Indice de diversité de genre | Equilar


Voici le dernier rapport de l’indice de diversité de genre (GDI) publié par Amit Batish, de la firme-conseil Equilar Inc.

Le texte est très explicite et abondamment illustré.

Dans l’ensemble, le pourcentage de femmes siégeant à des conseils d’administration du Russell 3000 est passé de 16,9 % à 17,7 % entre le 31 mars et le 30 juin 2018.

Durant la même période, plus du tiers des postes d’administrateurs ont été pourvus par des femmes.

Bonne lecture !

 

For a third consecutive quarter, the Equilar Gender Diversity Index (GDI) increased. The percentage of women on Russell 3000 boards increased from 16.9% to 17.7% between March 31 and June 30, 2018. This acceleration moved the needle, pushing the GDI to 0.35, where 1.0 represents parity among men and women on corporate boards.

One of the primary drivers of this steady GDI increase is the number of new directorships that have gone to women over the last few quarters. The chart below illustrates a consistent pace of growth of female directorships. In Q2 2018, more than one-third of new directorships went to women—this is a near three percentage point increase from the previous quarter and a pace that has almost doubled since 2014.

 

 

“In the first half of 2018 over 30% of newly-elected directors were women, which we believe indicates that companies are changing their approach to diversity,” said Brigid Rosati, Director of Business Development at Georgeson.

“It seems that companies are beginning to better understand the benefits that a more diverse board can bring, but are also in some cases responding to signs of increased interest from investors, including in the way they vote in director elections.”

 

 

In Q1 2018 the percentage of all male Russell 3000 boards fell to 19.5%, the first time ever that this figure sat below 20%. That figure continued to dip in Q2 2018, falling to 17.1%—a 2.4 percentage point drop. This data is certainly a promising sign that boards are making a concerted effort to promote diversity in the boardroom and that male-dominant boardrooms are becoming less prevalent. However, this is still a relatively sizable figure that indicates possible hurdles do indeed remain.

“Progress on diversity continues to be slow but it is continuing to move for the most part,” said Susan Angele, Senior Advisor of Board Governance at KPMG’s Board Leadership Center.

“Depending on the board’s own network, it may take a larger investment of time and effort to find the right person to add diversity as well as skill set, and having a diversity champion on the board driving the search may make a difference.”

 

Pressure Begins to Mount From Investors and Lawmakers

 

One of the many reasons that boards have lagged progress on the topic of diversity is that historically, there has been little pressure from investors or other key stakeholders to regularly advocate for such initiatives.

However, over the last year or so, gender diversity has become an area of focus across corporate America. There have been numerous efforts from various sources including institutional investors, regulators and lawmakers. In the Q1 2018 GDI report, Equilar cited 2017 as being banner year for shareholder engagement around gender diversity on boards, beginning with State Street’s “Fearless Girl” statue of a young woman facing o with the Wall Street Bull to bring awareness to gender diversity.

The gesture won a major advertising award, but State Street also voted against hundreds of directors on boards that did not have women. Subsequently, BlackRock voted in favor of several shareholder proposals that requested more disclosure around diversity in 2017, and earlier in 2018, sent letters to all Russell 1000 companies that had fewer than two women on their boards.

“In addition to investor focus, I see a confluence of events that should play out over time,” said Angele.

“The changes in the business environment and expectations on boards—including technological disruption, competition coming from outside the industry, changing demographics, culture and risk—all of these forces are making it more important for the boardroom to include directors with a mix of backgrounds and experience.”

Additionally, lawmakers have begun to get more involved with issues regarding gender diversity. For instance, by August 31, 2018, California could become the first state in the nation to mandate publicly held companies that base their operations in the state to have women on their boards. The legislation—SB 826—will require public companies headquartered in California to have a minimum of one female on its board of directors by December 31, 2019. That minimum will be raised to at least two female board members for companies with five directors or at least three female board members for companies with six or more directors by December 31, 2021. Violators of this legislation will be subject to financial consequences.

A new Equilar study examined how California fared against the United States as a whole with respect to women on boards. According to the study, California is slightly below other states and the national average in terms of average women on a board. California, on average, has 1.65 female members per board, whereas other states and the United States as a whole average 1.76 and 1.75 female members, respectively.

 

 

As legislators become more involved in matters of diversity, one might expect that progress toward greater female board representation will continue. The last few quarters alone have shown signs of progress, and this is before any significant quotas had been put in place. It would come as no surprise that the number of boards achieving parity continues to increase year-over-year following implementation of gender quotas across the nation.

Boards That Have Reached Parity Are Becoming More Prevalent

 

In combination of numerous factors, some previously mentioned in this article, since the inception of the GDI study, the number of Russell 3000 boards that achieved gender parity has steadily increased in most quarters. The Q2 2018 GDI revealed the largest quarter-over-quarter increase in the number of boards that have achieved parity to date, reaching 39—an increase of eight from the previous quarter and a spike of 18 from the end of 2016. The list of boards at parity is at the bottom of this article.

The number of boards that have between 40% and 50% is rising regularly as well. Collectively, 71 boards now have at least 40% women, up from 62 in the previous quarter.

“Several large institutional investors updated their proxy voting policies in 2018, which we think could continue to drive change beyond the significant progress we saw in the first half of 2018,” said Rosati. “Beyond this, we believe that continued media coverage and scrutiny means that we will see continued pressure from investors towards companies with zero women on their boards.”

___________________________________________________________________________

About Equilar Gender Diversity Index

The Equilar GDI reflects changes on Russell 3000 boards on a quarterly basis as cited in 8-K lings to the SEC. Most indices that track information about board diversity do so annually or even less frequently, and typically with a smaller sample size, sometimes looking back more than a full year by the time the information is published. While this data is reliable and accurate, the Equilar GDI aims to capture the influence of the increasing calls for diversity from investors and other stakeholders in real time.

Le point sur la future loi californienne eu égard aux quotas de femmes sur les CA


Voici un article de Tomas Pereira, analyste de recherche à Equilar Inc, publié sur le site du Harvard Law School Forum qui fait le point sur la future loi californienne eu égard aux quotas de femmes sur les CA.

L’étude présente des statistiques intéressantes sur la situation des femmes sur les CA en Californie et fait état de projections concernant l’effet des mesures. Rappelons que l’état de la Californie est le premier état qui s’aventure dans l’établissement de quotas pour favoriser la diversité sur les conseils d’administration.

La législation propose qu’une entreprise ait au moins une femme sur le CA au 31 décembre 2019,

That minimum will be raised to at least two female board members for companies with five directors or at least three female board members for companies with six or more directors by December 31, 2021.

Ainsi en 2021, les conseils d’administration devront compter au moins trois femmes sur les CA, si le nombre d’administrateurs est de six ou plus.

Bonne lecture !

 

Gender Quotas in California Boardrooms

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « Gender Quotas in California Boardrooms »

 

By August 31, 2018, California could become the first state in the nation to mandate publicly held companies that base their operations in the state to have women on their boards. The legislation—SB 826—will require public companies headquartered in California to have a minimum of one female on its board of directors by December 31, 2019. That minimum will be raised to at least two female board members for companies with five directors or at least three female board members for companies with six or more directors by December 31, 2021.

If SB 826 is passed in the Assembly and signed by Governor Jerry Brown, corporations not compliant with the new rules will be subjected to financial consequences. Strike one will be accompanied with a fine equal to the average annual cash compensation of directors. Any subsequent violation would amount to a fine equal to three times the average annual cash compensation for directors. Hence, the consequences are very real for companies that choose not to comply with the new rules.

A new study by Equilar looks at where public companies headquartered in California currently lie in relation to the proposed legislation. The study includes public companies in California that have annual revenues of $5 million or more—amounting to a total of 211 companies with an aggregate of 349 female and 1,466 male board members.

 

Looking broadly, California is slightly below other states and the national average in terms of average women on a board. California, on average, has 1.65 female members per board, whereas other states and the United States as a whole average 1.76 and 1.75 female members, respectively. This type of statistic is a likely factor in spurring state legislators in Sacramento to make significant changes to the status quo and place California in a leading role for board diversity in the United States.

 

By 2019, most companies in California would be safe from any financial penalties for having an insufficient number of female board members. As it stands now, 82% of public companies in California who have annual revenues of over $5 million will meet the initial criteria, whereas 18% will not. Consequently, 37 public companies would be faced with a fine equal to the average annual director compensation for failing to comply.

In the following table, Equilar examined the 82% success rate a bit further and broke it down by sector in order to examine which industries are driving the rates of success and failure. By 2019, the basic materials and utilities sectors in California would both have a 100% success rate. Thus, every company within these two sectors has at least one female director present on their board. The next sector with the highest rate of success is services, with 92% having at least one female member. Both the healthcare and technology sectors are tied for lowest compliance at 83% pass.

 

When looking at the companies that would meet the secondary December 31, 2021 criteria, the picture is much bleaker at present for public companies in California. According to the proposed legislation, the required minimum would increase to two female board members for companies with five total directors or to three female board members for companies with at least six total directors.

 

Taking that future criteria and applying it to today, 79% of public companies would fail, while only 21% would pass. The following table sees basic materials—one of the sectors with 100% company success rate with the previous 2019 criteria—fall down to a 50-50 ratio of pass to fail. The sector with the highest success rate is utilities, while the industrial goods sector has the lowest success rate at 75% and 14%, respectively.

 

While the path for the proposed legislation is still a bit rocky, the broader trend towards diversifying boardrooms across the country is growing. Companies should anticipate new legislation—not just SB 826—sprouting throughout more state legislatures and get ahead of this rolling tide. States like Maine, Illinois and Ohio have already begun promoting resolutions to encourage companies to diversify their boards. In addition, BlackRock and other institutional investors have publicly stated that they will expect at least two female members per board. The push towards gender diversification is well warranted. Studies by management consulting firms, such as Boston Consulting Group and McKinsey & Co., have shown that diverse boards perform better financially. Signs do point to a gradual progression towards gender parity in the boardroom, as noted by the Q1 2018 Equilar Gender Diversity Index. However, without proactive encouragement or legislation, it would take decades before a true gender balance is realized.

La gouvernance française suit-elle la tendance mondiale ?


Afin de donner suite à mon billet du 20 octobre, intitulé « Quelles tendances en gouvernance, identifiées en 2014, se sont avérées », dans lequel Marianne Hugoo, rédactrice au sein de l’Hebdo des AG, un média numérique qui se consacre au traitement des sujets touchant à la gouvernance des entreprises françaises, m’avait demandé si les 12 grandes tendances que j’avais identifiées en 2014 s’étaient effectivement avérées en 2017, au regard de la situation française.

J’avais alors préparé quelques réflexions en référence aux douze tendances identifiées dans l’article du Journal Les Affaires de 2014.

Aujourd’hui, je vous fais part des résultats de l’enquête, parus dans la revue l’Hebdo des AG (no 151 | 23 octobre 2017), qui présentent la situation de la gouvernance en France.

Il m’est toujours apparu important d’avoir une vue globale des facteurs qui affectent la gouvernance dans les entreprises étrangères, notamment les entreprises françaises.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont les bienvenus.

 

La gouvernance française suit-elle la tendance mondiale ?

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « La gouvernance française suit-elle la tendance mondiale ? »

 

 

Suivant 10 axes de comparaison, l’Hebdo des AG a confronté les données factuelles sur les Conseils français après les AG 2017 avec les travaux de Jacques Grisé, Président de l’Ordre des administrateurs agréés du Québec (sic, président sortant) et Directeur des programmes de formation en gouvernance (sic, ex-directeur) au Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS). Il identifiait en 2014 les tendances de gouvernance à mettre sous surveillance et a réagi sur les observations de notre Enquête.

La gouvernance française suit la tendance mondiale sur les grands enjeux : la prise en compte de la montée de l’activisme actionnarial, l’épée de Damoclès du Say-on-Pay comme juge de paix.

Il reste des « exceptions françaises » : l’une est la féminisation des Conseils, oui la France est en avance ! Les autres relèvent de la structure des travaux du Conseil et peut-être au poids prépondérant du dirigeant en France : les Conseils sont moins indépendants et moins ouverts à l’évaluation extérieure.

Les 4 thèmes qui inscrivent la gouvernance des entreprises françaises dans la tendance mondiale :

  1. En France comme ailleurs, l’administrateur a 59 ans en moyenne : c’est une personne à la fois expérimentée et en âge d’exercer une activité professionnelle
  2. Les administrateurs sont de plus en plus formés
  3. Le Say-on-Pay joue le rôle de juge de paix sur la satisfaction des actionnaires
  4. L’enjeu aujourd’hui : le rôle des investisseurs activistes

Les 6 « exceptions françaises »,

  1. La dissociation des pouvoirs n’est toujours pas d’actualité en France — mais pas non plus aux États-Unis
  2. Les Conseils d’administration se sont féminisés, en France plus qu’ailleurs due à l’effet de la loi Copé-Zimmerman
  3. Cette féminisation est souvent allée de pair avec l’internationalisation des Conseils français, sujet qui n’est pas identifié comme tendance mondiale.
  4. La taille des Conseils en France est stable à 12-13 administrateurs, elle se réduit dans les autres pays
  5. Les Conseils français sont moins indépendants — un sujet de débat sur la définition même de l’indépendance
  6. Les Conseils ont partout mis en place des procédures d’évaluation — mais il s’agit encore souvent, en France, d’auto-évaluation

 

 

L’ENQUÊTE

 

  1. En France, comme ailleurs, l’administrateur a 59 ans en moyenne : c’est une personne à la fois expérimentée et en âge d’exercer une activité professionnelle

 

Il y a 10 ans, 28 % des Conseils américains avaient une moyenne d’âge de 59 ans ou moins contre 15 % aujourd’hui. La moyenne d’âge des administrateurs américains est de 63 ans.

L’âge moyen des administrateurs français ne bouge pas : il était de 59 ans pour le SBF 120 en 2014 et l’est toujours en 2017. Le reste des Conseils européens se situent dans la même moyenne.

Ce chiffre indique que la plupart des administrateurs français ne sont pas « retraités », mais en activité. Il exclut également, de fait, la notion d’« administrateur indépendant professionnel », vivant uniquement de ses mandats.

 

  1. Les administrateurs sont de plus en plus formés

 

Selon Jacques Grisé, ce sont les « compétences et les expériences reliées au secteur d’activité de l’entreprise qui sont très recherchées ».

En France, l’IFA a mis en place en 2010, en partenariat avec l’IEP (« Sciences Po »), une formation d’administrateur certifié. Depuis 2014, le nombre de certificats délivrés a crû de 5,56 % en passant de 108 certificats délivrés en 2014 à 114 certificats en 2016.

Déjà en 2013, le Code de Gouvernance insistait sur la formation des administrateurs : « chaque administrateur bénéficie, s’il le juge nécessaire, d’une formation complémentaire sur les spécificités de l’entreprise, ses métiers et son secteur d’activité. »

Par ailleurs, toutes les sociétés pour lesquelles s’applique le Code de gouvernance doivent mentionner les domaines de compétences de leurs administrateurs dans leur communication annuelle avec les actionnaires à travers leur document de référence.

Certaines sociétés vont encore plus loin en institutionnalisant au sein des Conseils des équipes dédiées à la recherche d’expertises clés. En effet, comme le mentionne par exemple le document de référence 2016 d’ENGIE, il a été décidé de mettre en place « le recensement des expertises clés des administrateurs ».

 

  1. Le Say-on-Pay joue le rôle de juge de paix sur la satisfaction des actionnaires

 

Jacques Grisé souligne le caractère « toujours potentiellement conflictuel » de la situation entre « les intérêts des actionnaires et la responsabilité des administrateurs envers toutes les parties prenantes ».

La contestation se cristallise sur le Say-on-Pay

En France depuis la loi Sapin II, les actionnaires votent sur la rémunération des dirigeants — consultatif jusqu’ici, décisif à partir de 2018.

Pour mémoire, ils ont rejeté, en 2016, la rémunération de Carlos Ghosn, PDG de Renault, et celle de Patrick Kron, PDG d’Alstom ; en 2017, celle de Jean-Pierre Rémy, PDG de Solocal Group, et celle de Philippe Salle, PDG d’Elior. Dans chacun de ces cas, les Conseils ont révisé leur proposition.

Des scores d’élection d’administrateurs toujours très hauts : les actionnaires, quand ils sont mécontents, ne mettent pas en cause les administrateurs.

De manière générale, les actionnaires votent moins facilement les nominations de nouveaux administrateurs par rapport aux taux d’approbation de 2014. Cependant, les scores restent très hauts et il n’y a donc pas de quoi penser que les actionnaires se servent de cette tribune pour faire valoir leurs droits.

 

  1. L’enjeu aujourd’hui : le rôle des investisseurs activistes

 

Dans tous les pays, l’activisme progresse. Un point commun est le fondement de leur argumentaire : il s’agit, souvent, d’une question de transparence ou de gouvernance. La question est de savoir si les interventions de ces investisseurs activistes sont, à long terme, négatives ou positives pour la gouvernance, dans la mesure où les investisseurs obtiennent souvent une accélération de la transformation de l’entreprise, mais n’y restent pas. Une préoccupation commune à toutes les entreprises cette année.

Jacques Grisé identifie l’aiguillon des investisseurs activistes comme important, car ils « minent l’autorité du Conseil d’administration en s’adressant directement aux actionnaires ». Quatre ans plus tard, « force est de constater que l’activisme est en pleine croissance partout dans le monde et que les effets souvent décriés des activistes sont de plus en plus acceptés comme bénéfiques ».

 

  1. La dissociation des pouvoirs n’est toujours pas d’actualité en France — mais pas non plus aux États-Unis

 

En 2014, Jacques Grisé s’attendait à une « valorisation du rôle du Président du Conseil », faisant contrepoids au DG — dans un contexte où les PDG étaient déjà très majoritaires en France.

Au Canada, le rôle du Chairman est mis en avant. Les États-Unis, souligne Jacques Grisé, sont « plus lents à adopter la séparation des fonctions entre Chairmen et CEO ».

La France suit sur ce point la tendance des États-Unis : le CAC 40 compte 65 % de PDG et le NEXT 80 en compte 50 %.

 

  1. Les Conseils d’administration se sont féminisés, en France, plus qu’ailleurs — l’effet de la loi Copé-Zimmerman

 

En 2014, Jacques Grisé prévoyait que « la diversité au sein du Conseil deviendrait un sujet de gouvernance incontournable ».

Jacques Grisé, en 2017, souligne que la tendance américaine « de diminution (sic, de la taille) des Conseils ralentit quelque peu l’accession des femmes aux postes d’administratrices », ce qui n’est pas le cas en France. La loi Copé-Zimmerman a imposé le quota de 40 % de femmes administrateurs.

 

  1. Cette féminisation est souvent allée de pair avec l’internationalisation des Conseils français, sujet qui n’est pas identifié comme tendance mondiale

 

Les Conseils français se sont rapidement dotés de nombreux administrateurs étrangers afin de remplir les critères de diversité recommandés par le Code de Gouvernance (Afep MEDEF).

Même si certaines sociétés, comme AMUNDI, n’ont aucun administrateur étranger au sein du Conseil, elles intègrent une représentation étrangère dans d’autres instances. Amundi a par exemple mis en place un « comité consultatif composé de grands experts économiques et politiques de renommée internationale ».  Le taux moyen d’internationalisation des Conseils du SBF 120 est passé de 16 % en 2013 à 24 % 3 n 2017.

 

  1. La taille des Conseils en France est stable à 12-13 administrateurs, elle est plus faible dans d’autres pays

 

Outre-Atlantique, la réduction de la taille des Conseils prédite par Jacques Grisé s’est confirmée au Canada. Cependant, aux États-Unis, le nombre moyen de membres par Conseil a augmenté : depuis 10 ans, la moyenne se situe autour de 10 membres pour les entreprises du S&P 500.

En France, le nombre d’administrateurs moyen par Conseil est resté stable autour de 12 ou 13, ce qui reste supérieur à la moyenne américaine.

 

  1. Les Conseils français sont moins indépendants qu’ailleurs et une bonne définition de l’indépendance persiste

 

Jacques Grisé prévoyait une plus grande indépendance des Conseils.

Pour les besoins de cette Enquête, nous retiendrons comme définition de l’indépendance celle donnée par chaque société, ce qui est la méthode retenue par l’AMF : est indépendant un administrateur qualifié par la société comme indépendant, même si des associations comme l’AFG ou des proxy advisors comme ISS ou Proxinvest ont un comptage différent.

L’indépendance des Conseils, quant à elle, augmente progressivement. En effet, elle a grimpé de 3 points entre 2014 et 2016.  Le taux moyen d’internationalisation des Conseils du SBF 120 est passé de 42 % en 2014 à 47 % en 2016.

 

  1. Les Conseils ont partout mis en place des procédures d’évaluation — mais il s’agit encore souvent, en France, d’auto-évaluation

Notre spécialiste affirme que « l’évaluation de la performance des Conseils d’administration est devenue une pratique quasi universelle ». En France comme aux États-Unis ou au Canada, les Conseils des sociétés cotées ont mis en place des procédures d’évaluations de leurs travaux.

Cependant, si dès 2014, Jacques Grisé notait qu’aux États-Unis « les sociétés font déjà appel à des firmes extérieures pour mener cette évaluation », il n’en est pas de même en France où la forme la plus habituelle est celle de l’auto-évaluation.

__________________________________

Enquête réalisée par Marianne Hugoo

La composition de votre CA est-elle adéquate pour faire face au futur ? | Résultats d’une étude américaine de PwC


Au fil des ans, j’ai publié plusieurs billets sur la composition des conseils d’administration. Celle-ci devient un enjeu de plus en plus critique pour les investisseurs et les actionnaires en 2017. Voici les billets publiés qui traitent de la composition des conseils d’administration :

La composition du conseil d’administration | Élément clé d’une saine gouvernance

Conseils d’administration d’OBNL : Problèmes de croissance et composition du conseil

Approche stratégique à la composition d’un conseil d’administration (1re partie de 2)

Approche stratégique à la composition d’un conseil d’administration (2e partie de 2)

L’évolution de la composition des conseils d’administration du CAC 40 ?

Priorité à la diversité sur les conseils d’administration | Les entreprises à un tournant !

Bâtir un conseil d’administration à « valeur ajoutée »

Assurer une efficacité supérieure du conseil d’administration 

Enquête mondiale sur les conseils d’administration et la gouvernance 

Le rapport 2016 de la firme ISS sur les pratiques relatives aux conseils d’administration 

L’article publié par Paula Loop, directrice du Centre de la gouvernance de PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), est très pertinent pour tous les CA de ce monde. Il a été publié sur le forum du Harvard Law School on Corporate Governance.

Même si l’étude de PwC concerne les entreprises américaines cotées en bourse (S&P 500), les conclusions s’appliquent aussi aux entreprises canadiennes.

Le sujet à l’ordre du jour des Boards est le renouvellement (refreshment) du conseil afin d’être mieux préparé à affronter les changements futurs. Le CA a-t-il la composition optimale pour s’adapter aux nouvelles circonstances d’affaires ?

La recherche de PwC a porté sur les résultats de l’évolution des CA dans neuf (9) secteurs industriels. Dans l’ensemble, 91 % des administrateurs croient que la diversité contribue à l’efficacité du conseil. De plus, 84 % des administrateurs lient la variable de la diversité à l’accroissement de la performance organisationnelle.

L’auteure avance qu’il existe trois moyens utiles aux fins du renouvellement des CA :

  1. Une plus grande diversité ;
  2. La fixation d’un âge limite et d’un nombre de mandats maximum ;
  3. L’évaluation de la séparation des rôles entre la présidence du conseil (Chairperson) et la présidence de l’entreprise (CEO).

L’article est très intéressant en raison des efforts consentis à la présentation des résultats par l’illustration infographique. Le tableau présenté en annexe est particulièrement pertinent, car on y trouve une synthèse des principales variables liées au renouvellement des CA selon les neuf secteurs industriels ainsi que l’indice du S&P 500.

Au Canada, les recherches montrent que les entreprises sont beaucoup plus proactives eu égard aux facteurs de renouvellement des conseils d’administration.

Bonne lecture !

Does your board have the right makeup for the future?

 

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « composition du conseil d'administration »

 

Board composition is “the” issue for investors in 2017. Some industries are taking more steps to refresh their board than others—how does yours stack up? As the economic environment changes and lines between industries start to blur, companies are looking for directors with different, less traditional and even broader skills. Technology skills will be key across sectors.

Who’s sitting in your boardroom? Do your directors bring the right mix of skills, experiences and expertise to best oversee your company? Are they a diverse group, or a group with common backgrounds and outlooks? Can they help see into the future and how your industry is likely to take shape? And are some of your directors serving on your board as well as those in other industries?

These questions should be top of mind for executives and board members alike. Why? Because the volume of challenges companies are facing and the pace of change has intensified in recent years. From emerging technologies and cybersecurity threats to new competitors and changing regulatory requirements, companies–and their boards–have to keep up. Some boards have realized that having board members with multiple industry perspectives can prove helpful when navigating the vast amount of change businesses are faced with today.

If your board isn’t thinking about its composition and refreshment, you are opening up the door to scrutiny. Board composition is “the” issue for investors in 2017. Investors want to know who is sitting in the boardroom and whether they are the best people for the job. If they don’t think you have the right people on the board, you will likely hear about it. This is no longer something that is “nice” to think about, it’s becoming something boards “must” think about. And think about regularly.

How can you refresh your board?

 

In 2016, we analyzed the board demographics of select companies in nine industries to see how they compared to each other and to the S&P 500. Where does your industry fall when it comes to board refreshment? Does your board have the right makeup for the future?

 

There are a number of ways to refresh your board. One way is to think about diversity. Many have taken on the gender imbalance on their boards and are adding more women directors. But diversity isn’t only about women. It’s about race, ethnicity, skills, experience, expertise, age and even geography. It’s about diversity of thought and perspective. And it’s not just a talking point anymore. Regulators started drafting disclosure rules around board diversity in mid-2016. Whether the rules become final remains to be seen, but either way, board diversity is in the spotlight. Add to that the common criticism that the US is far behind its developed country peers. Norway, France and the Netherlands have been using quotas for a while, and Germany in 2015 passed a law mandating 30% women on the boards of its biggest companies. While it’s unlikely quotas would be enacted in the US, some believe they’re a needed catalyst.

 

 

While we only looked at gender diversity on boards, we believe this is a good indicator of the efforts some boards are making to become more diverse overall. Secondly, mandatory retirement ages and term limits are two tools that boards can use to refresh itself. Our analysis showed that some industries seemed to be adopting these provisions more so than others. Some directors question their effectiveness.

Some of the industries in our PwC peer group analysis don’t have term limits at all

Banking and capital markets

Insurance

Communications

Technology

A third move that some companies have taken often, under investor pressure—is to evaluate their leadership structure and split the chair and CEO role. While the issue is still one that investors care about, certain industries have kept the combined role. And some companies don’t plan on making the change any time soon. Most often, boards with a combined chair/CEO role have an independent lead or presiding director. This may ease concerns that institutional investors and proxy firms may have about independence in the leadership role.

 

Who would have thought? Some interesting findings

 

While our analysis shows that most industries didn’t veer too far from the S&P 500 averages for most benchmarking categories, a few stand out. Retail in particular seems to be leading the charge when it comes to board refreshment.

 

 

Other industries aren’t moving along quite so quickly. And there were some surprises. Which industry had the lowest average age? Perhaps surprisingly, it’s not technology. Retail claimed that one, too. And, also unexpected, was that technology had one of the highest average tenures. [6] Another surprising finding came from our analysis of the banking and capital markets industry—an industry that’s often considered to be male-dominated. BCM boards had the highest percentage of women, at 26%. That compares to just 21% for the S&P 500. Both the entertainment and media and the communications industries were also ahead of the curve when it comes to women in the boardroom, with the highest and second-highest percentages of new female directors. Retail tied with communications for second-highest, as well.

 

On a less progressive note, both the entertainment and media and communications industries were below the S&P 500 average when it came to having an independent lead or presiding director when the board chair is not independent. And they ranked lowest of the industries we analyzed on this topic—by far.

Blurred lines across industries

 

Skills, experience and diversity of thought will likely become even more important in the coming years. In the past five years alone, once bright industry lines have started to blur. Take the retail industry, for example. Brick and mortar stores, shopping malls and strip malls were what used to come to mind when thinking about that industry. Now it’s mobile devices and drones. Across many industries, business models are changing, competitors from different industries are appearing and new skills are needed. The picture of what your industry looks like today may not be the same in just a few years.

Technology is the key to much of this change. Just a few years ago, many boards were not enthusiastic about the idea of adding a director solely with technology or digital skills. But times are changing. Technology is increasingly becoming a critical skill to have on the board. We consulted our experts in the nine industries we analyzed, and all of them put technology high on the “must-have” list for new directors. Interestingly, financial, operational and industry experience—the top three from our 2016 Annual Corporate Directors Survey, were not among the most commonly listed.

Taking a fresh look

 

If your company is shifting gears and changing the way it does business, it may be important to take a fresh look at your board composition at more frequent intervals. Some boards use a skills matrix to see what they might be lacking in their board composition. Others may be forced by a shareholder activist to add new skills to the board.

 

 

So how do you fill the holes in the backgrounds or skills you want from your directors? One way is to look to other industries. As our analysis shows, board composition and refreshment approaches vary by industry. As industry lines blur, other industry perspectives could compliment your company—it might be helpful to consider filling any holes with board members from other industries.

No matter which approach you take, it’s very important to think about your board’s composition proactively. Use your board evaluations to understand which directors have the necessary skills and expertise—and which might be lacking what the board needs. Think about your board holistically as you think about your company’s future. Your board composition is critical to ensuring your board is effective—and keeping up with the world outside the boardroom.

 

Appendix

 

How do our industry peer groups stack up to the S&P 500? Making this evaluation can be a good way to begin determining whether your board has the right balance in terms of board composition.

 

 

Analysis excludes two companies that are newer spinoffs.
Analysis excludes one company that does not combine or separate the roles.
Excludes the tenure of one newly-formed company.
Four of the five companies that have a mandatory retirement age have waived or state that the board can choose to waive it.

Sources: Spencer Stuart, U.S. Board Index 2016, November, 2016; PwC analysis of US SEC registrants: 27 of the largest industrial products companies by market capitalization and revenue, May 2016; 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue, May 2016; 21 of the largest banking and capital markets companies by revenue, September 2016; 24 of the largest insurance companies by market capitalization, May 2016; 17 of the largest entertainment and media companies by revenue, May 2016; nine of the largest communications companies by revenue, May 2016; 25 of the largest power and utilities companies by revenue, October 2016; 16 of the largest technology companies by revenue, May 2016; 23 of the largest pharma/life sciences companies by revenue, May 2016.


Endnotes:

1Sources: PwC, 2016 Annual Corporate Directors Survey, October 2016; Spencer Stuart, 2016 US Board Index, November 2016.(go back)

2Sources: PwC analysis of 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 25 of the largest power and utilities companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, October 2016; Spencer Stuart, U.S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

3Sources: PwC analysis of 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 17 of the largest entertainment and media companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

4Sources: PwC analysis of 21 of the largest banking and capital markets companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, September 2016; PwC analysis of 16 of the largest technology companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

5Sources: PwC analysis of US SEC registrants: nine of the largest communications companies by revenue, May 2016; 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue, May 2016; 21 of the largest banking and capital markets companies by revenue, September 2016; 24 of the largest insurance companies by market capitalization, May 2016; 16 of the largest technology companies by revenue, May 2016; 17 of the largest entertainment and media companies by revenue, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, U.S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

6Analysis excludes two companies that are newer spinoffs.(go back)

7Sources: PwC analysis of 16 of the largest technology companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, U.S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

8Sources: PwC analysis of 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 21 of the largest banking and capital markets companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, September 2016; Spencer Stuart, U.S. Board Index 2016, November, 2016(go back)

9Sources: PwC analysis of 17 of the largest entertainment and media companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of nine of the largest communications companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, S. Board Index 2016, November 2016.(go back)

10Sources: PwC analysis of 17 of the largest entertainment and media companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of nine of the largest communications companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; Spencer Stuart, S. Board Index 2016, November 2016; PwC analysis of 11 of the largest retail companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 21 of the largest banking and capital markets companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, September 2016; PwC analysis of 24 of the largest insurance companies by market capitalization that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 16 of the largest technology companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016; PwC analysis of 23 of the largest pharma/life sciences companies by revenue that are also US SEC registrants, May 2016.

Survey concernant les pratiques de gouvernance des sociétés | Silicon Valley et S&P 100


Voici une étude vraiment très intéressante publiée par David A. Bell* associé de la firme Fenwick & West LLP, et paru sur le blogue du Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance.

L’auteur étudie les caractéristiques des pratiques de gouvernance des entreprises du Silicon Valley 150 Index [SV 150] et des sociétés publiques du S&P 100 et il décortique les changements significatifs au cours des dernières années eu égard aux éléments suivants :

Actions à multiples votes — leur utilisation a triplé depuis 4 ans dans les entreprises du Silicon Valley 150 Index [SV 150].

Élection d’administrateurs à des périodes différentes [Classified Boards] — peu de changement à cet égard, les entreprises en faisant usage encore à environ 50 %

Administrateurs internes — le nombre d’administrateurs issus de la direction est en diminution constante depuis 5 ans.

Leadership du CA — la combinaison des rôles de président du conseil et de PDG est encore très importante dans les deux cas. Les entreprises de la Silicon Valley sont moins susceptibles d’avoir le même président du conseil et PDG (35 % des entreprises du SV 150, comparé à 76%des sociétés du S&P 100).

Diversité des genres — on constate un accroissement du nombre de femmes sur les conseils. Les femmes représentent 19,1 % des membres des 15 plus grandes entreprises du SV 150 et 21,6 % des femmes du S&P 100.

Vote à la majorité —le vote à la majorité est de plus en plus adopté par les sociétés du S&P 100 (92 %), comparativement aux entreprises du SV 150 (47 %).

Règles concernant l’acquisition d’actions par la direction — elles sont de plus en plus répandues (96 % dans les sociétés du S&P 100, comparées à 61 % dans les entreprises du SV 150)

Administrateurs dirigeants — on note une diminution significative du nombre d’administrateurs provenant de la haute direction des entreprises au cours de 10 dernières années (de 8,8 à 6,2 dans les entreprises du SV 150, et de 13,2 à 10,7 dans les sociétés du S&P 100).

Je vous invite à lire l’article au complet si vous souhaitez avoir plus d’information sur l’une ou l’autre de ces pratiques. Voici un résumé des principales conclusions.

Bonne lecture !

Corporate Governance Survey—2015 Proxy Season

 

t_corp

 

Since 2003, Fenwick has collected a unique body of information on the corporate governance practices of publicly traded companies that is useful for Silicon Valley companies and publicly-traded technology and life science companies across the U.S. as well as public companies and their advisors generally. Fenwick’s annual survey covers a variety of corporate governance practices and data for the companies included in the Standard & Poor’s 100 Index (S&P 100) and the high technology and life science companies included in the Silicon Valley 150 Index (SV 150). [1]

Significant Findings

Governance practices and trends (or perceived trends) among the largest companies are generally presented as normative for all public companies. However, it is also somewhat axiomatic that corporate governance practices should be tailored to suit the circumstances of the individual company involved. Among the significant differences between the corporate governance practices of the SV 150 high technology and life science companies and the uniformly large public companies of the S&P 100 are:

  1. Dual-class Stock. There is a clear multi-year trend of increasing use of dual-class stock structures among SV 150 companies, which allow founders or other major long-term holders to retain control of a company through special shares with outsized voting rights. Their use has tripled since 2011 to 9.4%, up from 2.9%.
  2. Classified Boards. Companies in the S&P 100 have inherent protection from hostile takeovers in part due to their much larger size, so we’ve seen them declassify in recent years from ~47% a little more than a decade ago down to only 10% in the 2015 proxy season (though that is unchanged from 2014). During that same 10 year period the number of SV 150 companies with classified boards has held firm at ~45%, though with the top 15 companies in Silicon Valley (measured by revenue) now having rates lower than their S&P 100 peers.
  3. Insiders. While there has been a longer term downward trend in insiders in both groups, the percentage of insider directors has held essentially steady over the past five years in the SV 150 but has declined slightly in the S&P 100 over the same period.
  4. Board Leadership. Silicon Valley companies are also substantially less likely to have a combined chair/CEO (35% compared to 76% in the S&P 100). Where there is a board chair separate from the CEO, the S&P 100 are about as likely as SV 150 companies to have a non-insider chair (in the 2015 proxy season, 58% compared to 60%, respectively).
  5. Gender Diversity. Overall, 2015 continued the long term trend in the SV 150 of gradually increasing numbers of women directors (both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of board members), as well as the trend of declining numbers of boards without women members. The rate of increase for the SV 150 continues to be higher than among S&P 100 companies. Women directors make up an average of 19.1% of board members among the top 15 companies of the SV 150, compared to 21.6% among their peers in the S&P 100. The number of SV 150 companies without women directors fell to 48 (compared to 57 in the 2014 proxy season and 72 companies as recently as the 2012 proxy season).
  6. Majority Voting. While there is a clear trend toward adoption of some form of majority voting in both groups, the rate of adoption remains substantially higher among S&P 100 companies (92% compared to 47% of SV 150 companies in the 2015 proxy season, in each case unchanged from the 2014 proxy season), although in the S&P 100 majority voting declined 5% from the 2011 proxy season (compared to an 11% increase for the SV 150).
  7. Stock Ownership Guidelines. Stock ownership guidelines for executive officers remain substantially more common among S&P 100 companies (in the 2015 proxy season, 96% compared to 61% in the SV 150), though there was a marked increase among the SV 150 in the 2015 proxy season. There has been a substantial increase for both groups over the course of the survey (from 58% for the S&P 100 and 8% for the SV 150 in 2004), including a 9% increase in the SV 150 over the last year. Similar trends hold for stock ownership guidelines covering board members (although the S&P 100 percentage is about 10% lower for directors compared to officers over the period of the survey, while the SV 150 has been slightly higher for directors compared to officers in recent years).
  8. Executive Officers. In both groups there has been a long-term, slow but steady decline in the average number of executive officers per company, as well as a narrowing in the range of the number of executive officers in each group, which continued in the 2015 proxy season. The SV 150 moved from an average of 8.8, maximum of 18 and minimum of 4 in the 1996 proxy season to an average of 6.2, maximum of 14 and minimum of 2 in the 2012 proxy season. The S&P 100 companies moved from an average of 13.2, maximum of 41 and minimum of 5 in 1996 proxy season to an average of 10.7, maximum of 21 and minimum of 3 in the 2014 proxy season.

Complete Coverage

In complete publication, available here, we present statistical information for a subset of the data we have collected over eleven years. These include:

– makeup of board leadership

– number of insider directors

– gender diversity on boards of directors

– size and number of meetings for boards and their primary committees

– frequency and number- of other standing committees

– majority voting

– board classification

– use of a dual-class voting structure

– frequency and coverage of executive officer and director stock ownership guidelines

– frequency and number of shareholder proposals

– number of executive officers

In each case, comparative data is presented for the S&P 100 companies and for the high technology and life science companies included in the SV 150, as well as trend information over the history of the survey. In a number of instances we also present data showing comparison of the top 15, top 50, middle 50 and bottom 50 companies of the SV 150 (in terms of revenue), [2] illustrating the impact of company size or scale on the relevant governance practices.

The complete publication is available here.


*David A. Bell is partner in the corporate and securities group at Fenwick & West LLP. This post is based on portions of a Fenwick publication titled Corporate Governance Practices and Trends: A Comparison of Large Public Companies and Silicon Valley Companies (2015 Proxy Season).

Quotas de diversité aux conseils d’administration : Qu’en est-il aujourd’hui ?


Je cède régulièrement la parole à Johanne Bouchard* à titre d’auteure invitée sur mon blogue en gouvernance. Celle-ci a une solide expérience d’interventions de consultation auprès de conseils d’administration de sociétés américaines ainsi que d’accompagnements auprès de hauts dirigeants de sociétés publiques (cotées), d’organismes à but non lucratif (OBNL) et d’entreprises en démarrage.

Dans ce billet, elle nous donne son point de vue sur l’approbation de quota de diversité aux conseils d’administration. C’est un sujet de grande actualité, et l’expérience varie passablement d’une autorité réglementaire à une autre.

Il ressort de cela que de plus en plus d’autorités réglementaires sont tentées par l’imposition de cibles à atteindre en matière de diversité, notamment eu égard à la représentation des femmes sur les conseils d’administration. Dans ce billet, elle nous présente son point de vue pour une meilleure diversité et elle nous instruit sur les mesures adoptées dans d’autres pays.

L’expérience de Johanne Bouchard auprès d’entreprises cotées en bourse est soutenue ; elle en tire des enseignements utiles pour tous les conseils d’administration.

Bonne lecture ! Vos commentaires sont toujours accueillis favorablement.

 

Quotas de diversité aux conseils d’administration : Qu’arrive-t-il maintenant?

par

Johanne Bouchard

board-diversity_forbes

 

À l’échelle mondiale, l’appel à la diversité est lancé. Récemment, particulièrement au cours de cette dernière année, il y a eu beaucoup de battage autour de la question des quotas. Notamment, de nombreux gouvernements ont pris des mesures en vue d’imposer des quotas aux conseils d’administration.

Puisque je prône un rendement optimal de la gouvernance des conseils d’administration et de la composition de tout type de conseils d’administration, particulièrement et surtout quand le besoin se fait sentir de revitaliser les conseils d’administration d’entreprises, je pense que la diversité doit être la première idée qui nous vient à l’esprit.

Bien que, selon moi, la diversité au sein des conseils d’administration inclue les femmes, la connaissance et l’expérience internationale, la connaissance de l’industrie, l’ethnicité et l’âge, je veux ici porter mon attention aux efforts actuels de générer un plus grand équilibre au sein de nos conseils d’administration en ce qui concerne l’égalité des genres.

J’écris aujourd’hui pour éveiller la conscience sur la question des quotas imposés aux conseils d’administration. Pourquoi devons-nous tous être très vigilants à ce sujet, pour qu’ensemble nous puissions observer attentivement les vagues que cela crée à travers le monde? Environ, une douzaine de pays, qui ont moins de 10 % de femmes administratrices au sein de leurs conseils d’administration, ont appliqué les quotas avant même de voir des résultats concrets et d’observer les conséquences que ceux-ci pouvaient avoir sur le comportement des individus, le processus de recrutement et la parité des chances entre les femmes et les hommes.

Les quotas imposés aux conseils d’administration sont établis pour augmenter la représentation des femmes aux conseils d’administration, dans l’espoir que cette représentativité se retransmettra aux autres enjeux liés à l’inégalité des genres dans le monde des affaires, dans tous les secteurs des entreprises, à l’intérieur de nos établissements scolaires, dans nos organisations politiques et gouvernementales sur toute la planète.

Le fait étant qu’en 2015, les femmes sont encore sous-représentées dans les rôles de leadership où elles peuvent exceller et avoir une incidence. Elles ne sont pas rémunérées sur la même échelle que leurs collègues masculins et la présence des femmes (particulièrement importante pour moi) à STEM (Science, technologie, ingénierie, mathématiques) est loin d’avoir atteint un niveau acceptable dans plusieurs universités.

Il y a une tendance en Europe et au Canada à légiférer sur l’augmentation de la présence des femmes sur les conseils d’administration, afin d’accélérer une croissance qui ne s’est pas faite naturellement. Les États-Unis montent la garde, et plusieurs croient que les quotas américains sont improbables.

Le débat autour de cette tendance réfère aux aspects plus controversés d’une action affirmative et aux avantages des quotas à long terme. Les statistiques démontrent que les quotas produisent des changements immédiats quant à la diversité des genres dans tous les pays qui les appliquent, mais des questions se posent quant à leurs bienfaits à long terme et à leur valeur symbolique.

Regardons ce qui se passe maintenant avec la diversité aux conseils d’administration

Alison Smale et Claire Cain Miller ont signalé, dans le magazine The New York Times (le 6 mars 2015), que :

« L’Allemagne a adopté une loi contraignant quelques-unes des plus grandes entreprises en Europe à attribuer 30 % des postes de supervision aux femmes, à partir de l’année prochaine. Moins de 20 % des sièges aux conseils d’administration en Allemagne sont occupés par des femmes, alors que certaines des plus grandes entreprises multinationales au monde y sont installées (dans ce pays), incluant Volkswagen, BMW et Daimler (le fabriquant des véhicules Mercedes-Benz) de même que Siemens, Deutsche Bank, BASF, Bayer et Merck. »

Dans cet article, le ministre de la Justice de l’Allemagne était cité alors qu’il affirmait que, « pour l’Allemagne (la loi est) la plus grande contribution à l’égalité des genres depuis l’obtention du droit de vote accordé aux femmes » (en Allemagne en 1918).

En Norvège, l’adoption des quotas relatifs au genre au sein des conseils d’administration des entreprises était une première, comme l’expliquait The Economist dans son article de mars 2014 « L’expansion des quotas relatifs au genre au sein des conseils d’administration ». Le quota de 40 % attribué aux femmes aux postes d’administration dans des entreprises cotées en Bourse est entré en vigueur en 2008, et « les entreprises non conformes pouvaient, en principe, être dissoutes par la force, bien qu’aucune n’ait eu à subir un tel sort. »

L’adoption des quotas relatifs au genre au sein des conseils d’administration en Norvège a provoqué un changement important à court terme quant à la présence des femmes au sein des conseils. Selon l’article de Danielle Paquette, paru dans The Washington Post (le 9 février 2015) « Pourquoi les Américaines détestent les quotas dans les conseils d’administration », le changement n’a pas encore infiltré d’autres enjeux d’inégalité de genre dans l’environnement des entreprises en Norvège.

Le Royaume-Uni n’a encore pris aucune mesure législative à date. Plutôt, une initiative, appelée « le Club 30 % » a été lancée en 2010. Helena Morrissey, la chef de la direction et fondatrice de Newton Investment Management et du Club 30 %, a indiqué : « Nous croyons que plus les femmes siègent aux conseils d’administration sans l’imposition des quotas, plus elles peuvent prouver leur valeur ajoutée. D’ici à ce qu’on atteigne le 30 %, le système s’autoperpétuera. »

En juin 2014, au Canada, à la suite du rapport fédéral du conseil consultatif, on a demandé aux plus importantes entreprises d’augmenter le nombre de femmes au sein de leur conseil d’administration, recommandant une augmentation de 30 % de la présence des femmes à leur conseil d’administration, mais sans quotas ni exigences réglementaires.

L’approche, à laquelle on réfère par l’expression « conformez-vous et expliquez », exige que les entreprises divulguent les statistiques relatives à la diversité, ce qui nous l’espérons, amènera les 500 plus grandes entreprises à procéder aux changements nécessaires. À la fin de 2015, l’Ontario, a pris l’initiative d’imposer des modifications législatives, puisque les entreprises ne coopéraient pas volontairement à la demande d’augmenter le nombre de femmes aux postes de leadership.

Les États-Unis sont à la traîne ; à cet égard ! Ainsi qu’il a été publié dans Fortune (le 13 janvier 2015) : « Les femmes gagnent des sièges aux conseils d’administration à l’échelle mondiale, mais pas aux États-Unis. » Selon l’index de recensements Catalyst 2014 Census Index, 19,2 % des sièges des conseils d’administration des entreprises inscrites au S&P 500 sont occupés par des femmes ; les États-Unis ne prennent aucune mesure dynamique pour faire bouger l’aiguille.

Les progrès à reconnaître la potentialité des femmes comme candidates aux conseils d’administration sont lents aux États-Unis. Cependant, un certain nombre d’initiatives telles que The Thirty Percent Coalition, 2020 Women on Boards et The Alliance for Board Diversity (ABD), démystifient le processus et accélèrent la diversification des conseils d’administration.

La définition du mot quota dans le dictionnaire Merriam Webster’s m’a fait grincer les dents : « an official limit on the number or amount of people or things that are allowed », c’est-à-dire une limite officielle du nombre ou du montant de personnes ou de choses autorisées. Selon moi, au 21e siècle, la limitation et la restriction ne devraient pas être la méthode à prendre pour atteindre l’objectif de la composition optimale des conseils d’administration et d’un équilibre naturel des compétences au sein du conseil.

La seconde définition de quota est : « a specific amount or number that is expected to be achieved », soit une quantité ou un nombre précis que l’on s’attend à atteindre, ce qui m’est apparu comme une manière tout à fait inacceptable de parler de la présence des femmes à la table des conseils d’administration et dans des postes de leadership. Les valeurs numériques ne créent pas l’impression de renforcement. Le pouvoir vient du fait d’inclure les femmes parce qu’elles peuvent contribuer de manière significative au conseil d’administrateur.

La troisième définition est : « the number or amount constituting a proportional share », soit un nombre ou un montant représentant une part proportionnelle, une définition avec laquelle je ne me sentais pas plus à l’aise. La composition du conseil d’administration n’est pas qu’une question de « part proportionnelle », mais la question est plutôt d’atteindre un niveau optimal de diversité en priorisant la connaissance, l’expérience, l’éducation et les liens internationaux — puis de s’assurer qu’il n’existe pas de discrimination relative au genre, à l’ethnie, à l’âge et à l’origine des candidats.

***

En tant que femme qui a l’intention de siéger à plusieurs conseils d’administration et qui a conseillé des conseils d’administration de différents types et de différentes tailles, j’ai observé et j’ai fait l’expérience directe que les femmes ont été sous-représentées dans les salles des conseils d’administration, et le sont encore. Le fait est que la plupart de mes clients aux conseils d’administration étaient des hommes.

La plupart des conseils d’administration des entreprises publiques avec lesquels j’ai travaillé étaient principalement composés d’hommes, tandis que les conseils d’administration d’organismes à but non lucratif avaient atteint un meilleur équilibre entre les hommes et les femmes. Cependant, j’ai rarement fait personnellement l’expérience de discrimination dirigée directement contre les femmes dans le processus de sélection d’un nouvel administrateur.

J’ai observé et remarqué les avantages que pouvait apporter la présence d’une femme au conseil d’administration (et il y a des études qui démontrent ce que j’ai moi-même observé). Bien que la plupart des conseils d’administration des entreprises de mes clients aient été composés d’hommes à 99 %, quand je leur ai suggéré d’augmenter la mixité des genres au sein de leur conseil, ils ont tous bien accueilli cette recommandation. Leur principale question a été de savoir comment trouver le meilleur talent avec les qualités qu’ils recherchaient alors qu’ils augmentaient et revitalisaient leur conseil d’administration.

En conclusion, le débat est vif, et il y a des arguments puissants pour et contre les quotas. J’ai voulu poser la question autrement, en parlant directement aux personnes qui font partie des statistiques. Donc, un prochain billet regroupera les commentaires collectés pendant des sondages d’opinion que j’ai menés en avril 2015.

Il est important que les hommes et les femmes aux postes de leadership et aux conseils d’administration, à l’échelle mondiale, comprennent comment les pays abordent le sujet de la diversité des genres. La diversité des genres au sein de nos conseils d’administration ne devrait pas être considérée comme « équitable ». C’est de la bonne gouvernance. Point à la ligne.

______________________________

*Johanne Bouchard est consultante auprès de conseils d’administration, de chefs de la direction et de comités de direction. Johanne a développé une expertise au niveau de la dynamique et de la composition de conseils d’administration. Après l’obtention de son diplôme d’ingénieure en informatique, sa carrière l’a menée à œuvrer dans tous les domaines du secteur de la technologie, du marketing et de la stratégie à l’échelle mondiale.

Un trop grand attentisme dans la gouvernance des sociétés conduit les autorités règlementaires à l’imposition de directives contraignantes


Les autorités règlementaires canadiennes insistent depuis longtemps sur la mise en place de mesures propices à l’amélioration de la gouvernance dans les sociétés cotées en bourse. Cependant, les directives ne sont pas très contraignantes ; elles s’apparentent à la stratégie du « Comply or Explain » que l’on retrouve dans la plupart des codes de gouvernance.

Richard Leblanc* vient de publier un excellent article dans Listed, The Magazine for Canadian Listed Companies, sur l’importance pour les entreprises d’agir avant que les régulateurs n’imposent des cibles à atteindre, dans des délais relativement courts. Ainsi, comme le mentionne le professeur Leblanc, lorsque les régulateurs veulent que des changements se réalisent, ils déterminent des cibles ou des quotas chiffrés !

Or, nos entreprises se traînent les pieds en ce qui concerne la durée des mandats des administrateurs ainsi que la divulgation des politiques de diversité et les cibles eu égard au nombre de femmes sur les conseils. La flexibilité permise par le processus du Comply or Explain est déficiente, car, à ce jour, seulement 19 % des CA prescrivent des limites aux mandats des administrateurs, 14 % dévoilent leur politique de diversité et 7 % ont des cibles claires pour l’atteinte d’un niveau de femmes sur le CA.

Puisque les entreprises peuvent soumettre leurs explications pour ne pas satisfaire certaines attentes, ils en profitent, trop souvent, pour noyer le poisson en adoptant un discours verbeux et légaliste. Par exemple, les attentes en ce qui concerne la limite des mandats varient entre 9 et 15 ans, et entre 30 % et 50 % pour le nombre de femmes sur les CA.

L’auteur exhorte les entreprises à se fixer des cibles avant que les régulateurs ne le fassent à leur place.

With comply or explain, Canadian regulators gave companies an opportunity to craft policies that work for them. But they haven’t ruled out quotas or term limits if inadequate progress continues.

Afin d’éviter que les directives deviennent vraiment contraignantes, l’auteur recommande aux entreprises émettrices de tenir compte des huit conseils suivants :

 

Board reform : the writing on the wall

 

• Do not misjudge the regulator, or the importance of gender diversity for the current provincial and new federal governments.

• Act on conflicts of interest. If a tenure or diversity policy affects one or more of your directors, excuse these directors from the room. They should not influence the decision.

• Land on a target. If your board has zero women, start with one woman as your target. Targets should be aspirational and dynamic.

AMF-autorite-des-marches-financier

• If you think 9 years is too low for director tenure, choose 12 years. 15 years is on the high end, and companies are landing on 12, particularly large, complex companies. But pick a target.

• If you do not pick a target for tenure, then you best have a rigorous and consequential peer director assessment regime, whose output is actual director resignations.

• Own the tenure and diversity policy. Draft it yourself, or have an independent adviser assist you. Do not assume an inadequate policy will go unnoticed.

• Watch for past practices that might bias women. If your talent pool is directors whom you know, rather than the best directors available, then you best enlarge your talent pool.

• No director is irreplaceable, and directorships are not lifetime appointments. But if you believe a particular director’s tenure is advantageous, use average director tenure or have exceptions built into a policy to give you degrees of freedom.

___________________________________

*Richard Leblanc is an associate professor, governance, law & ethics, at York University’s Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies and a member of the Ontario Bar. E-mail: rleblanc@yorku.ca.

Représentation des femmes au sein des conseils d’administration au Québec


Vous trouverez, ci-dessous, les résultats d’une étude de la Chaire de recherche en gouvernance de sociétés portant sur la représentation des femmes au sein des conseils d’administration de sociétés ciblées par la Table des partenaires influents.

Voici, dans un premier temps, une brève mise en contexte de la création de la Table des partenaires influents (que l’on retrouve sur le site de la Chaire)

 

Impression

Mise en contexte

Dans son Plan d’action gouvernemental pour l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes 2011 2015, le Secrétariat à la condition féminine (Secrétariat) prévoyait, à la mesure 91, de faire la promotion de la parité dans les conseils d’administration des grandes entreprises privées. C’est dans ce contexte que la Table des partenaires influents a été créée et a eu pour mandat de proposer des moyens concrets pour augmenter le nombre de femmes dans la haute direction et les conseils d’administration des sociétés cotées, de promouvoir l’objectif fixé et de susciter l’adhésion à celui-ci.

La Table était coprésidée par Mme Monique Jérôme-Forget, ancienne ministre des Finances et ancienne présidente du Conseil du trésor du Québec, et par M. Guy Saint-Pierre, ancien président et chef de la direction du Groupe SNC Lavalin inc. et ancien président du conseil d’administration de la Banque Royale du Canada. Les autres membres étaient :

M. Yvon Charest, président et chef de la direction, Industrielle Alliance, Assurance et Services financiers inc.

Mme Jacynthe Côté, chef de la direction, Rio Tinto Alcan

Mme Paule Gauthier, avocate spécialisée en médiation et arbitrage, Stein Monast

Mme Isabelle Hudon, présidente, Financière Sun Life, Québec

M. Hubert T. Lacroix, président-directeur général, CBC/Radio-Canada

Mme Monique Leroux, présidente et chef de la direction, Mouvement Desjardins

Sociétés visées

Les sociétés cotées en Bourse ayant leur siège social au Québec, ainsi que celles qui y ont des activités commerciales significatives.

Recommandations

Dans sa stratégie d’action annoncée le 19 avril 2013 la Table des partenaires influents (la Table) recommandait :

Que les entreprises privées cotées en Bourse prennent un engagement volontaire afin d’augmenter le nombre de femmes dans leur conseil d’administration et au sein de leur haute direction et en fassent la divulgation dans leur circulaire de direction. La Table recommandait aux sociétés une zone de parité de représentation des deux genres allant de 40 % à 60 %.

Quant aux délais, la Table suggérait de s’inspirer des cibles suivantes : 20 % des postes occupés par des femmes d’ici 2018, 30 % en 2023 et 40 % en 2028. Pour ce faire, la Table recommandait :

que le Secrétariat s’assure de la constitution et de la publication d’un tableau annuel faisant état de la représentation des femmes dans les conseils d’administration de 60 sociétés cotées en Bourse

la diffusion des engagements volontaires pris par ces sociétés cotées en Bourse en cours d’années

la collecte et la présentation des données relatives aux initiatives prises, aux ressources investies et aux obstacles rencontrés par des sociétés cotées en Bourse pour servir de modèles aux autres entreprises

 

En réponse à ces recommandations de la Table, le Secrétariat a confié un mandat au titulaire de la Chaire de recherche en gouvernance de sociétés, le professeur Jean Bédard, et à la titulaire de la Chaire de leadership en enseignement – Femmes et Organisations, la professeure Sophie Brière.

Vous trouverez, ci-dessous, le rapport de la Chaire de recherche en gouvernance de sociétés :

Représentation des femmes au sein des conseils d’administration des sociétés

 

Bonne lecture !

Composition et renouvellement des CA | Une enquête de EY


Je vous invite à prendre connaissance du rapport publié par Ernst & Young Center for Board Matters dans lequel on présente les résultats d’une enquête portant, entre autre, sur la composition des CA et sur les mécanismes de renouvellement des membres du conseil.

Jamais la composition des conseils d’administration n’aura été autant scrutée par les investisseurs et les actionnaires. Et ce n’est que le début des interventions des actionnaires pour l’obtention d’un Board exemplaire…

Il y a vingt ans, il y avait peu d’interrogations sur la matrice des compétences, des habiletés et des expériences des membres des conseils d’administration. De nos jours les actionnaires veulent savoir si leurs élus sont aptes (1) à accompagner la direction dans l’exécution de la stratégie et (2) à superviser la gestion des risques (voir mon billet sur ce sujet Trois étapes pour aider le CA à s’acquitter de ses obligations à l’égard de la surveillance de la gestion des risques).

Le problème du renouvellement des membres du conseil, l’absence d’une politique claire concernant le nombre limite d’années de service au conseil, ainsi que le manque flagrant de diversité sur les conseils sont des facteurs-clés qui amènent les actionnaires à exiger une plus grande divulgation des profils des administrateurs et un processus de nomination plus ouvert, lors des assemblées annuelles.

L’article a été publié sur le blogue du Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance. Voici une brève synthèse des résultats :

More than three-fourths of the investors we spoke with believe companies are not doing a good job of explaining why they have the right directors in the boardroom.
Companies can improve disclosures by making explicit which directors on the board are qualified to oversee key areas of risk for the company and how director qualifications align with strategy. Providing clarity around how board candidates are identified and vetted and the process for supporting board diversity goals may also strengthen investor confidence in the nomination process.
Rigorous board evaluations, including assessing the performance of individual board members, as well as the performance and composition of the board and its committees, are generally considered valuable mechanisms for stimulating thoughtful board turnover, but views about other approaches (e.g., term limits) differ widely.

L’article présente les avenues à explorer pour améliorer la composition des CA. Également, l’article propose trois bons moyens pour renforcer la divulgation liée à la composition du conseil. Enfin, l’article présente une manière originale de conceptualiser le renouvellement des conseils, en s’appuyant, notamment, sur de solides évaluations des administrateurs.

Voici des extraits de l’article. Bonne lecture !

2015 Proxy Season Insights: Board Composition

Room for improvement in making the case for board composition

Despite investor acknowledgement that some leading companies are doing an excellent job in this area, most of the investors we spoke with believe companies are generally not making a compelling enough case in the proxy statement for why their directors are the best candidates for the job.

ey-most-companies-do-good-job

Three ways companies can enhance board composition disclosures

  1. Make disclosures company-specific and tie qualifications to strategy and risk: Be explicit about why the director brings value to the board based on the company’s specific circumstances. Companies should not assume that the connection between a director’s expertise and the company’s strategic and risk oversight needs is obvious. Also, explaining how the board, as a whole, is the right fit can be valuable, particularly given that most investors are evaluating boards holistically.
  2. Provide more disclosure around the director recruitment process and how candidates are sourced and vetted: Disclosing more information around the nomination process—how directors were identified (e.g., through a search firm), what the vetting process entailed, etc.—can mitigate concerns about the recruitment process being insular and informal.
  3. Discuss efforts to enhance gender and ethnic diversity: Many companies—nearly 60% of S&P 500 companies—say they specifically identify gender and ethnicity as a consideration when identifying director nominees, but that is not always reflected in the gender and ethnic makeup of the board. Disclosing a formal process to support board diversity, including providing clarity around what is considered an appropriate level of diversity, can highlight efforts to recruit diverse directors.

A skills matrix tied to company strategy can be a valuable disclosure tool but is not the only way to convey a thoughtful approach. A letter from the lead director or chairman that discusses the board’s succession planning and refreshment process and any recent composition changes can also be effective.

Beyond disclosure, engagement can provide investors a valuable dimension in assessing board quality. Involving key directors in conversations with shareholders can provide further insight into board dynamics, individual director strengths and composition decisions.

Views vary on mechanisms to trigger board renewal

When we asked investors what mechanisms boards can use to most effectively stimulate refreshment, the vast majority chose rigorous board evaluations as the optimal solution and director retirement ages as the least effective. However, views around the different mechanisms and how they should be used vary—as does how investors approach the topic of tenure altogether.

Some investors evaluate tenure and director succession planning as a forward-looking risk, while others focus on past company performance and decisions. The commentary below represents investor opinions on each mechanism.

One of the top takeaways from our dialogue dinners was the importance of robust board evaluations, including evaluations of individual board members, to meaningful board refreshment and board effectiveness. Some directors noted the value in bringing in an independent third party to facilitate in-depth board assessments and in changing evaluation methods as appropriate to reinvigorate the process. Some also noted that board evaluation effectiveness relies on the strength of the independent board leader leading the evaluation.

When it comes to how boards manage director tenure internally, setting expectations up front that directors’ board service will be for a limited amount of time—not necessarily until they reach retirement age—is important. We’ve heard from some directors that having periodic conversations with individual board members about their future on the board is valuable and can help provide “off ramps” and a healthy succession planning process.

ey-mechanisms-is-the-most-effective

Conclusion

Given investors’ increasing focus on board composition, companies may want to review and enhance proxy statement disclosures to ensure that director qualifications are explicitly tied to company-specific strategy and risks and that the board’s approach to diversity and succession planning is transparent.

Beyond disclosure, ongoing dialogue with institutional investors that involves independent board leaders may allow for a rich discussion around board composition. Also, through regular board refreshment and enhanced communications around director succession planning, companies may head off investor uncertainty and temptations to go down a rules-based path regarding director terms.

Conseils d’administration français | « On est vraiment passé du copinage à la recherche de valeur ajoutée »


Vous trouverez, ci-dessous, un entretien mené par Patrick Amoux auprès d’Agnès Touraine, présidente de l’Institut Français des Administrateurs (IFA), publié dans le nouvel Economiste.fr, qui fait un excellent bilan de la gouvernance en France depuis 10 ans.

Les actionnaires peuvent lui dire merci … Si leurs représentants dans les conseils d’administrations se sont vigoureusement professionnalisés pour défendre leurs intérêts, se mettant ni plus ni moins aux standards anglo-saxons et aux normes de gouvernance moderne démodant les si fameux petits arrangement entre « chers amis » c’est à l’Institut Français des administrateurs, à Daniel Lebègue qui l’a créé, à Agnès Touraine qui le préside désormais. Une autre époque pour ces instance de pilotage de la stratégie des entreprises qui justifie quelques sérieuses remises en cause compte tenu de la consanguinité chronique des vieux modèles.

Diversité, internationalisation, transparence, éthique, formation, professionnalisme….sur tous les fronts, il faut batailler, convaincre, décider afin que l’autorégulation évite le couperet de la loi. Agnès Touraine est donc aux avants postes de tous ces combats. La méthode douce n’exclut pas la détermination. « Un projet nous tient vraiment à cœur, le lien entre la qualité de la gouvernance et la compétitivité. Il faut que les organes de gouvernance soient vus comme des apports de valeurs ajoutées. » Cela suppose la qualité des compétences composant les conseils. L’un des plus vastes chantiers de la présidente de l’IFA.IMG_20141013_160948

En 10 ans, Daniel Lebègue a fait un travail remarquable en travaillant à cette révolution de la gouvernance des entreprises en France. Il y a 15 ans, la gouvernance était quelque chose qui n’existait pas. Avec l’évolution des lois, des règlements, et le code Afep-Medef de 2013 qui s’est mis en place, c’est probablement l’un des domaines où il se produit une vraie révolution par rapport au comportement des administrateurs d’autrefois. Elle se concrétise notamment par l’instauration des comités. Il y a 15 ans, il n’y avait ni comité d’audit, ni comité de rémunération, ni comité de nomination. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pas de groupe coté où il n’y ait pas un comité d’audit, bien sûr, et un comité de rémunération, de nomination.

Conseils d’administration : On est vraiment passé du copinage à la recherche de valeur ajoutée

 

Si vous souhaitez connaître la réalité française eu égard à la gouvernance, je vous conseille de lire cet article. Voici les sujets abordés dans cet entretien :

  1. L’apport de compétences
  2. L’entrée des femmes aux conseils d’administration
  3. Le déficit d’administrateurs étrangers
  4. Gouvernance et compétitivité
  5. La dissociation président/directeur général
  6. Les administrateurs indépendants
  7. Les rémunérations des patrons
  8. Les salariés administrateurs
  9. Le défi numérique
  10. Les conseils des ETI et des start-up
  11. L’évaluation des conseils d’administration
  12. La maison des administrateurs

_________________________________________

Les chiffres clés des conseils d’administration

Part des femmes (2014) :
-29 % pour le CAC40 (19 % en 2012)
-26 % au sein du SBF120 (15 % en 2012)

Administrateurs étrangers (2014) :
-30 % au sein du CAC40 (23 % en 2012)
-22 % au sein du SBF120 (13 % en 2012)

Source : Étude Ernst & Young et Labrador

Dissociation des fonctions :
-14 % des sociétés du CAC40 dissocient président du conseil et direction générale
-21 % des sociétés du SBF120

-11 % des sociétés du CAC40 ont une structure conseil de surveillance/directoire
-16 % du SBF120 ont opté pour ce mode de gouvernance

Source : Rapport du Haut Comité de gouvernement d’entreprise

Le Say on Pay :
> 90% d’approbation aux AG 2014 du SBF120

Nombre d’administrateurs du marché Euronext Paris :
1/ Cote parisienne : 966 émetteurs
7 045 administrateurs, dont 795 indépendants (11,3 %) et 1 316 femmes (18,7 %).
Moyenne de 7,3 administrateurs par émetteur.

2/ CAC 40 : 587 administrateurs dont 204 indépendants (34,7 %) et 172 femmes (29,3 %).
Moyenne de 14,7 administrateurs par émetteur.

Source : Cofisem ©

____________________________________________

*Bio express de Agnès Touraine, l’administrateure internationale

Sciences-Po, un MBA à Columbia, puis des débuts chez McKinsey… du classique haut de gamme, version délibérément grand large, pour l’entrée dans une vie professionnelle qui va mener Agnès Touraine chez Hachette. Membre du comité exécutif puis directrice de la branche grande diffusion du groupe Livre Hachette, avant de prendre la présidence de la filiale multimédia de CEP Communication, devenue Havas Interactive, elle devient ensuite directrice générale déléguée et membre du comité exécutif de Vivendi Universal Publishing du temps de Jean-Marie Messier et des grandes acquisitions américaines. Cette passionnée de nouvelles technologies crée ensuite la société de conseil en management Act III Consultants, puis une structure dédiée aux jeux vidéo, Act III Gaming. Administratrice de nombreuses sociétés (Neopost, ITV, Coridis, Playcast Media) et de l’Institut Français des administrateurs, dont elle a pris la présidence cette année.

Information sur la représentation féminine au conseil d’administration | Le Monde du Droit*


L’Autorité canadienne des marchés financiers (AMF) apporte des modifications au règlement sur l’information concernant les pratiques en matière de gouvernance, notamment des modifications relatives à l’information sur la représentation féminine au conseil d’administration et à la haute direction des émetteurs.

Annoncées dans un communiqué du 15 octobre 2014, ces modification visent à d’accroître la transparence de l’information fournie aux investisseurs et aux autres intéressés sur la représentation des femmes au conseil d’administration et à la haute direction des émetteurs, afin d’aider les investisseurs à prendre leurs décisions d’investissement et à exercer leur droit de vote.

IMG_20141013_155500Ces modifications obligeront les émetteurs non émergents à présenter dans leurs circulaires de sollicitation de procurations et notices annuel une information annuelleles sur :

(1) la durée du mandat et les autres mécanismes de renouvellement des membres du conseil d’administration ;

(2) les politiques sur la représentation féminine au conseil d’administration ;

(3) la prise en compte par le conseil d’administration ou le comité des candidatures de la représentation féminine dans la recherche et la sélection des candidats aux postes d’administrateurs ;

(4) la prise en compte par l’émetteur de la représentation féminine dans la nomination des membres de la haute direction ;

(5) les cibles de représentation féminine au conseil d’administration et à la haute direction ;

(6) le nombre de femmes au conseil d’administration et à la haute direction.

________________________________________________________________

*LE MONDE DU DROIT : Canada : information sur la représentation féminine au conseil d’administration et à la haute direction des émetteurs.

Source: www.lemondedudroit.fr

Deux grandes approches réglementaires à la diversité sur les C.A. : (1) les quotas ou les mesures ciblées et (2) l’obligation de divulgation


Aujourd’hui, j’aimerais partager avec vous une étude empirique vraiment très intéressante portant sur deux approches réglementaires à la diversité sur les conseils d’administration:

(1) les quotas ou les mesures ciblées et

(2) l’obligation de divulgation.

Aaron A. Dhir,  professeur associé de droit à la Osgoode Hall Law School de Toronto, présente plusieurs réflexions fort pertinentes sur l’expérience norvégienne d’imposition de quotas pour accroître le nombre de femmes sur les conseils d’administration.

Plusieurs règlementations se sont inspirées de cette approche pour prendre en compte cette variable fondamentale. La conclusion de l’auteur au sujet de cette première approche réglementaire est résumée de la façon suivante :

My study of the Norwegian quota model demonstrates the important role diversity can play in enhancing the quality of corporate governance, while also revealing the challenges diversity mandates pose.

En ce qui concerne l’approche basée sur l’obligation de divulgation des mesures de diversité adoptée par la Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), il appert que la règle ne donne aucune définition de la diversité et que les entreprises peuvent l’interpréter comme bon leur semble.

L’étude montre cependant que les organisations ont tendance à définir la diversité de manière très large, notamment en faisant référence à l’expérience antérieure pertinente des administrateurs (qui n’a rien à voir avec les caractéristiques sociodémographiques telles que le genre).

L’auteur avance également que cette réglementation a donné lieu à beaucoup d’efforts de définition de la diversité :

My study shows that “diversity” carries multiple connotations for these firms. My most salient finding, however, is that when interpreting this concept in the absence of regulatory guidance, the dominant corporate discourse is experiential rather than identity-based. Firms most frequently define diversity with reference to a director’s prior experience or other non-identity-based factors rather than his or her socio-demographic characteristics. The data provide a unique window into the potential meanings of “diversity” in the corporate governance setting, as well as the limits of a strategy that permits corporations to give the term their own definition.

L’auteur nous incite à lire les chapitres 1, 4 et 6 qui ont été publiés sur le réseau SSRN (Social Science Research Network). Le chapitre 1 présente l’objet de l’étude, la méthodologie, les deux variables étudiées, les résultats sommaires et les perspectives futures eu égard au débat sur la diversité.

Bonne lecture !

Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity: Corporate Law, Governance, and Diversity

The lack of gender parity in the governance of business corporations has ignited a heated global debate, leading policymakers to wrestle with difficult questions that lie at the intersection of market activity and social identity politics. In my new book, Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity: Corporate Law, Governance, and Diversity (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2015), I draw on semi-structured interviews with corporate board directors in Norway and documentary content analysis of corporate securities filings in the United States to investigate empirically two distinct regulatory models designed to address diversity in the boardroom—quotas and disclosure.IMG_00001049

In Chapter 4, recently made available on SSRN, I explore the quota-based approach to achieving gender balance in corporate boardrooms. Quotas and related target-based measures for publicly traded firms are currently in place in a number of countries, including Iceland, Belgium, France, Italy, and Norway and are at different stages of consideration in other jurisdictions, including Canada, the European Union, and Germany.

I present findings from my qualitative, interview-based study of Norwegian corporate directors in order to provide empirical elucidation of how quota-based regimes operate in practice. The identity narratives of Norwegian board members offer particularly rich sources of insight, given that Norway was the first jurisdiction to pursue the quota path and thus has the most mature quota regime. While highly contentious when adopted, the Norwegian quota project unquestionably set the stage for subsequent legislative developments in other countries.

I delve into the lived experiences of Norwegian directors who gained appointments as a result of Norway’s quota law, as well as those who held appointments before the law was enacted. Several questions frame my investigation. How have these individuals subjectively experienced, and made sense of, this intrusive form of regulation? How does legally required gender diversity affect their economic and institutional lives? And how has it shaped boardroom cultural dynamics and decision making, as well as the overall governance fabric of the board?

The forced repopulation of boards along gender lines has disturbed the traditional order of corporate governance systems, dislocating established hierarchies of power in key market-based institutions. Norway represents the paradigmatic case of this disturbance and has set in motion a wave of corporate governance reform unlike any other. As such, it constitutes a fascinating and appropriate case study through which to consider the implications of quota regimes. My study of the Norwegian quota model demonstrates the important role diversity can play in enhancing the quality of corporate governance, while also revealing the challenges diversity mandates pose.

In Chapter 6, also recently made available on SSRN, I explore the disclosure-based approach to addressing diversity in corporate governance. In 2009, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rule requiring publicly traded firms to report on whether they consider diversity in identifying director nominees and, if so, how. The rule also requires firms that have adopted a diversity policy to describe how they implement the policy and assess its effectiveness. The rule does not define “diversity,” however, leaving it to corporations to give this term meaning.

I present findings from my mixed-methods content analysis of corporate disclosures submitted during the first four years of the rule in order to provide empirical elucidation of how the rule operates in practice. The research sample consists of a hand-collected dataset of the 2010–2013 definitive proxy statements of S&P 100 firms. I am interested in learning how these firms, in responding to the rule, construct the concept of diversity through their public discourse. What does diversity, viewed through the prism of legal regulation, mean to market participants? How do they interpret and understand this socio-political idea in the absence of a regulatory definition? How is diversity constituted and discursively performed?

The SEC’s disclosure rule has caused US corporations to establish a vocabulary of diversity. My study shows that “diversity” carries multiple connotations for these firms. My most salient finding, however, is that when interpreting this concept in the absence of regulatory guidance, the dominant corporate discourse is experiential rather than identity-based. Firms most frequently define diversity with reference to a director’s prior experience or other nonidentity-based factors rather than his or her socio-demographic characteristics. The data provide a unique window into the potential meanings of “diversity” in the corporate governance setting, as well as the limits of a strategy that permits corporations to give the term their own definition.

Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity aims to deepen ongoing policy conversations and offer new insights into the role law can play in reshaping the gendered dynamics of corporate governance cultures. The full version of Chapter 1 is available for download here.

Nouvelles capsules vidéos en gouvernance – La diversité et la gestion des risques


Le Collège des administrateurs de sociétés est heureux de vous dévoiler sa 3e série de capsules d’experts, formée de huit entrevues vidéo.

Pendant 3 minutes, un expert du Collège partage une réflexion et se prononce sur un sujet d’actualité lié à la gouvernance. Une capsule est dévoilée chaque semaine.

Aujourd’hui, je vous propose le visionnement des deux plus récentes capsules d’experts qui sont maintenant en ligne. Elles ont pour thèmes « La diversité » par Mme Nicolle Forget, administratrice de sociétés, et « La gestion des risques » par M. Martin Leblanc, CA, CMC, Associé, Services-conseils – Management et Gestion des risques, KPMG.

Visionnez ces deux capsules d’experts :

La diversité, par Nicolle Forget [+]

 

________________________________________________

Nouveau code de conduite européen pour les firmes spécialisées en recherche de cadres


Voici un bref condensé préparé par Roger Baker, de IoD (UK) et diffusé par Béatrice RICHEZ-BAUM, secrétaire générale de European Confederation of Directors’ Associations (ecoDa), relatif aux nouvelles directives contenues dans un code de conduite à l’intention des firmes conseils en recrutement de cadres et d’administrateurs de sociétés.

Ce nouveau code, dit volontaire,  met l’accent sur la reconnaissance des efforts des sociétés du FSTE 350 eu égard à la planification de la relève des administrateurs, notamment des candidates féminines. Cette approche « soft » rejoint tout à fait le courant de pensée britannique en matière de changement dans le domaine de la gouvernance corporative (Comply or Explain).

The new Code of Conduct for Executive Search firms

 

The new Enhanced Voluntary Code of Conduct for Executive Search Firms gives recognition to those firms who have been most successful in the recruitment of women to FSTE 350 boards. It builds on the terms of the standard voluntary code and will also recognize the outstanding efforts of search firms working to build the pipeline of FTSE board directors of the future.

The Enhanced Voluntary Code was drawn up by the search firms themselves working with the Davies Steering Group. It contains 10 new provisions, from launching initiatives to support aspiring women to sharing of best practice and running awareness programmes within their own firms.

 

Roger Barker

Under the new provisions, it is specified that:

  1. Search firms should support chairmen and their nomination committees in developing medium-term succession plans that identify the balance of experience and skills that they will need to recruit for over the next two to three years to maximize board effectiveness. This time frame will allow a broader view to be established by looking at the whole board, not individual hires; this should facilitate increased flexibility in candidate specifications.
  2. When taking a specific brief, search firms should look at overall board composition and, in the context of the board’s agreed aspirational goals on gender balance and diversity more broadly, explore with the chairman if recruiting women directors is a priority on this occasion.
  3. During the selection process, search firms should provide appropriate support, in particular to first-time candidates, to prepare them for interviews and guide them through the process.
  4. Search firms should provide advice to clients on best practice in induction and ‘onboarding’ processes to help new board directors settle quickly into their roles.

Voici un lien qui vous donnera plus de détails sur ce nouveau code ainsi qu’une vidéo de Viviane Reeding sur l’importance à accorder à l’accroissement du nombre de candidatures féminines aux conseils d’administration des sociétés européennes :

http://www.aesc.org/eweb/Dynamicpage.aspx?webcode=PressRelease&wps_key=012f6000-a53e-49f3-b2de-0a1e8eda7106

 

Articles reliés :

Les femmes dans les C.A. | Une étude à l’échelle internationale *


Voici une étude internationale publiée par Paul Hastings sur la place des femmes dans les conseils d’administration et sur les contenus des codes de gouvernance eu égard à la parité.

Cette étude couvre plusieurs thèmes concernant le raffermissement de la situation des femmes dans les instances de décision, notamment :

(1) éduquer les C.A. sur les impératifs d’affaires reliés à l’importance de la diversité;

(2) présenter des stratégies d’ouverture de postes sur les conseils d’administration;

(3) créer des réseaux et des banques de candidatures féminines.

Les auteurs font le point sur l’évolution de la situation des femmes dans les C.A., pays par pays. Je vous invite à consulter cet ouvrage afin de vous familiariser avec les règlementations internationales en gouvernance. On y présente un excellent résumé des codes de gouvernance :

Résumé des codes de gouvernance par pays | Paul Hastings 

Le document suivant présente le sommaire exécutif de l’étude de Paul Hastings :

Summary of the study « Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Women in the Boardroom »

English: Paul Hastings LLP

Enfin, si vous souhaitez approfondir votre connaissance du sujet, vous pouvez lire le document au complet :

Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Women in the Boardroom | Full report

Voici un extrait de l’étude

Europe continues to be a leader on this issue. In the past year, we saw tangible progress as well as continued debate about the best approaches for promoting greater representation of women on corporate boards. 2013 showed the highest year-on-year change recorded to date in the average number of women on boards of large corporations in European Union Member States, in part due to mandatory quotas. However, several EU countries have pursued strategies other than mandatory quotas to address the gap. Austria, Denmark, Finland, the United Kingdom, and Sweden favor legislation and corporate codes that allow companies to set their own targets and policies. Recent amendments to the UK’s corporate governance code more explicitly reference gender as a factor in making board appointments.  The changes also require that companies report publically on their board member selection process, diversity, and gender policy as well as measurable objectives for implementing and gauging progress.  In Germany, the debate over fixed quotas continues within the government and no legislation addressing gender parity is expected this year.

The United States and Canada continue to exhibit only marginal growth in the percentage of women on boards since the 2012 report. However, in the United States, there has been renewed attention and discourse in the public domain regarding the lack of women in the highest echelons of corporate leadership following several op-eds and most notably, Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead.  Notably, much of the discourse has centered on private sector initiatives, rather than mandatory quotas or other legislative solutions.

In Australia, new legislation has bolstered reporting requirements: private companies with 80 or more employees must report annually regarding specific gender equality indicators.  The legislation includes potential sanctions such as naming non-compliant companies in national newspapers and jeopardizing such companies’ eligibility for government contracting.  In New Zealand, the proposed NZSX/NZDX Listing Rules regarding diversity have been enacted, requiring listed companies to provide a breakdown of the gender composition of their directors and officers.

* En reprise

Enhanced by Zemanta

Commentaire de l’IAS-ICD à l’attention de la CVMO | Amendements proposés aux pratiques de divulgation en matière de gouvernance


Voici un communiqué de l’Institut des administrateurs de sociétés (IAS-ICD) qui fait état de sa position auprès de la Commission des valeurs mobilières de l’Ontario (CVMO), en réponse à la sollicitation de commentaires sur des amendements proposés aux pratiques de divulgation en matière de gouvernance (Formulaire 58-101F1 et Règlement 58-101).

Dans cette lettre, l’IAS salue la CVMO et la Province de l’Ontario pour leurs initiatives visant à favoriser la diversité des genres et enjoint la CVMO à travailler en collaboration avec les Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières afin d’élaborer une initiative nationale sur la diversité des genres.

L’IAS souligne également qu’il s’est fait depuis longtemps, lors de consultations auprès du gouvernement et des autorités réglementaires, un promoteur du régime « se conformer ou s’expliquer ». La lettre comprend également les suggestions suivantes pour améliorer la diversité des genres au sein des conseils d’administration :

  1. Les émetteurs devraient divulguer des cibles concernant la représentation des femmes au conseil et la manière dont ils entendent mesurer leur progrès au fil du temps. S’il n’y a pas de cibles, on devrait pouvoir exiger de l’émetteur qu’il divulgue comment il entend s’y prendre pour favoriser la diversité.
  2. De nouvelles exigences devraient être instaurées au même moment pour tous les émetteurs non émergents, sans égard à leur capitalisation boursière ou à leur indice de société.
  3. La question des limites de mandat a une portée beaucoup plus large et complexe que son seul rapport à la diversité et devrait donc être envisagée dans le cadre d’une consultation distincte. L’IAS favorise l’amélioration continue des conseils d’administration, mais ne croit pas que le renouvellement des conseils se résume simplement à une question de compte.
  4. Les exigences proposées de divulgation du nombre et de la proportion de femmes parmi les cadres dirigeants des filiales de l’émetteur ne sont pas nécessaires, seraient trop lourdes et ne devraient donc pas figurer parmi les amendements.

Veuillez cliquer ici pour lire l’intégralité de la lettre de commentaires. Les membres peuvent transmettre leur rétroaction sur cette prise de position de politique et d’autres initiatives à l’adresse de courriel comments@icd.ca.

Enhanced by Zemanta

La gouvernance dans tous ses états | Première série d’articles


Voici les quatre premiers articles, d’une série de huit, publiés le 17 mars 2014 par les experts du Collège des administrateurs de sociétés (CAS) dans le volet Dossier de l’édition Les Affaires.com

Découvrez comment les entreprises et les administrateurs doivent s’adapter afin de tirer profit des meilleures pratiques

La gouvernance dans tous ses états | Première série d’articles

Présenté par

CAS

Dossier à suivre

                   

image
Gouvernance : huit principes à respecter
image
Conseils d’administration : la diversité, mode d’emploi
image
Les administrateurs doivent-ils développer leurs compétences?
image
Vous souhaitez occuper un poste sur un conseil d’administration ?
Enhanced by Zemanta

Les femmes sont encore exclues du « Boy’s Club » !


Voici un excellent article Mark Koba dans NBC NEWS, section Business, qui présente les résultats d’une enquête sur la place des femmes dans les conseils d’administration ainsi que dans les postes de haute direction.

Comme vous le constaterez, le Canada a un sérieux retard à combler en comparaison de pays qui visent la parité ! Au Québec, la situation est moins dramatique bien que requérant toute notre attention.

Rappelons que le Québec est cité en exemple pour avoir réussi à atteindre la parité hommes/femmes sur les conseils d’administration des sociétés d’état.

C’est une lecture très clairement présentée. Je vous invite à prendre connaissance de ce court extrait. Bonne lecture !

Boardroom Boys’ Club : Women Still Mostly Shut Out

March 8 marks International Women’s Day, a time designated to honor women for their economic, political and social achievements.

But when it comes to the business world, there’s a strong feeling that American women have not come far enough on issues like equal pay — and on having a seat in corporate boardrooms.

« The challenges of 20 years ago for women are still with us, » said Susan Nethero, managing director of Golden Seeds Investment, a firm dedicated to female-owned and -managed businesses. « There’s been some improvement, but it’s not really gotten any easier for women to be successful at high levels in business. »

Nethero spent 20 years in corporate America working in management positions for companies like Xerox and Dow Chemical as well as starting and working as CEO of her own retail firm. She said women still don’t feel part of a business culture still dominated by men.

That culture, said Margery Kraus, founder and CEO of consulting firm APCO Worldwide, creates a kind of exclusion against women.

Norway, Finland and France have quota laws requiring in some cases at least a 40 percent level of female representation on corporate boards.

« We face discrimination at all levels, like trying to raise money for a business, » said the 67-year-old Kraus, who is chairman of the board of the Women Presidents’ Organization, a group dedicated to helping women entrepreneurs. « There’s a presumption that women can’t do certain things in business and that’s just wrong. »

U.S. lags other advanced countries

Marissa Mayer

Women hold 16 percent of corporate board seats in the U.S., and they hold 14 percent of executive officer positions, according to Catalyst Research. Just 23 of the Fortune 500 CEOs are females.

CEOs like Mary Barra at General Motors, Meg Whitman at Hewlett-Packard, Laura Alber of Williams-Sonoma, Marissa Mayer at Yahoo are examples of progress.

Compared with some countries, the U.S. trails in the number of women occupying corporate chairs. In Norway, 41 percent of board seats are held by women. In Sweden and Finland, it’s 27 percent; in France, it’s 18 percent.

However, getting to those higher levels came through regulation. Norway, Finland and France have quota laws requiring in some cases at least a 40 percent level of female representation on corporate boards, other times an equal 50-50 men-to-women ratio.

Board seats held by women by country
Enhanced by Zemanta

Consultation sur des modifications aux règles de divulgation | CVMO


Deloitte dans son bulletin « À l’avant-garde des projets de normalisation » nous rappelle que la CVMO propose des modifications aux règles sur la divulgation de la représentation des femmes au sein des conseils d’administration et des équipes de direction.

La période de commentaires se terminera le 16 avril 2014

Les modifications proposées exigeraient que les émetteurs inscrits à la bourse de Toronto (et autres émetteurs non émergents) qui sont des émetteurs assujettis en Ontario divulguent annuellement des renseignements sur les sujets suivants :

  1. la durée maximale des mandats des administrateurs;
  2. les politiques relatives à la représentation des femmes au sein du conseil d’administration;

    English: Toronto: Skyline with CN Tower Deutsc...
    English: Toronto: Skyline with CN Tower Deutsch: Toronto: Skyline und CN Tower (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  3. la prise en compte par le conseil d’administration ou le comité des mises en candidature de la représentation des femmes dans le cadre du processus de recherche et de sélection des administrateurs;
  4. la prise en compte par les émetteurs de la représentation des femmes au sein des cadres dirigeants au moment d’effectuer des nominations;
  5. les objectifs de représentation des femmes au sein du conseil d’administration et des cadres dirigeants;
  6. le nombre de femmes membres du conseil d’administration et titulaires de postes de haute direction.

Télécharger les modifications proposées, y compris une transcription des discussions tenues lors de la table rond du 16 octobre dernier (fichier PDF de 156 pages en anglais).

Enhanced by Zemanta

Les particularités de la gouvernance des entreprises de haute technologie


Voici un billet de  David A. Bell, associé de la firme Fenwick & West LLP qui a récemment été publié sur le blogue du Harvard Law School. Ce texte est un résumé de la publication Corporate Governance Practices and Trends: A Comparison of Large Public Companies and Silicon Valley Companies (2013) dont le texte complet est disponible ici.

Depuis 2003, Fenwick fait l’inventaire des pratiques de gouvernance issues des corporations du Standard & Poor’s 100 Index (S&P 100) qui sont pertinentes pour les entreprises de haute technologie cotées de la Silicon Valley 150 Index (SV 150). Vous trouverez dans le document ci-joint des données comparatives, souvent étonnantes et très significatives, entre les deux groupes sur les thèmes suivants :

  1. Composition du conseil d’administration;
  2. Nombre d’administrateurs exécutifs sur le conseil;
  3. Diversité du membership, notamment la proportion de femmes;
  4. La taille et le nombre de réunions du C.A. et de ses comités statutaires;
  5. Les pratiques du « majority voting » et du « board classification »;
  6. L’utilisation de la structure du vote à classes multiples;
  7. Les directives concernant l’actionnariat des administrateurs;
  8. La fréquence ainsi que le nombre de propositions des actionnaires activistes.

Je vous invite à lire cet extrait, puis si vous souhaitez en savoir plus, lisez aussi le résumé du HLS. Enfin, si l’étude détaillée vous intéresse vous pouvez vous procurer le rapport complet ici.

Corporate Governance at Silicon Valley Companies 2013

In each case, comparative data is presented for the S&P 100 companies and for the high technology and life science companies included in the SV 150, as well as trend information over the history of the survey. In a number of instances we also present data showing comparison of the top 15, top 50, middle 50 and bottom 50 companies of the SV 150 (in terms of revenue), illustrating the impact of scale on the relevant governance practices.

Significant Findings

Governance practices and trends (or perceived trends) among the largest companies are generally presented as normative for all public companies. However, it is also somewhat axiomatic that corporate governance practices should be tailored to suit the circumstances of the individual company involved. Among the significant differences between the corporate governance practices of the SV 150 high technology and life science companies and the uniformly large public companies of the S&P 100 are:

English: Apple's headquarters at Infinite Loop...
English: Apple’s headquarters at Infinite Loop in Cupertino, California, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The number of executive officers tends to be substantially lower in the SV 150 than in the S&P 100 (in the 2013 proxy season, average of 6.5 compared to 11.2). In both groups there has been a long-term, slow but steady decline in the average number of executive officers per company, as well as a narrowing in the range of the number of executive officers in each group.

While there has been a general downward trend in both groups, the SV 150 companies continue to be substantially less likely to have a combined board chair/CEO than S&P 100 companies (in the 2013 proxy season, 37% compared to 72%). Where there is a separate chair, they are also substantially more likely to be a non-insider at SV 150 companies (in the 2013 proxy season, 69% compared to 21%). Lead directors are substantially more common among S&P 100 companies (in the 2013 proxy season, 85% compared to 44%).

The S&P 100 companies tend to have larger boards than SV 150 companies (average of 12.0 compared to average of 8.1 in the 2013 proxy season), and tend toward larger primary committees (audit, compensation and nominating). They are also substantially more likely to have other standing committees (83% of S&P 100 companies do, compared to 23% of SV 150 companies in the 2013 proxy season).

Female directors are substantially more common among S&P 100 companies whether measured in terms of average number of female directors (in the 2013 proxy season, 2.4 compared to 0.8) or in terms of average percentage of each board that are women (in the 2013 proxy season, 19.9% compared to 9.1%). While female board membership peaked among SV 150 companies in the 2008 proxy season (average of 12.3% compared to 17.2% for the S&P 100), the overall trend is clearly upward in both groups (compared to averages of 10.9% in the S&P 100 and 2.1% in the SV 150 in the 1996 proxy season). From the 1996 through 2013 proxy seasons, the percentage of companies with no women directors declined from 11% to 2% in the S&P 100 and 82% to 43% in the SV 150.

SV 150 companies continue to have more insiders as a percentage of the full board, while S&P 100 companies continue to have more insider directors measured in absolute numbers (while there has been and longer term downward trend in insiders, both groups have held essentially steady over the past five proxy seasons).

While there is a clear trend toward adoption of some form of majority voting in both groups, the rate of adoption is substantially higher among S&P 100 companies (92% compared to 44% of SV 150 companies in the 2013 proxy season), although it declined 5% from the 2011 proxy season (compared to a 7% increase for the SV 150).

Stock ownership guidelines for executive officers are substantially more common among S&P 100 companies (in the 2013 proxy season, 95% compared to 53%), although that is a substantial increase for both groups over the course of the survey (compared to 58% for the S&P 100 and 8% for the SV 150 in 2004), including a 9% increase in the SV 150 over the last year. Similar trends hold for stock ownership guidelines covering board members (although the S&P 100 percentage is about 20% lower for directors over the period of the survey).

While classified boards used to be similarly common among both groups (about 44% for S&P 100 and 47% for SV 150 in 2004), there has been a marked long-term decline in the rate of their use among S&P 100 companies but not among SV 150 companies (11% for S&P 100 compared to 45% for SV 150 in the 2013 proxy season). Our data shows that within the SV 150, the rate of adoption fairly closely tracks with the size of company (measured by revenue).

Stockholder activism, measured in the form of proposals included in the proxy statements of companies, continues to be substantially lower among the high technology and life science companies in the SV 150 than among S&P 100 companies (whether measured in terms of frequency of inclusion of any such proposals or in terms of number of proposals). However, over the last two proxy seasons, the largest companies in the SV 150 have closed the gap and are now comparable to the S&P 100 in terms of frequency of having a least one such proposal.

Corporate Governance at Silicon Valley (venitism.blogspot.com)

Réflexions capitales pour les Boards en 2014 – The Harvard Law School (jacquesgrisegouvernance.com)

2013 Annual Corporate Governance Review (blogs.law.harvard.edu)