagnements auprès de hauts dirigeants de sociétés publiques. Dans ce billet, elle aborde ce que, selon elle, doivent être les qualités des bons administrateurs.

Quels conseils, simples et concrets, une personne qui connaît bien la nature des conseils d’administration peut-elle prodiguer aux administrateurs eu égard aux qualités et aux comportements à adopter dans leurs rôles de fiduciaires ?

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont les bienvenus.

Siéger à un conseil d’administration : comment exceller ?

par

Johanne Bouchard

 

C’est un privilège de servir au sein d’un conseil d’administration. Servir au sein d’un conseil est l’occasion de vraiment faire une différence dans la vie des gens, puisque les décisions que vous prenez peuvent avoir un effet significatif, non seulement sur l’entreprise, mais aussi sur les individus, les familles, et même sur les communautés entières.

Vous êtes un intervenant-clé dans l’orientation et la stratégie globale, qui, à son tour, détermine le succès de l’entreprise et crée de la valeur ajoutée pour les actionnaires.

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « johanne bouchard »

 

En 2014, Bryan Stolle, un des contributeurs de la revue Forbes, également investisseur au Mohr Davidow Ventures, a examiné le sujet dans un billet de son blogue. Il a écrit : « L’excellence d’un conseil d’administration est le résultat de l’excellence de chacun de ses membres ». Il poursuit en soulignant ce qu’il considère en être les principaux attributs. Je suis d’accord avec lui, mais j’aimerais ajouter ce qui, selon moi, fait la grandeur et la qualité exceptionnelle d’un membre de conseil d’administration.

Intention

 

D’abord et avant tout, être un excellent membre de conseil d’administration commence avec « l’intention » d’en être un, avec l’intention d’être bienveillant, et pas uniquement avec l’intention de faire partie d’un conseil d’administration. Malheureusement, trop de membres ne sont pas vraiment résolus et déterminés dans leur volonté de devenir membres d’un conseil.

La raison de se joindre à un conseil doit être authentique, avec un désir profond de bien servir l’entité. Être clair sur les raisons qui vous poussent à vous joindre au conseil est absolument essentiel, et cela aide à poser les jalons de votre réussite comme administrateur.

En adhérant à un conseil d’administration, votre devoir, ainsi que celui de vos collègues-administrateurs, est de créer une valeur ajoutée pour les actionnaires.

Attentes

 

Ensuite, vous devez comprendre ce que l’on attend de vous et du rôle que vous serez appelé à jouer au sein du conseil d’administration. Trop de membres d’un conseil ne comprennent pas leur rôle et saisissent mal les attentes liées à leurs tâches. Souvent, le président du conseil et le chef de la direction ne communiquent pas suffisamment clairement leurs attentes concernant leur rôle.

Ne tenez rien pour acquis concernant le temps que vous devrez consacrer à cette fonction et ce qu’on attendra de votre collaboration. Dans quelle mesure devez-vous être présent à toutes les réunions, que vous siégiez à un comité ou que vous participiez aux conférences téléphoniques entre les réunions normalement prévues ? Votre réseau suffit-il, à ce stade-ci de la croissance de l’entreprise, pour répondre au recrutement de nouveaux talents et pour créer des partenariats ? Est-ce que votre expérience de l’industrie est adéquate ; comment serez-vous un joueur-clé lors des discussions ? Y aura-t-il un programme d’accueil et d’intégration des nouveaux administrateurs pour faciliter votre intégration au sein du conseil ?

De plus, comment envisagez-vous d’atteindre un niveau suffisant de connaissance des stratégies commerciales de l’entreprise ? Soyez clairs en ce qui concerne les attentes.

Exécution

 

Vous devez honorer les engagements associés à votre responsabilité de membre du conseil d’administration. Cela signifie :

Être préparé : se présenter à une réunion du conseil d’administration sans avoir lu l’ordre du jour au préalable ainsi que les documents qui l’accompagnent est inacceptable. Cela peut paraître évident, mais vous seriez surpris du nombre de membres de conseils coupables d’un tel manque de préparation. De même, le chef de la direction, soucieux d’une gestion efficace du temps, a la responsabilité de s’assurer que le matériel est adéquatement préparé et distribué à l’avance à tous les administrateurs.

Respecter le calendrier : soyez à l’heure et assistez à toutes les réunions du conseil d’administration.

Participation

 

Écoutez, questionnez et ne prenez la parole qu’au moment approprié. Ne cherchez pas à provoquer la controverse uniquement dans le but de vous faire valoir, en émettant un point de vue qui n’est ni opportun ni pertinent. N’intervenez pas inutilement, sauf si vous avez une meilleure solution ou des choix alternatifs à proposer.

Bonnes manières

 

Il est important de faire preuve de tact, même lorsque vous essayez d’être directs. Évitez les manœuvres d’intimidation ; le dénigrement et le harcèlement n’ont pas leur place au sein d’une entreprise, encore moins dans une salle du conseil. Soyez respectueux, en particulier pendant la présentation du comité de direction. Placez votre cellulaire en mode discrétion. La pratique de bonnes manières, notamment les comportements respectueux, vous permettra de gagner le respect des autres.

Faites valoir vos compétences

 

Vos compétences sont uniques. Cherchez à les présenter de manière à ce que le conseil d’administration puisse en apprécier les particularités. En mettant pleinement à profit vos compétences et en participant activement aux réunions, vous renforcerez la composition du conseil et vous participerez également à la réussite de l’entreprise en créant une valeur ajoutée pour les actionnaires.

Ne soyez pas timide

 

Compte tenu de la nature stratégique de cette fonction, vous devez avoir le courage de faire connaître votre point de vue. Un bon membre de conseil d’administration ne doit pas craindre d’inciter les autres membres à se tenir debout lorsqu’il est conscient des intérêts en cause ni d’être celui qui saura clairement faire preuve de discernement. Un bon membre de conseil d’administration doit être prêt à accomplir les tâches les plus délicates, y compris celles qui consistent à changer la direction de l’entreprise et le chef de la direction, quand c’est nécessaire, et avant qu’il ne soit trop tard.

Évitez les réclamations financières non justifiées

 

Soyez conscients des émoluments d’administrateur qu’on vous paie. N’abusez pas des privilèges. Les conséquences sont beaucoup trop grandes pour vous, pour la culture de l’entreprise et pour la réputation du conseil. Si vous voulez que je sois plus précise, je fais référence aux déclarations de certaines dépenses que vous devriez payer vous-même.

Sachez qu’un employé du service de la comptabilité examine vos allocations de dépenses, et que cela pourrait facilement ternir votre réputation si vous soumettiez des dépenses inacceptables.

Faites preuve de maturité

 

Vous vous joignez à un conseil qui agit au plus haut niveau des entreprises (privée, publique ou à but non lucratif), dont les actions et les interventions ont une grande incidence sur les collectivités en général. Gardez confidentiel ce qui est partagé lors des réunions du conseil, et ne soyez pas la source d’une fuite.

Maintenez une bonne conduite

 

Le privilège de siéger au sein d’un conseil d’administration vous expose à une grande visibilité. Soyez conscients de votre comportement lors des réunions du conseil d’administration et à l’extérieur de la salle de réunion ; évitez de révéler certains de vos comportements inopportuns.

Confiance et intégrité

 

Faites ce que vous avez promis de faire. Engagez-vous à respecter ce que vous promettez. Tenez votre parole. Soyez toujours à votre meilleur et soyez fier d’être un membre respectable du conseil d’administration.

Valeurs

 

Un bon membre de conseil d’administration possède des valeurs qu’il ne craint pas de révéler. Il est sûr que ses agissements reflètent ses valeurs.

Un bon membre de conseil est un joueur actif et, comme Stolle l’a si bien noté, de bons administrateurs constituent l’assise d’un bon conseil d’administration. Ce conseil d’administration abordera sans hésiter les enjeux délicats, tels que la rémunération du chef de la direction et la planification de la relève — des éléments qui sont trop souvent négligés.

Un bon membre du conseil d’administration devrait se soucier d’être un modèle et une source d’inspiration en exerçant sa fonction, que ce soit à titre d’administrateur indépendant, de président, de vice-président, de président du conseil, d’administrateur principal, de président de comité, il devrait avoir la maturité et la sagesse nécessaires pour se retirer d’un conseil d’administration avec grâce, quand vient le temps opportun de le faire.

Enfin, prenez soin de ne pas être un membre dysfonctionnel, ralentissant les progrès du conseil d’administration. En tant qu’administrateur indépendant, vous aurez le même devoir qu’un joueur d’équipe.

Je vous invite à aspirer à être un bon membre de conseil d’administration et à respecter vos engagements. Siéger à un trop grand nombre de conseils ne fera pas de vous un meilleur membre.

Je conduis des évaluations du rendement des conseils d’administration, et je vous avoue, en toute sincérité, que de nombreux administrateurs me font remarquer que certains de leurs collègues semblent se disperser et qu’ils ne sont pas les administrateurs auxquels on est en droit de s’attendre. Vous ne pouvez pas vous permettre de trop « étirer l’élastique » si vous voulez pleinement honorer vos engagements.

Rappelez-vous que c’est acceptable de dire « non » à certaines demandes, d’être sélectif quant à ce que vous souhaitez faire, mais il est vital de bien accomplir votre tâche dans le rôle que vous tenez.


*Johanne Bouchard est maintenant consultante auprès de conseils d’administration, de chefs de la direction et de comités de direction. Johanne a développé une expertise au niveau de la dynamique et de la composition d’un conseil d’administration. Après l’obtention de son diplôme d’ingénieure en informatique, sa carrière l’a menée à œuvrer dans tous les domaines du secteur de la technologie, du marketing et de la stratégie à l’échelle mondiale.

Le modèle de gouvernance canadien donne la primauté aux Stakeholders | Le modèle de Wall Street donne la primauté aux actionnaires !


Shareholder Governance, “Wall Street” and the View from Canada

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "business roundtable"

The Business Roundtable, a group of executives of major corporations in the United States, recently released a statement on the purpose of a corporation that reflects a shift from shareholder primacy to a commitment to all stakeholders. While the statement seems radical to some, it is consistent with recent Canadian corporate law. Boards of directors in Canada have had to make decisions incorporating the concepts expressed in the Business Roundtable statement for over a decade.

The primary concern expressed by those opposed to a shift from shareholder primacy is that it undercuts managerial accountability, thereby resulting in increased agency costs and undermining the overall effectiveness and efficiency of corporations. The experience in Canada suggests such concerns are largely overblown.

A stakeholder-based governance model rejects the idea that corporations exist principally to serve shareholders. Instead, a stakeholder-based governance model requires the consideration of various stakeholder groups to inform directors as to what is in the best interest of the corporation.

The move to a stakeholder-based governance model is largely the result of general dissatisfaction with the shareholder primacy model, under which:

    • Management and boards felt intense pressure to focus on short-term results at the expense of long-term success;
    • Communities and workers often felt ignored or abandoned;
    • Customers felt unsatisfied with product quality and customer service;
    • And suppliers felt threatened and pressured to drive down costs, even if doing so requires reducing quality or moving offshore.

Indeed, the introduction of the statement by the Business Roundtable provides that:

Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity. We believe the free-market system is the best means of generating good jobs, a strong and sustainable economy, innovation, a healthy environment and economic opportunity for all.

Put differently, a stakeholder model reflects a rejection of the Gordon Gekko ethos from the 1987 movie “Wall Street” that “greed, for lack of a better word, is good.”

The 2008 Supreme Court of Canada decision in BCE Inc. v 1976 Debentureholders rejected Revlon duties to maximize shareholder value in connection with a change of control transaction. In its decision, the court specifically provided that “the fiduciary duty of the directors to the corporation originated in common law. It is a duty to act in the best interests of the corporation. Often the interests of shareholders and stakeholders are co-extensive with the interests of the corporation. But if they conflict, the directors’ duty is clear—it is to the corporation.”

The thinking in the BCE decision has now been reflected in Canada’s federal corporate statute, which provides that that, when acting with a view to the best interests of the corporation, directors may consider, without limitation, the interests of shareholders, employees, retirees and pensioners, creditors, consumers and governments; the environment; and the long-term interests of the corporation.

At its most basic level, the move away from shareholder primacy better reflects the history and animating principles of corporate law, which establish that a corporation is a separate legal person and its shareholders are not owners of its assets per se, but investors with certain contractual and statutory rights (including a right to elect directors and a residual claim on the assets). That distinction―that shareholders are not owners in the classic sense―is of fundamental importance and gets to the heart of corporate governance and the role of boards. Indeed, the seminal work of Berle and Means, which has influenced a generation of corporate governance scholars, is focused exactly on the separation of ownership and control.

When the BCE decision first came out in Canada some expressed concern that a focus on the corporation provides no meaningful guidance for boards of directors. That concern has not manifested itself. The experience of advising boards following BCE has not been one of confusion or uncertainty―that’s not to say decisions are easy, but well-advised boards of directors understand and act in accordance with their fiduciary duties as expressed by BCE.

It is also worth pointing out that a singular focus on shareholders does not provide clear guidance to boards of directors. In a modern public company, shareholders come and go, each with their own investment criteria and objectives.

As a practical matter, in Canada, a stakeholder model allows directors to exercise their business judgment to consider the interests of stakeholders, to the extent those directors have an informed basis for believing that doing so will contribute to the long-term success and value of the corporation. However, in the context of a change of control transaction, much of the focus rightly remains on what consideration shareholders will receive.

As long as directors fulfill their duties of loyalty and due care when considering the interests and reasonable expectations of the corporation’s stakeholders, the business judgment rule protects Canadian directors from liability. Minutes of meetings should reflect, where appropriate, that directors considered such factors as reputation of the corporation, legal and regulatory risk, investments in employees, the environment and any other matter that could affect the success or value of the corporation.

Other factors that help address concerns of those who fear a stakeholder-based governance system is that the market for corporate control remains healthy and, since Canadian securities law does not permit a “just say no” defense, the threat of an unsolicited offer being made directly to shareholders is always present. In addition, product markets and reputational pressures also provide meaningful incentives to promote responsible and disciplined management. And perhaps most important, shareholders retain their most basic and powerful right in the stakeholder model: they elect the board of directors and can change the board if they are dissatisfied with its performance.

So, to our friends in the United States, we encourage you to consider the experience here in Canada before concluding that the ideas put forth by the Business Roundtable will undermine the effectiveness of your public corporations.

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 13 février 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 13 février 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai choisi dix billets d’intérêt. Il y a plusieurs rapports sur la gouvernance qui sont publiés en début d’année.

J’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Top 10 predictions for Thailand 2020 | The Thaiger
  1. 2020 Governance Outlook
  2. Private Equity—Year in Review and 2020 Outlook
  3. Strengthening the Board’s Effectiveness in 2020: A Framework for Board Evaluations
  4. Leading Boards Rethinking Strategy and Enabling Innovation
  5. Year in Review: Delaware Corporate Law and Litigation
  6. Accelerating ESG Disclosure—World Economic Forum Task Force
  7. S&P 500 CEO Compensation Increase Trends
  8. Core Principles of Exculpation and Director Independence
  9. Let’s Get Concrete About Stakeholder Capitalism
  10. Technology and Life Science 2019 IPO Report

Top 15 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 6 février 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 6 février 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai choisi plusieurs billets d’intérêt. C’est normal, car c’est le début de l’année 2020 et il y a plusieurs rapports sur la gouvernance qui sont publiés à la fin du premier mois.

J’ai relevé les quinze principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "top 15"

 

 

  1. Navigating the ESG Landscape
  2. 2019 Year-End Securities Enforcement Update
  3. IAC Recommendation Concerning SEC Guidance and Rule Proposals on Proxy Advisors and Shareholder Proposals
  4. SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspection: Examination Priorities for 2020
  5. 2020 Compensation Committee Handbook
  6. Supreme Court Is Asked to Weaken the SEC’s Ability to “Make Things Right”: Amici Curiae Brief
  7. CEO Letter to Board Members Concerning 2020 Proxy Voting Agenda
  8. White-Collar and Regulatory Enforcement: What Mattered in 2019 and What to Expect in 2020
  9. Governance of Corporate Insider Equity Trades
  10. Confidential Treatment Applications and SEC Disclosure Guidance
  11. Advance Notice Bylaw and Activists Board Nominees
  12. The Economics of Shareholder Proposal Rules
  13. ISS Comment Letter on Amendments to Exemptions from the Proxy Rules for Proxy Voting Advice
  14. Glass Lewis Comment Letter to the SEC About Proposed Proxy Rules for Proxy Voting Advice
  15. The Economics of Regulating Proxy Advisors

 

Top 15 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 30 janvier 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 30  janvier 2020.

Cette semaine, j’ai choisi plusieurs billets d’intérêt. C’est normal, car c’est le début de l’année 2020 et il y a plusieurs rapports sur la gouvernance qui sont publiés à la fin du premier mois.

J’ai relevé les quinze principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Image associée

 

  1. NACD Public Company Board Governance Survey
  2. Shareholder Activism in 2020: New Risks and Opportunities for Boards
  3. Making Corporate Social Responsibility Pay
  4. SEC Year-End Guidance
  5. Companies’ Anti-Fraternization Policies: Key Considerations
  6. S&P 1500 2019 Bonus Expectations and a Look to 2020
  7. Female Directors in California-Headquartered Public Companies
  8. Sustainability in the Spotlight
  9. ESG Performance and Disclosure: A Cross-Country Analysis
  10. Board Composition and Shareholder Proposals
  11. Challenging Times: The Hardening D&O Insurance Market
  12. Foundational Principles in an Evolving Governance Environment
  13. 2019 Sustainability Report
  14. Audit Committee Perspectives on Audit Quality and Assessment: A PCAOB Report
  15. 2019 Review of Shareholder Activism

 

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 16 janvier 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 16  janvier 2020.

Comme à l’habitude, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « governance 2020 »

 

 

  1. CalSTRS Green Initiative Task Force Annual Report
  2. Bernie Ebbers and Board Oversight of the Office of Legal Affairs
  3. Delaware Appraisal Decisions
  4. Corporate Culture: Evidence from the Field
  5. Into the Mainstream: ESG at the Tipping Point
  6. Eight Priorities for Boards in 2020
  7. Startup Governance
  8. ESG Matters
  9. Corporate Law for Good People
  10. Embracing the New Paradigm
  11. A Fundamental Reshaping of Finance

 

 

Top 10 de Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance au 3 janvier 2020


Voici le compte rendu hebdomadaire du forum de la Harvard Law School sur la gouvernance corporative au 3 janvier 2020.

Je profite de l’occasion pour vous souhaiter une formidable année 2020 et la mise en place de pratiques exemplaires de gouvernance.

Comme à l’habitude, j’ai relevé les dix principaux billets.

Bonne lecture !

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « 2020 »

 

  1. Institutional Trading around Corporate News: Evidence from Textual Analysis
  2. Managerial Control Benefits and Takeover Market Efficiency
  3. Public Company vs. JV Governance
  4. New Considerations for Special Litigation Committees
  5. Worker Representation on U.S. Corporate Boards
  6. Board-Shareholder Engagement Practices
  7. The Plight of Women in Positions of Corporate Leadership in the United States, the European Union, and Japan: Differing Laws and Cultures, Similar Issues
  8. Institutional Investment Mandates: Anchors for Long-term Performance
  9. NYSE Proposal for Primary Direct Listings
  10. A New Dataset of Historical States of Incorporation of U.S. Stocks 1994-2019

 

Problématiques de gouvernance communes lors d’interventions-conseils auprès de diverses organisations – Partie II – La présidence du CA


Lors de mes consultations en gouvernance des sociétés, je constate que j’interviens souvent sur des problématiques communes à un grand nombre d’organisations et qui sont cruciales pour l’exercice d’une gouvernance exemplaire.

Dans cette deuxième partie, j’aborde la définition des fonctions du président du conseil d’administration (PCA) d’une société.

L’article d’André Laurin intitulé « La fonction de président de CA» est certes l’un des textes les plus complets pour décrire les fonctions de président du conseil d’administration.

Dans ce document, l’auteur précise le « contexte et l’encadrement réglementaire et jurisprudentiel » en insistant sur le rôle crucial du PCA et sur le rehaussement des règles de gouvernance, entre autres la dissociation des fonctions de PCA et de PDG.

Voici de longs extraits de cet article.

La fonction de président de CA

 

Le leadership de la présidence – Collège des administrateurs de sociétés

 

Contexte et encadrement législatif réglementaire et jurisprudentiel

Rôle vital et hausse des normes de fonctionnement

Le président du conseil joue un rôle vital au sein d’une société. Ce rôle et les
responsabilités qui en découlent ont pris une importance accrue avec la hausse des normes de fonctionnement applicables aux conseils d’administration et, par conséquent, aux administrateurs. L’adoption de règles et de lignes directrices dans le cas des émetteurs assujettis, ou de directives dans le cas de certaines sociétés d’État, la publicité des pratiques exemplaires en matière de régie d’entreprise et les poursuites plus fréquentes intentées contre les administrateurs se sont conjuguées pour provoquer cette hausse des normes.

Parmi ces normes, on retrouve en première ligne dans le cas des émetteurs assujettis et de certaines sociétés d’État beaucoup de règles de divulgation, de contrôles et de conformité et une importance considérable accordée à la notion d’indépendance.

Les règles ont eu pour effet secondaire d’accroître la lourdeur administrative et les coûts pour les émetteurs assujettis et de susciter une image, à certains égards, négative de la gouvernance dans plusieurs milieux. Il importe de ne pas confondre ces règles avec la bonne gouvernance ni la conformité avec l’intégrité. Les premiers sont des moyens, à l’occasion exagérés, alors que les seconds sont des objectifs, toujours valables, que les sociétés doivent
rechercher.

Quant au critère d’indépendance, il ne devrait pas être érigé en valeur absolue et principale et, sous réserve de l’utile séparation des pouvoirs avec la direction dans nombre de cas, ne devrait pas céder le pas aux critères de compétence, d’expérience, de crédibilité, de légitimité et d’intégrité. De plus, la possibilité de certains conflits ponctuels d’intérêts ne devrait pas faire perdre automatiquement la qualification d’administrateur indépendant pour cette seule raison.

Yvan Allaire, président de l’Institut sur la gouvernance d’organisations privées et publiques et son coauteur Dr Mihaela Firsirotu ont bien résumé, dans une courte phrase, les limites à l’utilisation du critère d’indépendance « Le concept est sans intérêt quand il est mesurable et insaisissable quand il est intéressant ».

Élimination progressive du cumul des fonctions de chef de la direction et de président du conseil

Pendant plusieurs années et dans le cas de plusieurs sociétés, le président et chef de la direction occupait également le poste de président du conseil. Ce cumul de fonctions était très fréquent chez les émetteurs assujettis américains, mais moins fréquent chez les émetteurs assujettis canadiens.

Les dernières statistiques publiées par le Risk Metrics Group révèlent que 45 % des émetteurs assujettis américains n’octroient plus les deux postes à la même personne (environ 36 % des « Standard & Poors —500 companies » selon Corporate Library, un groupe de recherche de Portland, Maine).

Au Canada, le cumul est beaucoup moins fréquent chez les émetteurs assujettis. Selon un rapport de Patrick O’Callaghan et Associés, publié en décembre 2006 en partenariat avec Korn/Ferry International, 79 % des plus importants émetteurs assujettis canadiens avaient en 2005 un président de conseil ou un leader indépendant du conseil (c.-à-d. distinct du chef de la direction).

En ce qui a trait aux sociétés fermées à but lucratif, le cumul est encore une pratique très répandue et va nécessairement le demeurer dans la plupart des cas compte tenu de la réalité de l’entreprise, de sa direction et de son actionnariat. En effet, dans le cas de ces sociétés, l’actionnaire ou les actionnaires principaux sont très souvent les dirigeants de la société et exercent donc directement le contrôle sur celle-ci.

Quant aux OSBL, le cumul a été et demeure l’exception plutôt que la règle.

Nos commentaires sont donc surtout pertinents dans le cas des émetteurs assujettis, des OSBL et de certaines sociétés fermées à but lucratif (c.-à-d., celles comportant plusieurs actionnaires et qui n’ont pas de convention unanime d’actionnaires ou qui, ayant une telle convention, ont opté pour le non-cumul des fonctions).

On peut résumer comme suit un des arguments des tenants du non-cumul moins grande est l’implication de la majorité sinon de la totalité des actionnaires ou membres dans la gestion quotidienne de la société et plus forte devrait être la préférence pour le non-cumul des fonctions.

En effet, le non-cumul vise, entre autres, à permettre aux actionnaires ou membres d’exercer une surveillance adéquate de la direction et de la gestion quotidienne déléguée. La capacité d’exercer un jugement indépendant constitue un autre fondement de la position des partisans du non-cumul.

Silence relatif des lois sur le président du conseil et sur ses responsabilités particulières

Ni la Loi sur les compagnies (Québec) ne traitent des responsabilités du président du conseil. La Loi sur la gouvernance des sociétés d’État (Québec) régissant les sociétés d’État du gouvernement du Québec, prescrit, quant à elle, l’exigence d’indépendance du président du conseil et lui confie certaines tâches précises sans pour autant énoncer un mandat précis ou une description de tâches complète.

Les lignes directrices adoptées par les Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, qui font partie de l’Instruction générale 58-201 relative à la gouvernance et qui s’adressent aux émetteurs assujettis canadiens, formulent certaines recommandations précises : « Le président du conseil devrait être un administrateur indépendant. Lorsque cela n’est pas approprié, un administrateur indépendant devrait être nommé pour agir comme “administrateur principal”.

Toutefois, un président du conseil indépendant ou un administrateur principal indépendant devrait jouer le rôle de véritable chef du conseil et veiller à ce que le programme de travail du conseil lui permette de s’acquitter correctement de ses fonctions.

Le conseil d’administration devrait élaborer des descriptions de poste claires pour le président du conseil et le président de chaque comité du conseil… »

La jurisprudence n’a presque pas abordé directement la question des obligations et des responsabilités particulières du président du conseil. Une décision australienne a cependant, établi que du fait de son rôle central de coordination des activités du conseil, la prestation du président du conseil devait être évaluée à la lumière des attentes et des pouvoirs liés à cette fonction.

« La Commission désire démontrer qu’il est monnaie courante dans les sociétés cotées que les responsabilités du président du conseil soient plus étendues que celles des autres administrateurs afin que celui-ci puisse veiller à ce que le conseil s’acquitte de ses tâches de surveillance. ».

Cette décision australienne va dans le sens des décisions canadiennes et américaines qui ont analysé la responsabilité de chacun des administrateurs à la lumière soit du poste occupé (p. ex., président ou membre d’un comité de vérification) soit des connaissances ou des compétences professionnelles particulières d’un administrateur (p. ex., l’avocat administrateur par rapport à une question juridique ou le spécialiste en financement par rapport à une évaluation financière ou aux conditions d’ententes de financement).

« Toutefois, à notre avis, les membres des comités de vérification devraient endosser une plus grande responsabilité que les autres administrateurs pour ce qui s’est produit lors de l’assemblée du conseil du 24 juillet 1990, non pas parce que le degré de diligence leur étant imposé était plus important, mais plutôt parce que leur situation était différente.

En tant que membres des comités de vérification, ils avaient plus de chances d’obtenir de l’information relative aux affaires de la société et d’examiner ces dernières que les non-membres. Par conséquent, on s’attendait à plus de leur part relativement à la surveillance du processus de communication de l’information financière et à la manière de signaler les problèmes aux autres administrateurs. »

La faute ou le respect ou non-respect des obligations d’un administrateur est évalué en fonction de son mandat, des attentes exprimées et des obligations qui lui sont imposées par la loi (diligence et loyauté). En l’absence de dispositions spécifiques de la loi, les tribunaux comparent le soin, la diligence et la compétence utilisés par l’administrateur à ceux de la personne prudente en pareilles circonstances ou, en d’autres termes, aux pratiques reconnues. L’article 122 (1) b) de la Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions fait d’ailleurs référence de manière explicite à cette comparaison :

Devoir des administrateurs et dirigeants

Les administrateurs et les dirigeants doivent, dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions, agir :

    1. avec intégrité et de bonne foi au mieux des intérêts de la société ;
    2. avec le soin, la diligence et la compétence dont ferait preuve en pareilles circonstances une personne prudente.
      Par conséquent, la responsabilité potentielle du président du conseil est analysée à la lumière des obligations imposées à tout un chacun des administrateurs, mais en prenant en compte, dans son cas et entre autres, les responsabilités et les pouvoirs spécifiques qui lui ont été confiés, et de la façon dont un président du conseil prudent devait ou aurait dû se comporter dans les circonstances. Donc, peu de pistes jurisprudentielles directes, mais certains indices d’évaluation de la responsabilité particulière d’un président du conseil.


Portrait suggéré par les meilleures pratiques

Sauf dans certaines circonstances exceptionnelles, la fonction de président du conseil comporte deux (2) volets principaux dans le cas de la majorité des sociétés où il y a non-cumul des fonctions de président du conseil et de chef de la direction :

    • la coordination et l’animation du conseil, et
    • l’interface entre le conseil et la direction.

Coordination et animation

Bien que le conseil doive assumer, en vertu de la plupart des lois constitutives, la responsabilité de la gestion de la société, la gestion quotidienne est, quant à elle, habituellement déléguée aux dirigeants, le conseil conservant la surveillance de cette gestion (« nose in fingers out ») et certains sujets prioritaires.

Le rôle principal du président du conseil est d’exercer ses talents et ses compétences, de consacrer le temps, les efforts et l’énergie raisonnables pour favoriser un fonctionnement et un rendement optimaux du conseil et de veiller au bon fonctionnement du conseil et à l’exécution de son mandat.

Voici les rubriques communes qu’un mandat du conseil devrait comprendre dans le cas de presque tous les types de sociétés :

    • promotion d’une culture éthique et d’intégrité au sein de la société et dans ses relations et transactions ;
    • surveillance de la gestion ;
    • orientations et plan stratégique ;
    • définition des rôles et des attentes (conseil, direction, président) ;
    • planification de la relève (direction et conseil) ;
    • budget et états financiers ;
    • contrôles et politiques (p. ex., code d’éthique) ;
    • gouvernance et mises en candidature ;
    • gestion des risques ;
    • évaluation et rémunération (dirigeants et conseil) ;
    • divulgation et qualité de l’information.

Il est évident que la responsabilité de surveillance de la gestion implique des rapports, des questions et des vérifications. Les administrateurs ne doivent pas être que des approbateurs aveugles ou complaisants des propositions et des actions de la direction ; ils doivent surveiller, questionner et vérifier.

Cependant, il faut rappeler qu’ils doivent clairement consacrer une part importante de leur énergie à apporter une valeur ajoutée à la société et à aider la direction à élaborer et réaliser le plan stratégique de la société.

En d’autres termes, et pour reprendre un thème cher à Yvan Allaire, auquel ce bulletin référait précédemment, ils ne devraient pas limiter leur rôle à l’aspect « fiduciaire », mais devraient être des contributeurs importants à la création de valeur.

Dans la coordination de l’exécution du mandat du conseil, le président du conseil est donc appelé à favoriser la répartition et la contribution des talents et des compétences des administrateurs en fonction de cette dynamique créatrice de valeur. C’est donc sous l’éclairage de ce commentaire que doivent être compris les différents volets de la tâche du président du conseil qu’on retrouve dans les lignes
qui suivent.

Pour favoriser l’exécution de ce mandat du conseil, le président du conseil devrait, avec « le soin, la diligence et la compétence dont ferait preuve en pareilles circonstances une personne prudente », entre autres :

  1. veiller à ce que les administrateurs :
    • reçoivent la formation et l’information pertinentes et nécessaires en temps utile ;
    • puissent obtenir réponse à leurs questions ;
    • puissent recevoir l’assistance matérielle (outils et documents) et celle d’experts ; et
    • puissent exprimer leurs points de vue et donc à ce qu’une part importante du temps alloué aux réunions soit réservée à l’expression de leurs questions et commentaires ;
  1. veiller à ce que chacun des éléments du mandat du conseil fasse l’objet d’actions, de décisions et de suivis lors des réunions du conseil, selon un calendrier et un programme de travail ; ainsi, il devrait préparer les réunions du conseil (y compris, de manière plus spécifique, élaborer l’ordre du jour, obtenir ou faire préparer les documents qui doivent être soumis et prévoir, choisir et organiser les présentations qui seront faites au conseil) et vérifier le suivi qui a été fait aux demandes et aux décisions antérieures du conseil ;
  2. diriger et animer les réunions formelles et informelles du conseil de manière à faire ressortir les points de vue de chacun et à favoriser l’élaboration de solutions et la prise de décisions (« consensus builder ») ;
  3. entre les réunions, s’informer des préoccupations des
    administrateurs à l’égard de la société et de ses activités, de la direction de la société, du fonctionnement du conseil et de la prestation des autres
    administrateurs ;
  4. aider les nouveaux administrateurs à faire un apprentissage rapide de leur charge ;
  5. coordonner l’évaluation du fonctionnement et de la prestation du conseil en collaboration avec le comité à qui le mandat de responsabilité de gouvernance a été confié et collaborer à l’évaluation que les autres administrateurs et la direction devraient faire de cette prestation ;
  6. veiller à ce que les plaintes, les commentaires et les suggestions des actionnaires ou des membres puissent être recueillis et communiqués au conseil, si ceux-ci sont d’importance, et à ce que toute atteinte aux droits des actionnaires ou membres portées à sa connaissance soit rapidement corrigée ou, à défaut, communiquée au conseil ;
  7. voir à ce que les assemblées des actionnaires ou membres soient dûment convoquées et à ce que les actionnaires ou membres puissent exercer leurs droits lors et à l’égard de ces assemblées et les présider à moins que cette présidence soit confiée à un professionnel ;
  8. veiller à ce que chaque comité du conseil respecte son mandat et son programme de travail et fasse dûment rapport au conseil ;
  9. surveiller le respect des politiques de la société applicables aux administrateurs par ceux-ci, à moins que ce mandat ne soit confié à un comité du conseil ;
  10. appuyer le chef de la direction en ce qui a trait à la représentation de la société auprès de la communauté ;
  11. selon des balises établies de concert avec la direction ou validées par le conseil, assumer une partie des communications officielles de la société dans certaines circonstances.

Rôle d’interface entre le conseil et la direction

Les motifs de bonne gouvernance qui militent en faveur du non-cumul des fonctions et d’une dynamique d’imputabilité de la direction envers le conseil ou, en d’autres termes, d’un juste équilibre de poids et contrepoids (« check and balance ») n’ont pas pour effet de diminuer l’importance du travail d’équipe entre la direction et le conseil dans la poursuite des objectifs de la société.

Le président du conseil est au centre de ces deux dynamiques auxquelles le conseil doit participer.

D’une part, c’est le président du conseil qui, comme on l’a vu, doit préparer et coordonner les travaux du conseil et veiller à ce que les décisions du conseil soient respectées par la direction. À ce titre, il devrait, par exemple :

    • communiquer à la direction les demandes, les attentes et les commentaires du conseil ;
    • obtenir pour le conseil les rapports désirés (rapports réguliers sur matières précises et sur le suivi de l’implantation des décisions) ;
    • s’informer auprès de la direction de tout élément important qui devrait être porté à la connaissance du conseil ou de l’un de ses comités ;
    • avec le comité de gestion et de rémunération des cadres supérieurs, suivre l’évolution de la carrière des principaux dirigeants, du plan de relève, des prestations des autres dirigeants et de la dynamique prévalant au sein de l’équipe de direction, de même qu’évaluer le chef de la direction pour que des rapports et des recommandations éclairés puissent être transmis au conseil ;
    • faire le point avec le chef de la direction sur une base régulière, entre les réunions, sur les perspectives de la société, les préoccupations, les défis et problèmes plus immédiats et les projets importants (financement, acquisition…) de la direction ;
    • veiller à ce que la direction soumette au conseil d’administration toute question qui est du ressort du conseil.

D’autre part, en plus de son rôle et de ses responsabilités officielles, le président du conseil est appelé, en pratique et dans la plupart des cas, à être le conseiller et souvent le confident du chef de la direction et parfois celui d’autres membres de la direction. Ainsi, le chef de la direction peut vouloir par exemple lui exprimer à l’occasion ses frustrations ou préoccupations personnelles ou encore lui demander son avis sur un projet donné ou un problème particulier.

Dans le contexte du travail d’équipe, ce rôle de sage et de conseiller est non seulement normal et sain, mais essentiel. Par ailleurs, en le jouant, le président du conseil doit être prudent et ne pas mettre en échec ou s’écarter de son rôle et de ses responsabilités officielles. De manière plus particulière, il ne doit pas affaiblir ses responsabilités et son rôle d’évaluation du chef de la direction.

Circonstances exceptionnelles d’implication plus directe

Certaines situations peuvent et, dans nombre de cas, devraient provoquer une implication plus directe du conseil et, par voie de conséquence, du président du conseil. Mentionnons, de manière non exhaustive, certaines circonstances :

    • la survenance d’événements susceptibles d’influer négativement et de manière importante sur la profitabilité de la société, l’avoir des actionnaires, la capacité de la société de poursuivre ses objectifs et sa mission ou encore sa réputation ; les situations d’insolvabilité de la société ;
    • les projets majeurs d’acquisition ;
    • les décisions susceptibles d’influer sur les droits des actionnaires ou des membres à ce titre ;
    • toute initiative d’un tiers visant à acquérir une partie significative des titres de la société ou de ses éléments d’actif (OPA ou autre type) ;
    • de façon plus générale, toute situation où les intérêts personnels de la direction sont susceptibles d’être en conflit avec ceux de la société ou de
      l’ensemble de ses actionnaires ou de ses membres ;
    • toute modification importante du plan stratégique ou du plan d’affaires de la société ;
    • toute dénonciation, allégation ou manifestation apparente d’une violation importante d’une règle de droit en matière de valeurs mobilières ou d’une règle de droit ayant pour objet la protection des actionnaires ou des membres de la société ;
    • toute dénonciation, allégation ou manifestation apparente d’une violation par la société de toute autre règle de droit susceptible d’entraîner des conséquences sérieuses pour la société ;
    • l’incapacité d’agir du chef de la direction pour quelque raison que ce soit, ou sa démission ou son congédiement.

Dans de telles circonstances, le président du conseil devrait clairement veiller à ce que le conseil soit rapidement et complètement informé et à ce qu’il contrôle et encadre l’élaboration de solutions ou de mesures correctrices, prenne les décisions qu’il juge appropriées et surveille le processus d’implantation de ces décisions.

Dans un tel contexte, le conseil devrait, dans plusieurs de ces cas, donner un mandat spécifique au président du conseil, à un autre administrateur ou à un comité pour que celui-ci joue un rôle plus important et plus direct que celui assumé en temps normal, de manière à ce que le conseil, par son intermédiaire, exerce un véritable contrôle du respect de ses décisions et du processus de gestion des circonstances exceptionnelles en question.

Écueils à éviter

Les raisons qui sont à l’origine de la séparation des fonctions et des pouvoirs du président du conseil et du chef de la direction et d’une répartition claire des mandats entre la direction et le conseil (« nose in fingers out ») nous permettent également de relever certains écueils qu’un président du conseil devrait éviter. Ainsi, le président du conseil devrait
idéalement éviter :

    • de se mêler de la gestion quotidienne ;
    • d’intervenir auprès des membres de la direction qui relèvent du chef de la direction ou des autres employés sauf pour poser des questions et ainsi éviter d’affecter négativement la crédibilité et l’autorité des dirigeants ;
    • de donner quelque directive que ce soit au chef de la direction qui ne serait pas l’expression des décisions du conseil et du ressort de celui-ci ;
    • sauf dans les circonstances exceptionnelles décrites précédemment, de ne pas maintenir la distance critique qui doit être maintenue entre la direction et le conseil et ainsi diminuer ou éliminer l’imputabilité de la direction ;
    • de devenir dans la pratique et au quotidien l’équivalent d’un supérieur immédiat du chef de la direction ;
    • d’accepter des faveurs personnelles importantes qui soient susceptibles d’influer sur l’exercice de son jugement indépendant à l’égard de la direction en général et du chef de la direction en particulier ; et
    • dans le cas où le président du conseil diverge de point de vue avec la majorité des administrateurs, d’amener le chef de la direction à ne pas implanter la décision du conseil de façon à aller dans le sens de la position minoritaire qu’il soutient.Plusieurs ont souligné que la présence physique quotidienne régulière du président du conseil dans les bureaux de la société accroît les risques qu’il se mêle de choses qui ne le regardent pas ou qu’il ne maintienne pas la distance suffisante pour assurer l’équilibre de poids et contrepoids « check and balance ».

Assistance au président du conseil

La société doit fournir au président du conseil les outils et les ressources matérielles et humaines adéquats pour accomplir son travail. Si tel n’est pas le cas, il sera difficile pour le président du conseil d’exécuter son mandat de manière efficace.

Ainsi, le président du conseil devrait avoir accès aux ressources du secrétariat de la société. Le mandat du secrétaire corporatif devrait prévoir que celui-ci doit respecter les instructions du président du conseil à l’égard des réunions du conseil. De plus, le secrétaire corporatif devrait respecter les exigences de confidentialité que peuvent lui imposer à l’occasion le président du conseil, les présidents de comités du conseil, le conseil ou les comités eux-mêmes, et ce, même à l’égard de la direction. Enfin, la direction devrait recueillir et prendre en compte les commentaires du président du conseil et du conseil sur l’évaluation de la prestation du secrétaire corporatif.

Compétences, qualités et habiletés d’un président du conseil

Les propos suivants se risquent à suggérer un profil idéal de certaines compétences, qualités et habiletés que devrait posséder un bon président de conseil d’administration.

Commençons par la négative : le président du conseil ne devrait pas être un gestionnaire frustré ou une personne assoiffée de pouvoir.

Outre les qualités évidentes d’intelligence et de leadership et les talents requis pour dégager ou bâtir des consensus, une personne appelée à assumer le poste de président du conseil devrait, entre autres et de manière plus particulière :

    • être capable d’exercer un jugement indépendant par rapport à la direction et à ses intérêts personnels ;
    • avoir la capacité de comprendre les enjeux, les défis, les réalités et les problèmes d’une direction d’entreprise ;
    • être un bon juge de personnes ; avoir une grande capacité d’écoute, de compréhension et de respect des autres ;
    • avoir une capacité de synthèse, un bon sens des priorités et un bon jugement ;
    • être capable de faire ressortir les talents et les points de vue de chacun ;
    • avoir une capacité de communication de haut niveau ;
    • avoir un profil d’intégrité sans taches ;
    • être capable de faire preuve d’une humilité suffisante pour laisser les feux des projecteurs se porter sur le chef de la direction plutôt que sur lui ;
    • avoir une connaissance adéquate du secteur d’activités dans lequel la société œuvre ou avoir la capacité d’acquérir rapidement cette connaissance ;
    • avoir la capacité ou le courage de prendre des décisions difficiles ; et
    • avoir un parcours et une expérience où ces compétences, ces qualités, ces talents et ces habiletés ont pu être éprouvés avec succès.

Aux États-Unis, certains ont d’ailleurs invoqué l’impossibilité de trouver des personnes offrant un tel profil pour justifier le maintien du cumul des fonctions.

Les votes et l’expression de dissidences ne devraient pas constituer des pratiques régulières au sein du conseil, car elles ne traduisent pas un fonctionnement harmonieux et collégial et à l’enseigne de la recherche du consensus. Un véritable bâtisseur de consensus est habituellement capable d’en réduire la fréquence de façon significative.

Présidents de comités

Plusieurs des commentaires formulés à l’égard du président du conseil s’appliquent dans une bonne mesure aux présidents de comités du conseil, aux présidents de comités de retraite ou d’autre type de comités, en faisant certaines adaptations.

Conclusion

Chaque société et chaque époque de l’évolution d’une société ont leurs caractéristiques et leurs exigences. Le contexte, l’identité des actionnaires ou des membres de la société, selon le cas, la composition du conseil et la personnalité du président du conseil et celle de chef de la direction font partie des nombreux facteurs qui vont influer sur le rôle du président du conseil et sur les qualités spécifiques que le président du conseil d’une société donnée devrait posséder.

Toutefois, les caractéristiques et exigences fondamentales devraient demeurer les mêmes et ce, peu importe les circonstances. Ce bulletin a tenté d’en décrire certaines.

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « collège des administrateurs de sociétés »

 

Dans des billets ultérieurs, je reviendrai sur plusieurs autres problématiques de gouvernance qui font l’objet de préoccupations par les conseils d’administration :

    1. La clarification des rôles et responsabilités des principaux acteurs de la gouvernance : (1) conseil d’administration (2) présidence du conseil d’administration (3) direction générale (4) comités du conseil (5) secrétaire du conseil d’administration.
    2. La composition et les rôles des comités du conseil soutenant la gouvernance : (1) comité de gouvernance et d’éthique (2) comité des ressources humaines et (3) comité d’audit.
    3. La révision de la composition du conseil d’administration : nombre d’administrateurs, profils de compétences, types de représentation, durée et nombre de mandats, indépendance des administrateurs, etc.
    4. La réévaluation du rôle du comité exécutif afin de mieux l’arrimer aux activités des autres comités.
    5. L’importance du rôle du secrétaire du conseil eu égard à son travail, avant, pendant et après les réunions du conseil.
    6. L’évaluation du processus de gestion des réunions du CA qui met l’accent sur l’amélioration de la dynamique d’équipe et la justification d’un huis clos productif et efficace.
    7. La raison d’être d’un processus d’évaluation annuelle de l’efficacité du conseil et la proposition d’instruments d’auto-évaluation des administrateurs.
    8. Les caractéristiques d’une bonne reddition de compte de la part de la direction générale.
    9. L’intégration des nouveaux administrateurs afin de les rendre opérationnels rapidement.
    10. L’adoption d’un code d’éthique des administrateurs exemplaire.

Au cours des prochaines semaines, j’aborderai les autres problématiques vécues lors de mes interventions-conseils.

Bonne lecture. Vos commentaires sont les bienvenus.

Spencer Stuart Board Index | 2019.


Julie Hembrock Daum , Laurel McCarthy et Ann Yerger, associés de la firme  Spencer Stuart présentent les grandes lignes du rapport annuel Spencer Stuart Board Index | 2019.

Comme vous le noterez, les changements observés sont cohérents avec les changements de fonds en gouvernance.

Cependant, puisque les CA ont tendance à être de plus petites tailles et que la rotation des administrateurs sur les conseils est plutôt faible, les changements se font à un rythme trop lent pour observer une modernisation significative

The 2019 U.S. Spencer Stuart Board Index finds that boards are heeding the growing calls from shareholders and other stakeholders and adding new directors with diversity of gender, age, race/ethnicity and professional backgrounds. However, because boardroom turnover remains low, with the new directors representing only 8% of all S&P 500 directors, changes to overall numbers continue at a slow pace.

Voici les points saillants de l’étude.

Bonne lecture !

2019 U.S. Spencer Stuart Board Index

 

A summary of the most notable findings in the 2019 U.S. Spencer Stuart Board Index.

Key Takeaways—2019 Spencer Stuart Board Index

Diversity is a priority

Of the 432 independent directors added to S&P 500 boards over the past year, a record-breaking 59% are diverse (defined as women and minority men), up from half last year. Women comprise 46% of the incoming class. Minority women (defined as African-American/Black, Asian and Hispanic/Latino) comprise 10% of new S&P 500 directors, and minority men 13%.

The professional experiences of S&P 500 directors are changing

Two thirds (65%) of the 2019 incoming class come from outside the ranks of CEO, chair/vice chair, president and COO. Financial talent is a focus area; 27% of the new directors have financial backgrounds. Other corporate leadership skills are valued, with 23% bringing experiences as division/subsidiary heads or as EVPs, SVPs or functional unit leaders.

Diverse directors are driving the changing profile of new S&P 500 directors

Only 19% of the diverse directors are current or former CEOs, compared to 44% of non-diverse men. Meanwhile 34% of the diverse directors are first-time corporate directors, nearly double the 18% of the non-diverse directors. Diverse directors bring other types of corporate leadership experience to the boardroom, with 31% of the diverse directors offering experiences as current or former line or functional leaders, compared to just 11% of the non-diverse men.

Sitting CEOs are increasingly not sitting on outside boards

This year’s survey found that on average, independent directors of S&P 500 companies serve on 2.1 boards, unchanged over the past five years. Meanwhile 59% of S&P 500 CEOs serve on no outside boards, up from 55% last year. Only 23 S&P 500 CEOs (5%) serve on two or more outside boards, and 79 independent directors (2%) serve on more than four public company boards.

Boards are adding younger directors, but the average age of S&P 500 directors is unchanged

Once again, one out of six directors added to S&P 500 boards are 50 or younger. Over half (59%) bring experiences from the private equity/investment management, consumer and information technology sectors. These younger directors are more diverse than the rest of the incoming class, with 69% either women (57% of “next gen” group) or minority men (12% of “next gen” group). They are also more likely to be serving on their first corporate board; 54% are first-time directors.

However, an overwhelming number of new directors are older. More than 40% of the incoming class is 60 or older; the average age of a new S&P 500 independent director is 57.5 years. Of the universe of S&P 500 independent directors, 20% are 70 or older, while only 6% are 50 or younger. The average age of an S&P 500 independent director is 63, largely unchanged since 2009.

Low turnover in the boardroom persists

Consistent with past years, 56% of S&P 500 boards added at least one independent director over the past year. More than one quarter (29%) made no changes to their roster of independent directors—neither adding nor losing independent directors—and 15% reduced the number of independent directors without adding any new independent directors.

The end result: in spite of the record number of female directors, representation of women on S&P 500 boards increased incrementally to 26% of all directors, up from 24% in 2018 and 16% in 2009. Today, 19% of all directors of the top 200 companies are male or female minorities, up from 17% last year and 15% in 2009.

Individual director assessments are gaining traction, but mandatory retirement policies continue to proliferate

This year 44% of S&P 500 companies disclosed some form of individual director assessment (up from 38% last year and 22% 10 years ago). However, 71% of S&P 500 boards (largely unchanged over the past five years) disclosed a mandatory retirement age for directors, and retirement ages continue to rise, with 46% of boards with caps setting the age at 75 or older, compared to just 15% in 2009.

Age caps influenced the majority of director departures from boards with retirement policies, with 41% either exceeding or reaching the age cap and another 14% leaving within three years of the retirement age.

Demographically, only 15% of the independent directors on boards with age caps are within three years of mandatory retirement. As a result, most S&P 500 directors have a long runway before reaching mandatory retirement.

Independent board chairs continue to grow in numbers and pay

Today more than half of S&P 500 boards (53%) split the chair and CEO roles, up from 37% a decade ago. One-third (34%) are chaired by an independent director, up from 31% last year and 16% in 2009.

Although the roles and responsibilities of an independent board chair and a lead director are frequently similar, the difference in compensation is wide and growing. Independent chairs receive, on average, an additional $172,000 in annual compensation, compared to an annual average supplement of $41,000 for independent lead directors.

For the first time, total director pay at S&P 500 boards averages more than $300,000

The average total compensation for S&P 500 non-employee directors, excluding independent chairs, is around $303,000, a 2% year-over-year increase. Director pay varies widely by sector, with a $100,000 difference between the average total pay of the highest and lowest paying sectors.

Key Takeaways—Survey of S&P 500 Nominating and Governance Committee Members

Our survey of more than 110 nominating and governance committee members of S&P 500 companies portends a continuation of trends identified in 2019 U.S. Spencer Stuart Board Index.

Turnover in the boardroom will remain low

On average, the surveyed nominating and governance committee members anticipate appointing/replacing one director each year over the next three years.

Boards will increase their focus on racial/ethnic diversity and continue to focus on gender diversity

Diversity considerations are two of the top five issues for the next three years. While 75% of the surveyed committee members reported that gender diversity was addressed in the past year, 66% said it would continue to be a priority over the next three years. Only 38% reported that racial/ethnic diversity was addressed in the past year, but 65% said it was a top priority for the next three years.

Industry experience will be a key recruiting consideration

The top priority for the next three years—cited by 82% of the surveyed committee members—is expanding director sector/industry experience.

Evaluations of boards and directors will be examined

Enhancing board and individual director evaluations is another top priority for the next three years, identified by 61% of the respondents. While more than three quarters of respondents ranked their full board and committee assessments as very or extremely effective, only 62% gave similar marks to peer evaluations and a just over a majority (53%) gave similar rankings to self-assessments.

Boards will have to cast a wide net to identify director talent

The top five recruiting priorities for the next three years are: female directors (40%); technology experience (38%); active CEO/COO (35%); digital/social media experience (29%); and minorities (27%). Finding a single director who meets all of these criteria is difficult at best, and given supply/demand pressures, boards will have to dig deeper to identify qualified director candidates.

Together the 2019 U.S. Spencer Stuart Board Index and Spencer Stuart’s Survey of S&P 500 Nominating and Governance Committee Members indicate that the profile of S&P 500 directors will continue to change and board composition will continue to evolve. But the pace of change will remain measured.