Étude sur les comportements « limites » des PDG (CEO)


Quelles actions les conseils d’administration sont-ils susceptibles d’adopter dans les cas où leur PDG (CEO) a un comportement « limite » tout en n’étant pas illégal ?

L’article récemment publié par David Larcker* et Brian Tayan** dans la Harvard Business Review présente plusieurs exemples de situations où les CEO captent l’attention du public pour de mauvaises raisons !

Les CA sont les garants de la réputation de l’entreprise et, lorsque confrontés à des comportements fautifs de la part de leur CEO, ils doivent s’assurer de prendre toutes les mesures appropriées.

Les auteurs ont identifié 38 cas de comportements de CEO déviants qui ont un des échos révélateurs et qui ont généré des actions de gestion de crises. L’échantillon des cas retenus a été présenté en cinq grandes catégories :

(1) 34 % des cas impliquent des CEO qui ont menti à propos de leurs affaires personnelles ;

(2) 21 % des cas sont de nature sexuelle, impliquant un subordonné, un entrepreneur ou un consultant ;

(3) 16 % des cas concernent l’utilisation « questionnable » des fonds de l’entreprise ;

(4) 16 % des cas consistent en comportements grossiers ou abusifs ;

(5) 13 % des cas consistent en déclarations publiques qui ont des conséquences négatives sur les clients ou sur un groupe social en particulier.

Les résultats suivants ressortent clairement de l’étude :

– The impact of misbehavior on corporate reputation is significant and long-lasting.

– Shareholders generally (but do not always) react negatively to news of misconduct.

– Most companies take an active approach in responding to allegations of misconduct.

– Corporate punishment for CEO misbehavior is inconsistent.

– CEO misbehavior can reverberate across the organization.

For boards of directors, the lessons are clear: For better or worse, the CEO is often the face of the corporation. When the CEO engages in misconduct, the board has an obligation to investigate the matter, take proactive steps to ensure that it is properly dealt with, and — most important — ensure that corporate reputation, culture, and long-term performance are not damaged.

Je vous invite à lire plus à fond les répercussions de ces mauvais comportements sur la réputation de l’organisation ainsi que les décisions prises par les CA dans chaque situation.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont les bienvenus.

Incidents of CEO Bad Behavior

 

3032212-poster-p-4-aa-dov-charney

 

Most boards of directors know what to do when their CEO is accused of illegal activity. They conduct an independent investigation, and if the allegations are verified, they take corrective action. In most cases, the CEO is terminated.

It is much less obvious what actions the board should take when the CEO is accused of behavior that is questionable but not illegal. For example, if the CEO makes controversial public statements, has personal relations with an employee or contractor, or develops a reputation for being rude, overbearing, or verbally combative, the board must decide what merits investigation. It must also decide whether to address matters publicly or privately. These decisions become even more important when CEO misbehavior is picked up by the media, bringing unwanted public attention that can have an impact on the organization and its reputation.

To examine how corporations handle allegations of CEO misbehavior, we conducted an extensive review of news media between 2000 and 2015. We identified 38 incidents where a CEO’s behavior garnered a meaningful level of media coverage (defined as more than 10 unique news references). We categorized these incidents as follows:

34% involved reports of a CEO lying to the board or shareholders over personal matters, such as a drunk driving offense, undisclosed criminal record, falsification of credentials, or other behavior.

21% involved a sexual affair or relations with a subordinate, contractor, or consultant.

16% involved CEOs making use of corporate funds in a manner that is questionable but not strictly illegal.

16% involved CEOs engaging in objectionable personal behavior or using abusive language.

13% involved CEOs making public statements that are offensive to customers or social groups.

Examining these incidents in detail, five main findings stood out:

The impact of misbehavior on corporate reputation is significant and long-lasting. The incidents that we identified were cited in over 250 news stories each, on average. Furthermore, media coverage was persistent, with references made to the CEO’s actions up to an average of 4.9 years after initial occurrence. For example, news stories today continue to reference former American Apparel CEO Dov Charney’s odd behavior of walking around the company’s offices in his underwear, even though it was first reported over 10 years ago. Boards should not expect allegations of misbehavior to disappear quickly.

Shareholders generally (but do not always) react negatively to news of misconduct. Among the companies in our sample, share prices declined by a market-adjusted 3.1% (1.1% median) over the three-day trading period around the initial news story. For example, Hewlett-Packard stock fell almost 9% following reports that former CEO Mark Hurd had a personal relationship with a female contractor. However, shareholder reactions are not uniformly negative. Of the 38 companies in our sample. 11 exhibited positive stock price returns when CEO misbehavior made the news. Perhaps unexpectedly, there is no discernible relationship between the type of behavior and stock price reaction.

Most companies take an active approach in responding to allegations of misconduct. In 84% of cases, the company issued a press release or formal statement on the matter. In 71% of cases, a spokesperson provided direct commentary to the press. Board members were much less likely to speak to the media, making direct comments only 37% of the time. In over half of cases (55%), the board of directors was known to initiate an independent review or investigation. The board is most likely to announce an independent review in cases of potential financial misconduct. However, the willingness of an individual director to discuss the matter directly with the press does not appear to be associated with the type of behavior involved or the “severity” of the CEO’s actions.

Corporate punishment for CEO misbehavior is inconsistent. In 58% of incidents, the CEO was eventually terminated for his or her actions. Questionable financial practices was the only category of behavior that almost uniformly resulted in termination; all other behaviors resulted in both outcomes (termination and retention) across our sample. Even behavior as straightforward as falsifying information on a resume was treated inconsistently by different boards. In a third of cases (32%), the board took actions other than termination in response to CEO misconduct, such as stripping the CEO of the chair title, removing the CEO from the board, amending the corporate code of conduct, reducing or eliminating the CEO’s bonus, other director resignation, and other changes to board structure or composition.

CEO misbehavior can reverberate across the organization. Approximately one-third of companies faced additional fallout from the CEO’s actions, including loss of a major client, federal investigation, shareholder or federal lawsuit, or shareholder action such as a proxy battle. Forty-five percent of companies in the sample experienced a significant unrelated governance issue following the event, such as an accounting restatement, unrelated lawsuit, shareholder action, or bankruptcy. As for the CEOs themselves, three were reported to resign from other boards because of their actions. Two CEOs who were terminated were subsequently rehired by the same company. We found that many continued in their position or were hired by other corporations or investment groups; otherwise there was no notable news of what happened to them professionally.

For boards of directors, the lessons are clear: For better or worse, the CEO is often the face of the corporation. When the CEO engages in misconduct, the board has an obligation to investigate the matter, take proactive steps to ensure that it is properly dealt with, and — most important — ensure that corporate reputation, culture, and long-term performance are not damaged.


David Larcker* is the James Irvin Miller Professor of Accounting and Senior Faculty at the Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University. He is a co-author of the books Corporate Governance Matters and A Real Look at Real World Corporate Governance.

Brian Tayan** is a researcher at the Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University. He is a co-author of the books Corporate Governance Matters and A Real Look at Real World Corporate Governance.

Douze raisons pour faire de la RSE un levier de croissance


Voici une infographie réalisée par Pixelis, directement inspirée de la publication « le cercle – LES ECHOS« . Comme vous le savez, les infographies sont d’excellents moyens pour mieux communiquer et mieux faire passer les messages.

Dans ce cas-ci, il s’agit d’illustrer douze raisons qui devraient inciter les entreprises à mettre en œuvre des actions qui favoriseront la responsabilité sociale.

Bon visionnement !

 Les 12 raisons de faire de la RSE un levier de croissance

 

IMG_20140516_140943

 

Devenez blogueur invité sur mon site en gouvernance des sociétés


Aimeriez-vous agir à titre d’auteur invité (« Invited guess ») sur mon blogue en gouvernance des sociétés ? Avez-vous un article déjà écrit ou souhaitez-vous m’aider en contribuant à l’écriture d’un court billet en gouvernance de sociétés ?

Chaque jour, je publie un billet qui porte sur un sujet d’actualité récente en gouvernance; si vous êtes intéressés à ajouter de la valeur à ce blogue, vous êtes invités à me soumettre un article original portant sur un des multiples objets de la gouvernance des sociétés privées, publiques, OBNL, coopératives, PME, sociétés d’État, etc.

Que retrouve-t-on dans ce blogue et quels en sont les objectifs ?

Ce blogue fait l’inventaire des documents les plus pertinents et récents en gouvernance des entreprises. La sélection des billets, « posts », est le résultat d’une veille assidue des articles de revue, des blogues et sites web dans le domaine de la gouvernance, des publications scientifiques et professionnelles, des études et autres rapports portant sur la gouvernance des sociétés, au Canada et dans d’autres pays, notamment aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en France, en Europe, et en Australie. Chaque jour, je fais un choix parmi l’ensemble des publications récentes et pertinentes et je commente brièvement la publication.

L’objectif de ce blogue est d’être la référence en matière de documentation en gouvernance dans le monde francophone, en fournissant au lecteur une mine de renseignements récents (les billets quotidiens) ainsi qu’un outil de recherche simple et facile à utiliser pour répertorier les publications en fonction des catégories les plus pertinentes.

P1020968

 

Quelques statistiques à propos du blogue Gouvernance | Jacques Grisé

Ce blogue a été initié le 15 juillet 2011 et, à ce jour, il a accueilli plus de 120 000 visiteurs. Depuis le début, sur une base quotidienne, j’ai œuvré à la publication de 1 070 billets. Le blogue a progressé de manière tout à fait remarquable et, au 30 novembre 2014, il est fréquenté par plus de 5 000 visiteurs par mois.

L’année dernière, le blogue a connu une croissance de 82 %. Notons que celui-ci a obtenu la deuxième position à l’échelle canadienne parmi les blogues de la catégorie Business/marketing/médias sociaux, le seul des lauréats dans le domaine de la gouvernance.

En 2015, j’estime qu’environ 5 500 personnes par mois visiteront le blogue afin de s’informer sur diverses questions de gouvernance.

À ce rythme, on peut penser qu’environ 70 000 personnes visiteront le site du blogue en 2015. On  note que 42 % des billets sont partagés par l’intermédiaire de LinkedIn et 45 % par différents engins de recherche. Les autres réseaux sociaux (Twitter, Facebook et Tumblr) se partagent 13 % des références.

Voici un aperçu du nombre de visiteurs par pays :

  1. Canada (64 %)
  2. France, Suisse, Belgique (20 %)
  3. Magreb (Maroc, Tunisie, Algérie) (5 %)
  4. Autres pays de l’Union Européenne (2 %)
  5. États-Unis (2 %)
  6. Autres pays de provenance (7 %)

Quels sont les avantages à publier un billet sur ce blogue ?

  1. L’occasion de publier sur le blogue en gouvernance le plus fréquenté au Québec ainsi que sur l’un des plus réputés dans le monde francophone et au canada anglais;
  2. La possibilité d’ajouter votre Bio en incluant deux liens URL ainsi que des liens pertinents dans le texte publié;
  3. Le partage du billet sur plusieurs réseaux sociaux ainsi que sur une quinzaine de groupes de discussion professionnels de LinkedIn;
  4. La possibilité d’obtenir de la rétroaction et des commentaires de la part des lecteurs.

Directives simples

  1. Un texte d’environ 500 mots sur un sujet d’actualité en gouvernance;
  2. Les liens publicitaires ne sont pas autorisés;
  3. L’article doit être original et basé sur une opinion ou une recherche documentée.

Comment procéder ?

La procédure est très simple et rapide. J’ai besoin de vos coordonnées, du sujet du billet ainsi que d’une brève description de votre texte de 500 mots.

Je vous répondrai dans les heures qui suivent. Après entente sur la pertinence de la publication, je vous demanderai de me soumettre le texte complet dans les deux semaines qui suivent.

Si le texte soumis est susceptible d’apporter un éclairage inédit sur la gouvernance, je vous reviendrai avec un feedback ainsi qu’avec la programmation de la publication.

Vous pouvez aussi choisir une image qui illustre bien le propos du billet.

Cliquez ICI pour me rejoindre

Devenez blogueur invité sur mon site en gouvernance des sociétés


Aimeriez-vous agir à titre d’auteur invité (« Invited guess ») sur mon blogue en gouvernance des sociétés ? Avez-vous un article déjà écrit ou souhaitez-vous m’aider en contribuant à l’écriture d’un court billet en gouvernance de sociétés ?

Chaque jour, je publie un billet qui porte sur un sujet d’actualité récente en gouvernance; si vous êtes intéressés à ajouter de la valeur à ce blogue, vous êtes invités à me soumettre un article original portant sur un des multiples objets de la gouvernance des sociétés privées, publiques, OBNL, coopératives, PME, sociétés d’État, etc.

Que retrouve-t-on dans ce blogue et quels en sont les objectifs ?

 

Ce blogue fait l’inventaire des documents les plus pertinents et récents en gouvernance des entreprises. La sélection des billets, « posts », est le résultat d’une veille assidue des articles de revue, des blogues et sites web dans le domaine de la gouvernance, des publications scientifiques et professionnelles, des études et autres rapports portant sur la gouvernance des sociétés, au Canada et dans d’autres pays, notamment aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en France, en Europe, et en Australie. Chaque jour, je fais un choix parmi l’ensemble des publications récentes et pertinentes et je commente brièvement la publication.

L’objectif de ce blogue est d’être la référence en matière de documentation en gouvernance dans le monde francophone, en fournissant au lecteur une mine de renseignements récents (les billets quotidiens) ainsi qu’un outil de recherche simple et facile à utiliser pour répertorier les publications en fonction des catégories les plus pertinentes.

 

P1020968

 

Quelques statistiques à propos du blogue Gouvernance | Jacques Grisé

 

Ce blogue a été initié le 15 juillet 2011 et, à ce jour, il a accueilli plus de 115 000 visiteurs. Depuis le début, sur une base quotidienne, j’ai œuvré à la publication de 1 039 billets. Le blogue a progressé de manière tout à fait remarquable et, au 1er novembre 2014, il est fréquenté par plus de 4 500 visiteurs par mois.

L’année dernière, le blogue a connu une croissance de 82 %. Notons que celui-ci a obtenu la deuxième position à l’échelle canadienne parmi les blogues de la catégorie Business/marketing/médias sociaux, le seul des lauréats dans le domaine de la gouvernance.

En 2015, j’estime qu’environ 5 000 personnes par mois visiteront le blogue afin de s’informer sur diverses questions de gouvernance.

À ce rythme, on peut penser que plus de 60 000 personnes visiteront le site du blogue en 2015. On  note que 42 % des billets sont partagés par l’intermédiaire de LinkedIn et 45 % par différents engins de recherche. Les autres réseaux sociaux (Twitter, Facebook et Tumblr) se partagent 13 % des références.

Voici un aperçu du nombre de visiteurs par pays :

  1. Canada (64 %)
  2. France, Suisse, Belgique (20 %)
  3. Magreb (Maroc, Tunisie, Algérie) (5 %)
  4. Autres pays de l’Union Européenne (2 %)
  5. États-Unis (2 %)
  6. Autres pays de provenance (7 %)

Quels sont les avantages à publier un billet sur ce blogue ?

 

  1. L’occasion de publier sur le blogue en gouvernance le plus fréquenté au Québec ainsi que sur l’un des plus réputés dans le monde francophone et au canada anglais;
  2. La possibilité d’ajouter votre Bio en incluant deux liens URL ainsi que des liens pertinents dans le texte publié;
  3. Le partage du billet sur plusieurs réseaux sociaux ainsi que sur une quinzaine de groupes de discussion professionnels de LinkedIn;
  4. La possibilité d’obtenir de la rétroaction et des commentaires de la part des lecteurs.

Directives simples

 

  1. Un texte d’environ 500 mots sur un sujet d’actualité en gouvernance;
  2. Les liens publicitaires ne sont pas autorisés;
  3. L’article doit être original et basé sur une opinion ou une recherche documentée.

Comment procéder ?

 

La procédure est très simple et rapide. J’ai besoin de vos coordonnées, du sujet du billet ainsi que d’une brève description de votre texte de 500 mots.

Je vous répondrai dans les heures qui suivent. Après entente sur la pertinence de la publication, je vous demanderai de me soumettre le texte complet dans les deux semaines qui suivent.

Si le texte soumis est susceptible d’apporter un éclairage inédit sur la gouvernance, je vous reviendrai avec un feedback ainsi qu’avec la programmation de la publication.

Vous pouvez aussi choisir une image qui illustre bien le propos du billet.

 

Cliquez ICI pour me rejoindre

Magazine des actualités récentes en gouvernance | La gouvernance de sociétés


Vous trouverez, ci-joint, la première ébauche d’un magazine électronique qui répertorie les meilleures publications ainsi que les références incontournables en gouvernance des sociétés.

Le magazine électronique compte maintenant 471 flips de pages et présente 448 articles sur des thèmes importants en gouvernance.

Photo du magazine Gouvernance des sociétés

Les billets sont principalement issus du blogue Gouvernance | Jacques Grisé et ils sont présentés en ordre chronologique descendant, sur une période de trois ans. J’ai l’intention de mettre cette publication à jour trimestriellement.

Le lien suivant vous conduira à la publication du document sur le site de l’application Flipboard. Si cette formule de publication électronique vous intéresse, je vous suggère de télécharger l’application sur votre Ipad ou sur une autre tablette.

Magazine des actualités récentes en gouvernance  |  La gouvernance des sociétés

 

 

Un guide essentiel pour comprendre et enseigner la gouvernance | Version française *


Plusieurs administrateurs et formateurs me demandent de leur proposer un document de vulgarisation sur le sujet de la gouvernance. J’ai déjà diffusé sur mon blogue un guide à l’intention des journalistes spécialisés dans le domaine de la gouvernance des sociétés à travers le monde.

Il a été publié par le Global Corporate Governance Forum et International Finance Corporation (un organisme de la World Bank) en étroite coopération avec International Center for Journalists.

Je n’ai encore rien vu de plus complet et de plus pertinent sur la meilleure manière d’appréhender les multiples problématiques reliées à la gouvernance des entreprises mondiales. La direction de Global Corporate Governance Forum m’a fait parvenir le document en français le 14 février.

Qui dirige l’entreprise : Guide pratique de médiatisation du gouvernement d’entreprise – document en français

 

Ce guide est un outil pédagogique indispensable pour acquérir une solide compréhension des diverses facettes de la gouvernance des sociétés. Les auteurs ont multiplié les exemples de problèmes d’éthiques et de conflits d’intérêts liés à la conduite des entreprises mondiales. On apprend aux journalistes économiques – et à toutes les personnes préoccupées par la saine gouvernance – à raffiner les investigations et à diffuser les résultats des analyses effectuées.

Je vous recommande fortement de lire le document, mais aussi de le conserver en lieu sûr car il est fort probable que vous aurez l’occasion de vous en servir.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous quelques extraits de l’introduction à la version anglaise de l’ouvrage que j’avais publiée antérieurement.

Who’s Running the Company ? A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance

 

À propos du Guide

English: Paternoster Sauqre at night, 21st May...

« This Guide is designed for reporters and editors who already have some experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how a company is governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Topics include the media’s role as a watchdog, how the board of directors functions, what constitutes good practice, what financial reports reveal, what role shareholders play and how to track down and use information shedding light on a company’s inner workings. Journalists will learn how to recognize “red flags,” or warning  signs, that indicate whether a company may be violating laws and rules. Tips on reporting and writing guide reporters in developing clear, balanced, fair and convincing stories.

Three recurring features in the Guide help reporters apply “lessons learned” to their own “beats,” or coverage areas:

– Reporter’s Notebook: Advise from successful business journalists

– Story Toolbox:  How and where to find the story ideas

– What Do You Know? Applying the Guide’s lessons

Each chapter helps journalists acquire the knowledge and skills needed to recognize potential stories in the companies they cover, dig out the essential facts, interpret their findings and write clear, compelling stories:

  1. What corporate governance is, and how it can lead to stories. (Chapter 1, What’s good governance, and why should journalists care?)
  2. How understanding the role that the board and its committees play can lead to stories that competitors miss. (Chapter 2, The all-important board of directors)
  3. Shareholders are not only the ultimate stakeholders in public companies, but they often are an excellent source for story ideas. (Chapter 3, All about shareholders)
  4. Understanding how companies are structured helps journalists figure out how the board and management interact and why family-owned and state-owned enterprises (SOEs), may not always operate in the best interests of shareholders and the public. (Chapter 4, Inside family-owned and state-owned enterprises)
  5. Regulatory disclosures can be a rich source of exclusive stories for journalists who know where to look and how to interpret what they see. (Chapter 5, Toeing the line: regulations and disclosure)
  6. Reading financial statements and annual reports — especially the fine print — often leads to journalistic scoops. (Chapter 6, Finding the story behind the numbers)
  7. Developing sources is a key element for reporters covering companies. So is dealing with resistance and pressure from company executives and public relations directors. (Chapter 7, Writing and reporting tips)

 

Each chapter ends with a section on Sources, which lists background resources pertinent to that chapter’s topics. At the end of the Guide, a Selected Resources section provides useful websites and recommended reading on corporate governance. The Glossary defines terminology used in covering companies and corporate governance ».

______________________________________________

* En reprise

Enhanced by Zemanta

La gestion de crise par Sébastien Théberge | Vidéo du CAS


Pendant trois minutes, un expert du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS) partage une réflexion et se prononce sur un sujet d’actualité lié à la gouvernance.

Cette semaine Sébastien Théberge, directeur principal, Affaires publiques et communication, Ivanhoé Cambridge, explique qu’une crise est l’élément le plus grave auquel fera face une organisation. Ainsi, un plan de gestion de crise est essentiel pour les administrateurs.

Bon visionnement !

Collège des administrateurs de sociétés

La gestion de crise par Sébastien Théberge  |  Vidéo du CAS

La gestion de crise, par Sébastien Théberge

Gestion de crise : Sept conseils pour éviter les surprises


Nous avons demandé à Louis Aucoin*, associé principal chez OCTANE STRATEGIES | COMMUNICATIONS, d’agir à titre d’auteur invité. Son billet, publié sur le blogue de l’entreprise, expose sept conseils utiles aux gestionnaires et aux membres de C.A. pour éviter d’être confrontés à de mauvaises surprises dans une situation de crise. Voici donc l’article en question, reproduit ici avec la permission de l’auteur. Vos commentaires sont appréciés. Bonne lecture.

Gestion de crise : Sept conseils pour éviter les surprises

Par Louis Aucoin*

Une bonne partie de la gestion de crise consiste surtout à gérer l’effet de surprise… Réduisez cet effet de surprise au maximum afin de savoir si vous faites face – ou non – à une véritable crise. Voici sept conseils pour y parvenir.

1.  Ça n’arrive pas qu’aux autres

Pensez-y   bien… une erreur de livraison peut-elle être fatale ? Votre environnement de   travail est-il vraiment inoffensif ? De qui dépendez-vous le plus pour la conduite de vos affaires ? Ensuite, prenez toutes les idées « qui n’arriveront jamais » et reconsidérez-les encore. Juste pour voir.

2.  C’est qui le patron ici ?

On remet souvent la gestion de crise dans les mains du patron seulement. Oups ! Et qu’est-ce qu’on fait s’il est pas là ? Assurez-vous qu’en cas de crise, tous les membres de l’entreprise se tournent vers la bonne personne et que cette personne soit capable d’assumer le leadership requis.

3.  On commence par où ? Prévoyez les deux premières étapes

À moins d’utiliser des produits chimiques ou radioactifs, plusieurs petites entreprises n’ont surtout besoin que de prévoir les deux premières étapes :

  1. Mise en œuvre de la chaîne de commandement   (qui doit être informé en premier);
  2. Réaffectation des ressources   (l’organisation doit pouvoir continuer ses opérations).

Ainsi, l’entreprise est déjà en situation de prendre les décisions nécessaires à la fois pour fonctionner et pour gérer la crise.

Crises
Crises (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4.    Assurez-vous de la cohésion interne

Prendre le temps d’informer les membres de l’organisation peut vous être d’un immense secours. De même, l’équipe décisionnelle doit prendre ses décisions d’un commun accord, quitte à y consacrer de précieuses minutes. Pas de succès externe sans cohésion interne.     

5.  Parlez aux médias quand vous serez prêt

Bien des situations ne nécessitent pas que l’entreprise s’adresse aux médias. Mais lorsqu’il le faut, vous devez être prêt. Avant de retourner l’appel d’un journaliste, convenez des messages que vous souhaitez transmettre, puis choisissez la meilleure personne pour ce faire. Surtout pas d’improvisation ! Mieux vaut manquer le prochain bulletin de nouvelles que d’y figurer par sa propre faute !     

6.  Faites-vous durer la crise ? Une poursuite en justice… un communiqué de presse le lendemain… une lettre ouverte de vengeance… accepter une entrevue la semaine suivante… Voilà quelques-uns des moyens les plus   efficaces de faire durer les crises. Soyez vigilant et faites appel à des spécialistes en relations publiques pour vous soutenir dans la prise de décision. Ne perdez pas de vue votre objectif : mettre fin à la crise au plus vite.

7.  Chanceux ! Une « opportunité » ! Aussi curieux que cela puisse paraître, vous trouverez peut-être que votre crise renferme une opportunité. N’est-ce pas un bon moment de renouer avec vos anciens clients ? Avec un peu de créativité, vous pourriez même y gagner gros

______________________________

*À titre d’associé principal, Louis Aucoin, MPA, est spécialisé en relations publiques et en politiques publiques. Du fait de sa formation de maîtrise en administration publique et de son expérience professionnelle, il possède une expertise pointue des relations avec les médias et de la gestion stratégique des enjeux de l’administration publique. Avant de se joindre à Stratégies | Communications, Louis Aucoin a assumé la direction des communications d’un parti politique majeur, y occupant également les fonctions de conseiller aux affaires parlementaires et d’attaché de presse.

______________________________________________

*

Un guide essentiel pour comprendre et enseigner la gouvernance | Version française*


Plusieurs administrateurs et formateurs me demandent de leur proposer un document de vulgarisation sur le sujet de la gouvernance. J’ai déjà diffusé sur mon blogue un guide à l’intention des journalistes spécialisés dans le domaine de la gouvernance des sociétés à travers le monde. Il a été publié par le Global Corporate Governance Forum et International Finance Corporation (un organisme de la World Bank) en étroite coopération avec International Center for Journalists. Je n’ai encore rien vu de plus complet et de plus pertinent sur la meilleure manière d’appréhender les multiples problématiques reliées à la gouvernance des entreprises mondiales. La direction de Global Corporate Governance Forum m’a fait parvenir le document en français le 14 février.

Qui dirige l’entreprise : Guide pratique de médiatisation du gouvernement d’entreprise – document en français

Ce guide est un outil pédagogique indispensable pour acquérir une solide compréhension des diverses facettes de la gouvernance des sociétés. Les auteurs ont multiplié les exemples de problèmes d’éthiques et de conflits d’intérêts liés à la conduite des entreprises mondiales. On apprend aux journalistes économiques – et à toutes les personnes préoccupées par la saine gouvernance – à raffiner les investigations et à diffuser les résultats des analyses effectuées. Je vous recommande fortement de lire le document, mais aussi de le conserver en lieu sûr car il est fort probable que vous aurez l’occasion de vous en servir.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous quelques extraits de l’introduction à l’ouvrage.

Who’s Running the Company ? A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance

À propos du Guide

English: Paternoster Sauqre at night, 21st May...

« This Guide is designed for reporters and editors who already have some experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how a company is governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Topics include the media’s role as a watchdog, how the board of directors functions, what constitutes good practice, what financial reports reveal, what role shareholders play and how to track down and use information shedding light on a company’s inner workings. Journalists will learn how to recognize “red flags,” or warning  signs, that indicate whether a company may be violating laws and rules. Tips on reporting and writing guide reporters in developing clear, balanced, fair and convincing stories.

Three recurring features in the Guide help reporters apply “lessons learned” to their own “beats,” or coverage areas:

– Reporter’s Notebook: Advise from successful business journalists

– Story Toolbox:  How and where to find the story ideas

– What Do You Know? Applying the Guide’s lessons

Each chapter helps journalists acquire the knowledge and skills needed to recognize potential stories in the companies they cover, dig out the essential facts, interpret their findings and write clear, compelling stories:

  1. What corporate governance is, and how it can lead to stories. (Chapter 1, What’s good governance, and why should journalists care?)
  2. How understanding the role that the board and its committees play can lead to stories that competitors miss. (Chapter 2, The all-important board of directors)
  3. Shareholders are not only the ultimate stakeholders in public companies, but they often are an excellent source for story ideas. (Chapter 3, All about shareholders)
  4. Understanding how companies are structured helps journalists figure out how the board and management interact and why family-owned and state-owned enterprises (SOEs), may not always operate in the best interests of shareholders and the public. (Chapter 4, Inside family-owned and state-owned enterprises)
  5. Regulatory disclosures can be a rich source of exclusive stories for journalists who know where to look and how to interpret what they see. (Chapter 5, Toeing the line: regulations and disclosure)
  6. Reading financial statements and annual reports — especially the fine print — often leads to journalistic scoops. (Chapter 6, Finding the story behind the numbers)
  7. Developing sources is a key element for reporters covering companies. So is dealing with resistance and pressure from company executives and public relations directors. (Chapter 7, Writing and reporting tips)

Each chapter ends with a section on Sources, which lists background resources pertinent to that chapter’s topics. At the end of the Guide, a Selected Resources section provides useful websites and recommended reading on corporate governance. The Glossary defines terminology used in covering companies and corporate governance ».

Here’s what Ottawa’s new rules for state-owned buyers may look like (business.financialpost.com)

The Vote is Cast: The Effect of Corporate Governance on Shareholder Value (greenbackd.com)

Effective Drivers of Good Corporate Governance (shilpithapar.com)

______________________________________________

*Je suis en congé jusqu’à la fin septembre. Durant cette période, j’ai décidé de rééditer les billets considérés comme étant les plus pertinents par les lecteurs de mon blogue (depuis le début des activités le 19 juillet 2011).

La crise la mieux gérée est celle que l’on évite !


Cette semaine, nous avons récidivé en demandant à Richard Thibault*, président de RTCOMM, d’agir à titre d’auteur invité.  Richard montre que la réputation d’une organisation est son actif intangible le plus important et le facteur clé de sa réussite. En puisant dans son expérience de consultant en gestion de crise, son billet présente des exemples de signes avant-coureurs de l’émergence d’une situation de crise.

L’article identifie certaines erreurs que les organisations commettent lors de ces situations difficiles. En tant que membres de conseils d’administration, vous aurez sûrement l’occasion de vivre des crises significatives; il est important d’en connaître les signes ainsi que les comportements que la direction devrait éviter en pareilles circonstances.

Voici donc l’article en question, reproduit ici avec la permission de l’auteur. Vos commentaires sont appréciés. Bonne lecture.

La crise la mieux gérée est celle que l’on évite !

Par Richard Thibault*

Membres d’un CA, vous savez très bien que lorsque les gens pensent à une organisation et la choisissent, c’est la plupart du temps la réputation de cette dernière qui fait pencher la balance en sa faveur. La réputation d’une organisation ou son image de marque compte parmi ses atouts les plus importants. C’est probablement l’intangible le plus profitable de tout son patrimoine. Une image positive épaulera l’équipe chargée des relations avec les actionnaires, des ventes ou du marketing puisqu’une image de qualité reflète la valeur de l’entreprise. Une bonne image de marque appuiera l’équipe des ressources humaines dans ses efforts pour attirer et retenir les meilleurs collaborateurs. Elle moussera le sentiment de fierté et d’appartenance, autant chez les clients que chez les employés ou les partenaires.

Maple Leaves
Maple Leaves (Photo credit: Kansas Explorer 3128)

Une bonne image de marque facilitera les relations avec les médias et teintera l’image qu’ils projetteront de l’entreprise, alors qu’une bonne réputation suscitera la bienveillance des pouvoirs publics, ce qui n’est pas à négliger. Surtout, une image de marque irréprochable deviendra pour l’organisation un bouclier contre les assauts de concurrents trop agressifs et lui garantira un capital de sympathie fort utile en situation de crise. Il faut beaucoup de temps pour bâtir une bonne réputation mais, comme pour un arbre majestueux, il en faut très peu pour l’abattre : il vous faut savoir qu’une crise ou quelques erreurs de gestion suffiront parfois pour anéantir des années d’efforts. Puisque la perte de sa réputation et de son image de marque constitue un dommage aussi important, on pourrait s’attendre à ce que les organisations se soient donné des signaux d’alarme efficaces pour déceler à temps les risques au potentiel négatif sur sa réputation ou son image. C’est hélas rarement le cas.

Répondre aux signaux d’alarme

Voici des situations qui devraient faire qu’une lumière rouge s’allume au tableau de bord de votre organisation. Chacune est un signe avant-coureur d’une crise :

Un concurrent ou une compagnie sœur ont récemment vécu une crise. On observe souvent un effet domino dans des organisations d’un même secteur d’activités, notamment dans des entreprises du secteur financier où la confiance des consommateurs est un élément-clé du développement, voire de la survie de l’organisation.

Les employés peuvent être les meilleurs comme les pires ambassadeurs, surtout par le biais des médias sociaux. Notamment dans les organisations de type chaîne ou grande surface, le recrutement peut devenir plus difficile si certains employés se servent de Twitter et de Facebook pour raconter leur « expérience malheureuse ».

L’entreprise a des problèmes de qualité pour certains de ses produits. Ou encore, la publicité a été trop agressive et a survendu les qualités des produits ou des services offerts et les consommateurs commencent à le réaliser.

Le service après-vente est déficient. Les plaintes des clients devraient faire retentir une sonnette d’alarme. Les cadres supérieurs de l’entreprise y prêtent-ils attention ?

Les politiques de l’entreprise ne sont pas à jour (voire inexistantes), et il n’y a pas de stratégie de mise en œuvre pour celles qui existent, laissant toute la place à l’arbitraire de celles et ceux chargés de les appliquer.

Le propriétaire de l’entreprise ou le président ont mauvaise réputation et leur arrogance indispose leurs partenaires. Rappelons-nous l’attitude des hauts dirigeants du secteur automobile, alors qu’ils s’étaient rendus en jet privé rencontrer les membres du Congrès des États-Unis pour réclamer une aide financière pour sauver l’industrie… Ou encore celle des partenaires impliqués dans l’explosion de la plate-forme Horizon dans le Golfe du Mexique, ayant provoqué l’un des désastres écologiques les plus importants de la planète. Ils se sont chamaillés comme des enfants devant les parlementaires américains qui réclamaient des explications.

La situation financière de l’organisation est déficiente ou instable depuis longtemps. RIM (Blackberry) nous offre un exemple éloquent de cette difficulté.

La qualité des relations entre l’organisation et les médias n’est pas très bonne et rien n’est fait pour les améliorer sous prétexte que : «  Pour vivre heureux, vivons cachés ».

L’organisation a déjà subi une crise et la situation n’est pas encore totalement rétablie.

Éviter ces erreurs impardonnables

Plusieurs organisations ne portent pas attention à ces signaux d’alarme ou elles ne sont pas organisées pour en prendre compte. Elles commettent ou ont commis à cet égard des erreurs impardonnables :

Elles n’ont pas jugé utile de se doter d’un plan de gestion de crise ou n’ont pas fait de simulation pour tester leur plan avant que la crise éclate.

Elles ont fait la sourde oreille aux signes avant-coureurs de la crise et se sont laissé surprendre.

Elles ont répondu trop lentement lors du déclenchement de la crise. Par exemple, elle a frappé au cours de la fin de semaine alors que les responsables étaient en vacances ou à l’extérieur en congrès.

Personne n’a vraiment réalisé l’ampleur de la crise qui se préparait et on a tardé à prendre les dispositions nécessaires ou à déclencher le plan d’escalade prévu au plan de gestion de crise.

On a joué à l’autruche en pensant qu’en ne communiquant pas, personne ne s’en rendrait compte.

On a refusé de traiter sérieusement les plaintes et les réclamations de clients mécontents; on a pratiqué la « langue de bois ». Ou pire, on a menti. Durant une crise, lorsque le brasier fera rage, tout ce que nous avons dit pourra et sera même certainement retenu contre nous.

Elles ont ignoré les demandes des médias. Il faut toujours se rappeler que si nous ne sommes pas légalement obligés de parler aux médias, eux peuvent parler de nous en toute légalité. Et, il y a toujours « des amis qui nous veulent du bien » qui voudront répondre à leurs questions à notre place.

Comment réussir une gestion de crise efficace ? Dix commandements nous y aideront. Ce sera l’objet d’une prochaine chronique.

____________________________________

*Richard Thibault, ABCP, est président de RTCOMM, une entreprise spécialisée en positionnement stratégique et en gestion de crise. Menant de front des études de Droit à l’Université Laval de Québec, une carrière au théâtre, à la radio et à la télévision, Richard Thibault s’est très tôt orienté vers le secteur des communications, duquel il a développé une expertise solide et diversifiée. Après avoir été animateur, journaliste et recherchiste à la télévision et à la radio de la région de Québec pendant près de cinq ans, il a occupé le poste d’animateur des débats et de responsable des affaires publiques de l’Assemblée nationale de 1979 à 1987. Richard Thibault a ensuite tour à tour assumé les fonctions de directeur de cabinet et d’attaché de presse de plusieurs ministres du cabinet de Robert Bourassa, de conseiller spécial et directeur des communications à la Commission de la santé et de la sécurité au travail et de directeur des communications chez Les Nordiques de Québec.

En 1994, il fonda Richard Thibault Communications inc. (RTCOMM). D’abord spécialisée en positionnement stratégique et en communication de crise, l’entreprise a peu à peu élargi son expertise pour y inclure tous les champs de pratique de la continuité des affaires. D’autre part, reconnaissant l’importance de porte-parole qualifiés en période trouble, RTCOMM dispose également d’une école de formation à la parole en public. Son programme de formation aux relations avec les médias est d’ailleurs le seul programme de cette nature reconnu par le ministère de la Sécurité publique du Québec, dans un contexte de communication d’urgence. Ce programme de formation est aussi accrédité par le Barreau du Québec. Richard Thibault est l’auteur de Devenez champion dans vos communications et de Osez parler en public, publié aux Éditions MultiMondes et de Comment gérer la prochaine crise, édité chez Transcontinental, dans la Collection Entreprendre. Praticien reconnu de la gestion des risques et de crise, il est accrédité par la Disaster Recovery Institute International (DRII). http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=46704908&locale=fr_FR&trk=tyah

Article récent de Richard Thibault sur le sujet de la gestion de crise :

Sept leçons apprises en matière de communications de crise (www.jacquesgrisegouvernance.com)

Gestion de crise : Sept conseils pour éviter les surprises


Cette semaine, nous avons demandé à Louis Aucoin*, associé principal chez OCTANE STRATEGIES | COMMUNICATIONS, d’agir à titre d’auteur invité. Son billet, publié sur le blogue de l’entreprise, expose sept conseils utiles aux gestionnaires et aux membres de C.A. pour éviter d’être confrontés à de mauvaises surprises dans une situation de crise. Voici donc l’article en question, reproduit ici avec la permission de l’auteur. Vos commentaires sont appréciés. Bonne lecture.

Gestion de crise : Sept conseils pour éviter les surprises

Par Louis Aucoin*

Une bonne partie de la gestion de crise consiste surtout à gérer l’effet de surprise… Réduisez cet effet de surprise au maximum afin de savoir si vous faites face – ou non – à une véritable crise. Voici sept conseils pour y parvenir.

1.  Ça n’arrive pas qu’aux autres

Pensez-y   bien… une erreur de livraison peut-elle être fatale ? Votre environnement de   travail est-il vraiment inoffensif ? De qui dépendez-vous le plus pour la conduite de vos affaires ? Ensuite, prenez toutes les idées « qui n’arriveront jamais » et reconsidérez-les encore. Juste pour voir.

2.  C’est qui le patron ici ?

On remet souvent la gestion de crise dans les mains du patron seulement. Oups ! Et qu’est-ce qu’on fait s’il est pas là ? Assurez-vous qu’en cas de crise, tous les membres de l’entreprise se tournent vers la bonne personne et que cette personne soit capable d’assumer le leadership requis.

3.  On commence par où ? Prévoyez les deux premières étapes

À moins d’utiliser des produits chimiques ou radioactifs, plusieurs petites entreprises n’ont surtout besoin que de prévoir les deux premières étapes :

  1. Mise en œuvre de la chaîne de commandement   (qui doit être informé en premier);
  2. Réaffectation des ressources   (l’organisation doit pouvoir continuer ses opérations).

Ainsi, l’entreprise est déjà en situation de prendre les décisions nécessaires à la fois pour fonctionner et pour gérer la crise.

Crises
Crises (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4.    Assurez-vous de la cohésion interne

Prendre le temps d’informer les membres de l’organisation peut vous être d’un immense secours. De même, l’équipe décisionnelle doit prendre ses décisions d’un commun accord, quitte à y consacrer de précieuses minutes. Pas de succès externe sans cohésion interne.     

5.  Parlez aux médias quand vous serez prêt

Bien des situations ne nécessitent pas que l’entreprise s’adresse aux médias. Mais lorsqu’il le faut, vous devez être prêt. Avant de retourner l’appel d’un journaliste, convenez des messages que vous souhaitez transmettre, puis choisissez la meilleure personne pour ce faire. Surtout pas d’improvisation ! Mieux vaut manquer le prochain bulletin de nouvelles que d’y figurer par sa propre faute !     

6.  Faites-vous durer la crise ? Une poursuite en justice… un communiqué de presse le lendemain… une lettre ouverte de vengeance… accepter une entrevue la semaine suivante… Voilà quelques-uns des moyens les plus   efficaces de faire durer les crises. Soyez vigilant et faites appel à des spécialistes en relations publiques pour vous soutenir dans la prise de décision. Ne perdez pas de vue votre objectif : mettre fin à la crise au plus vite.

7.  Chanceux ! Une « opportunité » ! Aussi curieux que cela puisse paraître, vous trouverez peut-être que votre crise renferme une opportunité. N’est-ce pas un bon moment de renouer avec vos anciens clients ? Avec un peu de créativité, vous pourriez même y gagner gros.

______________________________

*À titre d’associé principal, Louis Aucoin, MPA, est spécialisé en relations publiques et en politiques publiques. Du fait de sa formation de maîtrise en administration publique et de son expérience professionnelle, il possède une expertise pointue des relations avec les médias et de la gestion stratégique des enjeux de l’administration publique. Avant de se joindre à Stratégies | Communications, Louis Aucoin a assumé la direction des communications d’un parti politique majeur, y occupant également les fonctions de conseiller aux affaires parlementaires et d’attaché de presse.

Un guide essentiel pour comprendre et enseigner la gouvernance | Version française


Plusieurs administrateurs et formateurs me demandent de leur proposer un document de vulgarisation sur le sujet de la gouvernance. J’ai déjà diffusé sur mon blogue un guide à l’intention des journalistes spécialisés dans le domaine de la gouvernance des sociétés à travers le monde. Il a été publié par le Global Corporate Governance Forum et International Finance Corporation (un organisme de la World Bank) en étroite coopération avec International Center for Journalists. Je n’ai encore rien vu de plus complet et de plus pertinent sur la meilleure manière d’appréhender les multiples problématiques reliées à la gouvernance des entreprises mondiales. La direction de Global Corporate Governance Forum m’a fait parvenir le document en français le 14 février.

Qui dirige l’entreprise : Guide pratique de médiatisation du gouvernement d’entreprise – document en français

Ce guide est un outil pédagogique indispensable pour acquérir une solide compréhension des diverses facettes de la gouvernance des sociétés. Les auteurs ont multiplié les exemples de problèmes d’éthiques et de conflits d’intérêts liés à la conduite des entreprises mondiales. On apprend aux journalistes économiques – et à toutes les personnes préoccupées par la saine gouvernance – à raffiner les investigations et à diffuser les résultats des analyses effectuées. Je vous recommande fortement de lire le document, mais aussi de le conserver en lieu sûr car il est fort probable que vous aurez l’occasion de vous en servir.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous quelques extraits de l’introduction à l’ouvrage.

Who’s Running the Company ? A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance

À propos du Guide

English: Paternoster Sauqre at night, 21st May...

« This Guide is designed for reporters and editors who already have some experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how a company is governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Topics include the media’s role as a watchdog, how the board of directors functions, what constitutes good practice, what financial reports reveal, what role shareholders play and how to track down and use information shedding light on a company’s inner workings. Journalists will learn how to recognize “red flags,” or warning  signs, that indicate whether a company may be violating laws and rules. Tips on reporting and writing guide reporters in developing clear, balanced, fair and convincing stories.

Three recurring features in the Guide help reporters apply “lessons learned” to their own “beats,” or coverage areas:

– Reporter’s Notebook: Advise from successful business journalists

– Story Toolbox:  How and where to find the story ideas

– What Do You Know? Applying the Guide’s lessons

Each chapter helps journalists acquire the knowledge and skills needed to recognize potential stories in the companies they cover, dig out the essential facts, interpret their findings and write clear, compelling stories:

  1. What corporate governance is, and how it can lead to stories. (Chapter 1, What’s good governance, and why should journalists care?)
  2. How understanding the role that the board and its committees play can lead to stories that competitors miss. (Chapter 2, The all-important board of directors)
  3. Shareholders are not only the ultimate stakeholders in public companies, but they often are an excellent source for story ideas. (Chapter 3, All about shareholders)
  4. Understanding how companies are structured helps journalists figure out how the board and management interact and why family-owned and state-owned enterprises (SOEs), may not always operate in the best interests of shareholders and the public. (Chapter 4, Inside family-owned and state-owned enterprises)
  5. Regulatory disclosures can be a rich source of exclusive stories for journalists who know where to look and how to interpret what they see. (Chapter 5, Toeing the line: regulations and disclosure)
  6. Reading financial statements and annual reports — especially the fine print — often leads to journalistic scoops. (Chapter 6, Finding the story behind the numbers)
  7. Developing sources is a key element for reporters covering companies. So is dealing with resistance and pressure from company executives and public relations directors. (Chapter 7, Writing and reporting tips)

Each chapter ends with a section on Sources, which lists background resources pertinent to that chapter’s topics. At the end of the Guide, a Selected Resources section provides useful websites and recommended reading on corporate governance. The Glossary defines terminology used in covering companies and corporate governance ».

Here’s what Ottawa’s new rules for state-owned buyers may look like (business.financialpost.com)

The Vote is Cast: The Effect of Corporate Governance on Shareholder Value (greenbackd.com)

Effective Drivers of Good Corporate Governance (shilpithapar.com)

Un guide essentiel pour comprendre et enseigner la gouvernance


Plusieurs administrateurs et formateurs me demandent de leur proposer un document de vulgarisation sur le sujet de la gouvernance. J’ai déjà diffusé sur mon blogue un guide à l’intention des journalistes spécialisés dans le domaine de la gouvernance des sociétés à travers le monde. Il a été publié par le Global Corporate Governance Forum et International Finance Corporation (un organisme de la World Bank) en étroite coopération avec International Center for Journalists. Je n’ai encore rien vu de plus complet de plus et de plus pertinent sur la meilleure manière d’appréhender les multiples problématiques reliées à la gouvernance des entreprises mondiales. La direction de Global Corporate Governance Forum m’a fait parvenir le document en français le 14 février.

Qui dirige L’entreprise : Guide pratique de médiatisation du gouvernement d’entreprise – document en français

Ce guide est un outil pédagogique indispensable pour acquérir une solide compréhension des diverses facettes de la gouvernance des sociétés. Les auteurs ont multiplié les exemples de problèmes d’éthiques et de conflits d’intérêts liés à la conduite des entreprises mondiales. On apprend aux journalistes économiques – et à toutes les personnes préoccupées par la saine gouvernance – à raffiner les investigations et à diffuser les résultats des analyses effectuées. Je vous recommande fortement de lire le document, mais aussi de le conserver en lieu sûr car il est fort probable que vous aurez l’occasion de vous en servir.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous quelques extraits de l’introduction à l’ouvrage.

Who’s Running the Company ? A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance

À propos du Guide

English: Paternoster Sauqre at night, 21st May...

« This Guide is designed for reporters and editors who already have some experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how a company is governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Topics include the media’s role as a watchdog, how the board of directors functions, what constitutes good practice, what financial reports reveal, what role shareholders play and how to track down and use information shedding light on a company’s inner workings. Journalists will learn how to recognize “red flags,” or warning  signs, that indicate whether a company may be violating laws and rules. Tips on reporting and writing guide reporters in developing clear, balanced, fair and convincing stories.

Three recurring features in the Guide help reporters apply “lessons learned” to their own “beats,” or coverage areas:

– Reporter’s Notebook: Advise from successful business journalists

– Story Toolbox:  How and where to find the story ideas

– What Do You Know? Applying the Guide’s lessons

Each chapter helps journalists acquire the knowledge and skills needed to recognize potential stories in the companies they cover, dig out the essential facts, interpret their findings and write clear, compelling stories:

  1. What corporate governance is, and how it can lead to stories. (Chapter 1, What’s good governance, and why should journalists care?)
  2. How understanding the role that the board and its committees play can lead to stories that competitors miss. (Chapter 2, The all-important board of directors)
  3. Shareholders are not only the ultimate stakeholders in public companies, but they often are an excellent source for story ideas. (Chapter 3, All about shareholders)
  4. Understanding how companies are structured helps journalists figure out how the board and management interact and why family-owned and state-owned enterprises (SOEs), may not always operate in the best interests of shareholders and the public. (Chapter 4, Inside family-owned and state-owned enterprises)
  5. Regulatory disclosures can be a rich source of exclusive stories for journalists who know where to look and how to interpret what they see. (Chapter 5, Toeing the line: regulations and disclosure)
  6. Reading financial statements and annual reports — especially the fine print — often leads to journalistic scoops. (Chapter 6, Finding the story behind the numbers)
  7. Developing sources is a key element for reporters covering companies. So is dealing with resistance and pressure from company executives and public relations directors. (Chapter 7, Writing and reporting tips)

Each chapter ends with a section on Sources, which lists background resources pertinent to that chapter’s topics. At the end of the Guide, a Selected Resources section provides useful websites and recommended reading on corporate governance. The Glossary defines terminology used in covering companies and corporate governance ».

Here’s what Ottawa’s new rules for state-owned buyers may look like (business.financialpost.com)

The Vote is Cast: The Effect of Corporate Governance on Shareholder Value (greenbackd.com)

Effective Drivers of Good Corporate Governance (shilpithapar.com)

Bulletin d’information du Collège des administrateurs (CAS) | Novembre 2012


Le bulletin d’information de novembre 2012 du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés vient d’être publié. Bonne lecture.

 
logo-cas.gif

Bulletin d’information du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS) | Novembre 2012

Grande conférence en gouvernance :

le Collège reçoit Monique F. Leroux

 

Monique F. Leroux

Le Collège des administrateurs de sociétés est fier d’annoncer sa 7e Grande conférence en gouvernance de sociétés, qui aura lieu le mercredi 6 février 2013. Lors de l’événement, Mme Monique F. Leroux, présidente du conseil et chef de la direction du Mouvement Desjardins, agira à titre de conférencière. Plus de renseignements sur la conférence seront dévoilés sous peu.

La soirée se déroulera sur le Parquet du Centre CDP Capital, à Montréal, dès 17 h. Un cocktail dînatoire suivra la conférence.

N.B. : Le Collège offrira gracieusement aux participants de Québec un service d’autocar faisant l’aller-retour à Montréal.À mettre à votre agenda. Inscription sous peu.

Pour en savoir plus [+]

 

Capsule : le développement durable

Le développement durable, par Johanne Gélinas[+] Pour visionner

 

 

Par Johanne Gélinas

Associée

Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton

Notre experte, Johanne Gélinas, explique comment le développement durable est une autre façon de penser le développement d’une entreprise et le rôle des administrateurs à cet égard.

Un guide essentiel pour investiguer et publier les problématiques reliées à la gouvernance corporative


Ce formidable guide à l’intention des journalistes spécialisés dans le domaine de la gouvernance des sociétés à travers le monde a été publié par le Global Corporate Governance Forum et International Finance Corporation (un organisme de la World Bank) en étroite coopération avec International Center for Journalists. Je n’ai encore rien vu de plus complet et pertinent sur la meilleure manière d’appréhender les multiples problématiques reliées à la gouvernance des entreprises mondiales.

Ce guide est un outil pédagogique indispensable pour acquérir une solide compréhension des diverses facettes de la gouvernance des sociétés. Les auteurs ont multiplié les exemples de problèmes d’éthiques et de conflits d’intérêts liés à la conduite des entreprises mondiales. On apprend aux journalistes économiques – et à toutes les personnes préoccupées par la saine gouvernance – à raffiner les investigations et à diffuser les résultats des analyses effectuées. Je vous recommande fortement de lire le document, mais aussi de le conserver en lieu sûr car il est fort probable que vous aurez l’occasion de vous en servir. Vous trouverez ci-dessous quelques extraits de l’introduction à l’ouvrage.

Who’s Running the Company ? A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance

À propos du Guide

« This Guide is designed for reporters and editors who already have some experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how a company is governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Topics include the media’s role as a watchdog, how the board of directors functions, what constitutes good practice, what financial reports reveal, what role shareholders play and how to track down and use information shedding light on a company’s inner workings. Journalists will learn how to recognize “red flags,” or warning  signs, that indicate whether a company may be violating laws and rules. Tips on reporting and writing guide reporters in developing clear, balanced, fair and convincing stories.

 

Three recurring features in the Guide help reporters apply “lessons learned” to their own “beats,” or coverage areas:

– Reporter’s Notebook: Advise from successful business journalists

– Story Toolbox:  How and where to find the story ideas

– What Do You Know? Applying the Guide’s lessons  The World Development Report 2011

Each chapter helps journalists acquire the knowledge and skills needed to recognize potential stories in the companies they cover, dig out the essential facts, interpret their findings and write clear, compelling stories:

  1. What corporate governance is, and how it can lead to stories. (Chapter 1, What’s good governance, and why should journalists care?)
  2. How understanding the role that the board and its committees play can lead to stories that competitors miss. (Chapter 2, The all-important board of directors)
  3. Shareholders are not only the ultimate stakeholders in public companies, but they often are an excellent source for story ideas. (Chapter 3, All about shareholders)
  4. Understanding how companies are structured helps journalists figure out how the board and management interact and why family-owned and state-owned enterprises (SOEs), may not always operate in the best interests of shareholders and the public. (Chapter 4, Inside family-owned and state-owned enterprises)
  5. Regulatory disclosures can be a rich source of exclusive stories for journalists who know where to look and how to interpret what they see. (Chapter 5, Toeing the line: regulations and disclosure)
  6. Reading financial statements and annual reports — especially the fine print — often leads to journalistic scoops. (Chapter 6, Finding the story behind the numbers)
  7. Developing sources is a key element for reporters covering companies. So is dealing with resistance and pressure from company executives and public relations directors. (Chapter 7, Writing and reporting tips)

Each chapter ends with a section on Sources, which lists background resources pertinent to that chapter’s topics. At the end of the Guide, a Selected Resources section provides useful websites and recommended reading on corporate governance. The Glossary defines terminology used in covering companies and corporate governance ».

Here’s what Ottawa’s new rules for state-owned buyers may look like (business.financialpost.com)

The Vote is Cast: The Effect of Corporate Governance on Shareholder Value (greenbackd.com)

Effective Drivers of Good Corporate Governance (shilpithapar.com)

Le C.A. et l’utilisation des médias sociaux


Voici un document très utile pour les membres de conseils d’administration qui souhaitent se familiariser avec les médias sociaux (les réseaux sociaux). L’article énonce 6 raisons pour lesquelles un C.A. a besoin de comprendre les médias sociaux afin de les utiliser à bon escient. Également on y énumère 10 erreurs à éviter dans l’utilisation des réseaux sociaux. Je vous encourage à lire l’article au complet.

Social Media Camp - NYC - 2011

 

Social Media and the Board

« Many boards, especially with older directors, look at Facebook or Twitter as something they don’t understand and don’t want to kn ow. Boards, even if they are using social media, are doing it wrong—using Facebook pages or tweets merely as bulletin boards rather than tools to form board to stakeholder relationships. But, social media can be useful to the Board if used correctly. Creating online content is not an easy task. Nor is it easy to develop relationships with the stakeholders of the Board of Directors. Communication is the doorway and, in today’s transitioning society, social media is the key ». 

Vidéo corporative | CAS – Collège des administrateurs de sociétés


Vidéo corporative du Collège

Le Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS) travaille sans relâche à faire connaître l’avantage ASC et la qualité de sa formation. C’est dans cette optique que le Collège a récemment produit une vidéo corporative. Le Collège est fier de vous présenter sa vidéo corporative et de vous faire vivre l’expérience du Collège en 2 minutes.

Vidéo corporative | CAS – Collège des administrateurs de sociétés

Visionnez aussi la publicité de 30 secondes [+] 

Bulletin d’information du Collège des administrateurs (CAS) – Septembre 2012


logo-cas.gif

Le bulletin d’information de septembre 2012 du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés vient d’être publié. Bonne lecture.

Bulletin du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS) | Septembre 2012

C’est avec fierté que le Collège des administrateurs de sociétés vous présente son rapport d’activité 2011-2012, une rétrospective complète de la septième année d’existence du CAS, de ses réalisations et faits saillants. Le bilan de cette année est sans contredit très positif et marque, entre autres, l’atteinte du cap impressionnant des 500 diplômés du programme de certification universitaire en gouvernance de sociétés.

Rapport d'activité 2011-2012

Rapport d’activité  du CAS 2011-2012

Les médias sociaux : Risques que les entreprises considèrent parmi les plus élevés !


Plusieurs entreprises se méfient comme de la peste des risques que posent les médias sociaux ! Et plusieurs pensent que ceux-ci seront parmi les plus importantes sources de risques dans les trois prochaines années. Nous avons déjà montré que cette nouvelle approche de communication pouvait receler de grands avantages pour les organisations qui sont préparées à y faire face. Cependant, l’article de Ken Tysiac paru dans CGMA nous met en garde contre les risques potentiels associés à l’utilisation des médias sociaux. Qu’en pensez-vous ? Sommes-nous trop frileux ? Comment composer avec cette nouvelle réalité ?

« But a survey of US executives, including many at multinational companies, found social media is one of the top five risks organisations face. The Deloitte & Touche LLP report Aftershock: Adjusting to the New World of Risk Management said that 27% of survey respondents predicted social media would be among the most important risk sources over the next three years.
Risk
Risk (Photo credit: The Fayj)

The global economic environment (41%), government spending (32%) and regulatory changes (30%), respectively, were the top three expected risks identified by executives in the survey – and the only ones named by a higher percentage of respondents than social media.
“Social media wasn’t even on the radar a few years ago – now it’s ranked among the top five sources of risk,” Henry Ristuccia, Governance, Regulatory & Risk leader at Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, said in a news release ».

“The rise of social media is just another contributor to the volatile global risk environment that companies are being forced to navigate.”

Le PCD doit perfectionner ses habiletés à utiliser et à confronter les médias !


Reuters Newsmaker event - Ted Turner
Reuters Newsmaker event – Ted Turner (Photo credit: caribbeanfreephoto)

Les aptitudes à la communication sont de plus en plus perçues comme essentielles à la réussite comme Président et chef de la direction (PCD) des sociétés, plus particulièrement celles reliées à maîtrise  des communications publiques comme les vidéos corporatifs, les entrevues en direct, les vidéos publiées sur YouTube, les téléconférences par SKYPE, les discours de positionnement stratégique et l’utilisation des médias sociaux tels que Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.

Cet article, publié dans International Business Times | ExpertNetwork, montre toute l’importance que les hauts dirigeants doivent consacrer à leurs activités de communications publiques en ces temps de besoins d’une plus grande transparence.

Celebrity Executives: The New C-Suite Reality

 

« The sooner an executive develops their ability to jump on camera to comfortably and confidently share their views, the more likely they are to be selected for high-profile positions and to be the spokesperson in moments of incredible visibility. Don’t make your first « live » video moment be one where you are unprepared to make a good impression. The likelihood of it being something critical (i.e. damage control, communications spin), is high, while your ability to knock it out of the park will be low. »